Month: October 2017

How to Teach Internet Safety to Younger Elementary Students

Summarized by Saad Khan

In classroom settings, the young students are taught to be wary of strangers. But with the advances in the social media landscape arises the need to educate the younger generation how to avoid getting themselves into danger with strangers on the internet. This case is especially important since it is hard to classify someone as a stranger on the internet.

We can start explaining the situation to young students by specifying “what is a stranger?”. What kind of questions are acceptable to answers and what kind of issues are dangerous to answer. In that regard, this article gives a step by step teaching plan in order to impart awareness to young students.

References:

Hertz, M. B. (2012, June 04). How to Teach Internet Safety to Younger Elementary Students. Retrieved October 15, 2017, from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/internet-safety-younger-elementary-mary-beth-hertz

Oracy in the Classroom

Summarized by Shahrukh Khan

Group study, peer relations, brainstorming, and communication are the modern form of pedagogy. In constructivist instructional methods, students tend to gain brainstorming and teamwork strategies but along with that, there are also able to enhance their communication skills. The article emphasis on the importance of communication among the students. Discussion based learning can help in achieving learning objectives in the classroom. The modern strategy has been used by teachers in London’s public schools. Oracy in classroom triggers effective communication. It guides students to always respect each other’s ideas and be prepared to change your mind. It also assists students to clarify, challenge, summarize, and build on each other’s ideas. Oracy enhances teamwork as it Invites someone to contribute by asking a question (Edutopia, 2016).

 

References:

Edutopia. (2016, September 15). Oracy in the Classroom: Strategies for Effective Talk. Retrieved from Edutopia: https://www.edutopia.org/practice/oracy-classroom-strategies-effective-talk

Weaving STEAM curriculum together with storytelling

Summarized by Sangyoon Park

The introduction of the STEM field into the curriculum is a requirement for teachers. Linking to the STEM is essential in a variety of educational areas to provide students with a variety of learning experiences. It is also required by the Common Core State Standards. As the film and broadcasting instructor at The STEM Academy in Georgia, Fox has created a STEAM curriculum based on PBL(project-based learning) with her co-authors. She emphasizes the importance of storytelling. She says there are four essentials when creating a STEAM curriculum. The first is a plot. Plots can link topics. So we can complete the linked curriculum. The second is a problem that will keep students interested. The third is the enthusiasm to motivate students. The last element is a product. The finished product shows the results of what students have done visually. Through these factors, students will have the ability to solve problems.

Fox emphasizes the importance of storytelling. She says there are four essentials when creating a STEAM curriculum. The first is a plot. Plots can link topics. So we can complete the linked curriculum. The second is a problem that will keep students interested. The third is the enthusiasm to motivate students. The last element is a product. The finished product shows the results of what students have done visually. Through these factors, students will have the ability to solve problems.

References:

Krueger, N. (2017, July 11). Weaving STEAM curriculum together with storytelling. Retrieved October 11, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=1023&category=Computer-Science&article=Weaving%2BSTEAM%2Bcurriculum%2Btogether%2Bwith%2Bstorytelling

Sillicon Valley in the Classroom

Summarized by Mary McCann
As college enrollment rates continue to decrease nationally, it becomes ever more necessary for universities to find a solution. Mike Silagadze, CEO of tech start up Top Hat, believes that colleges should take a look at Silicon Valley for the answer. Businesses in Silicon Valley take a “customer first mindset”, and colleges could take a student first mindset by evaluating the needs of incoming and present students.
Small changes like providing digital textbooks and coursework, or streamlining due dates of assignments on digital platforms (much like SCSU’s D2L Brightspace), could help meet the needs of students. A switch to digital content would not only be more relatable for students, it would also be easier on their wallets, allowing more students to enroll.
References:
 
Silagadze, M. (2017). Silicon valley in the classroom: What universities could learn from the googles of the world. Forbes. Retreived from https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2017/10/02/silicon-valley-in-the-classroom-what-universities-could-learn-from-the-googles-of-the-world/#7dc0bded48b6

Learning through Youtube

Summarized by Sangyoon Park

The author explains that there is a vast amount of information available to students on Youtube. Of the many Youtube sources, students should be able to judge critical thinking about what content is beneficial to them.
Rather than explaining concepts to students, they can develop their ability to think through discussions.
The authors give examples of classes that apply YouTube to five different subjects. In English classes, we show criticism related to texts and discuss them accordingly. In social studies, the teachers show images of current events in various ways. Through this method, students can understand that an event will change in meaning depending on the interpretation. In mathematics and science, teachers could find videos that illustrate concepts to broaden students’ understanding.

References
Smith, A. (2017, July 25). 4 ways to teach students to find the gems in YouTube’s perilous terrain. Retrieved October 02, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=1028&category=Digital-and-media-literacy&article=4%2Bways%2Bto%2Bteach%2Bstudents%2Bto%2Bfind%2Bthe%2Bgems%2Bin%2BYouTube%27s%2Bperilous%2Bterrain

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