flipped classroom resources

More on flipped classroom in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=flipped&submit=Search

what is it?

  • The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed.
EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative 7 Things You Should Know About Flipped Classrooms – eli7081.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eli7081.pdf
  • Flipped classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional educational arrangement by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom.

Flipped classroom. (2016, March 22). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Flipped_classroom&oldid=711368580

  • In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates.
Flipping the Classroom | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/flipping-the-classroom/

flipped classroom

 

flipped classroom

flipped classroom

The Flipped Class: Overcoming Common Hurdles by Edutopia:
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-learning-toolkit-common-hurdles-jon-bergmann

platforms like Blackboard and Canvas are playing a bigger role in the flipped learning environment. Other viable options include Google’s Classroom, which “automates” the sharing process but isn’t necessarily an organizational tool.
McCrea, B. (2016). 6 Flipped Learning Technologies To Watch in 2016. THE Journal. Retrieved from https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/03/16/6-flipped-learning-technologies-to-watch-in-2016.aspx

Pros:

  • Helps kids who were absent, stay current.

  • Helps kids who don’t get the lesson the first time in class.

  • Good resource for teacher assistants or student support staff who may not know the curriculum or may not know what to focus on.

  • Can attach Google spreadsheets or other online quizzes to check for comprehension, along with the video link sent to students

Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/pros-and-cons-flipped-classroom
  • Students have more control
  • It promotes student-centered learning and collaboration
  • Access = easier for parents to see what’s going on
  • It can be more efficient
Acedo, M. (2013, November 27). 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
an example of a positive take:
  • Myth #1 – Proponents of the Flipped Classroom Methodology Dislike Lectures
  • Myth #2 – Flipping Your Class Means Getting Rid of Lecturing
  • Myth #3 – Flipping Your Class Will Mean That Students Will Stop Coming to Class
  • Myth #4 – Flipping Your Class Will Require Lots of Technical Knowledge
  • Myth #5 – Flipping Your Class Will Require Huge Amounts of Time
  • Myth #6 – Students Will Not Like the Flipped Class, and Your Teaching Evaluations Will Suffer
Kim, J. (n.d.). 6 Myths of the Flipped Classroom | Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/6-myths-flipped-classroom

Cons:

  • I have a long way to go in my skill set in making the videos interesting (they, to me anyway, are really boring to watch).
  • I’m not sure how much they (the videos) are being utilized. There are just certain items that are learned better through direct one on one contact.
  • I know as I’m teaching, I get direct feedback from my students by looking at their faces and gauging comprehension. I, as a teacher, don’t get that feedback as I’m designing and creating my videos.”
Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/pros-and-cons-flipped-classroom
  • It can create or exacerbate a digital divide
  • It relies on preparation and trust
  • Not naturally a test-prep form of learning
  • Time in front of screens–instead of people and places–is increased
Acedo, M. (2013, November 27). 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
an example of negative take:
  • I dislike the idea of giving my students homework.
  • A lecture by video is still a lecture.
  • I want my students to own their learning.
  • My students need to be able to find and critically evaluate their own resources
Wright, S. (2012, October 8). The Flip: End of a Love Affair. Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://plpnetwork.com/2012/10/08/flip-love-affair/

Research:

Zuber, W. J. (2016). The flipped classroom, a review of the literature. Industrial & Commercial Training, 48(2), 97-103. doi:10.1108/ICT-05-2015-0039 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/ICT-05-2015-0039

although learning styletheories serve as a justification for different learning activities it does not provide the necessarytheoretical framework as to how the activities need to be structured (Bishop and Verleger, 2013). p. 99

One observation from the literature is there is a lack of consistency of models of the FCM (Davieset al.,2013, p. 565) in addition to a lack of research into student performance, (Findlay-Thompson andMombourquette, 2014, p. 65; Euniceet al., 2013) broader impacts on taking up too much of thestudents’time and studies of broader student demographics. In another literature review of the FCM,Bishop and Verleger concur with the observation that there is a lack of consensus as to the definitionof the method and the theoretical frameworks (Bishop and Verleger, 2013). p. 99

The FCM isheavily reliant on technology and this is an important consideration for all who consideremploying the FCM. p. 101

Flipped Classrooms’ may not have any impact on learning:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/23/flipped-classrooms-may-not-have-any-impact-on-learning/

Gross, B., Marinari, M., Hoffman, M., DeSimone, K., & Burke, P. (2015). Flipped @ SBU: Student Satisfaction and the College Classroom. Educational Research Quarterly, 39(2), 36-52.
we found that high levels of student engagement and course satisfaction characterised the students in the flipped courses, without any observable reduction in academic performance.

Hotle, S. L., & Garrow, L. A. (2016). Effects of the Traditional and Flipped Classrooms on Undergraduate Student Opinions and Success. Journal Of Professional Issues In Engineering Education & Practice, 142(1), 1-11. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)EI.1943-5541.0000259
It was found that student performance on quizzes was not significantly different across the traditional and flipped classrooms. A key shortcoming noted with the flipped classroom was students’ inability to ask questions during lectures. Students in flipped classrooms were more likely to attend office hours compared to traditional classroom students, but the difference was not statistically significant.

Heyborne, W. H., & Perrett, J. J. (2016). To Flip or Not to Flip? Analysis of a Flipped Classroom Pedagogy in a General Biology Course. Journal Of College Science Teaching, 45(4), 31-37.
Although the outcomes were mixed, regarding the superiority of either pedagogical approach, there does seem to be a trend toward performance gains using the flipped pedagogy. We strongly advocate for a larger multiclass study to further clarify this important pedagogical question.

Tomory, A., & Watson, S. (2015). Flipped Classrooms for Advanced Science Courses. Journal Of Science Education & Technology, 24(6), 875-887. doi:10.1007/s10956-015-9570-8

 

5 Comments on flipped classroom resources

  1. Plamen Miltenoff
    March 24, 2016 at 9:15 pm (2 years ago)

    From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Huckleberry, David W
    Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2016 12:39 PM
    To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
    Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Discussion Questions for Educause Connect Miami

    Hello Allen! I can answer these while I eat lunch, in lieu of being in Miami. (excuse typos) 

    This is from the perspective of a centralized Teaching and Learning unit at Purdue – West Lafayette.

    1. Flipped classroom designs:
    o Who is doing this now?
    Very prominent at Purdue, as it is one of President Daniel’s Major Moves to have Transformative Education. It is being done in the right situations though, as a part of the IMPACT course re-design program. Not every course is best taught in flipped, nor is every Learning Outcome for that matter, so it is used when it best meets the need.
    o What kinds of support do you have?
    Our Learning Spaces group maintains the Video Express rooms across campus used to easily capture the instructor video content. Those are setup with Wacom tablets to capture handwriting, as well as green screen. Video editing (when needed) is supported by the Consulting and Training staff of 12. Support for Instructional Design and Innovation is supported by 15 people in our groups.
    o Under what conditions has it been successful or unsuccessful?
    It has been most successful when the content is in the LOTS range of Blooms. Presenting definitions, concepts, formulas, and showing examples. The data shows that indeed 5-10 minute videos are watched more completely, even to the point that students watch 8 minutes of a 30min video, but if you chunk it into 6 5min videos, they watch about 4 min of each, for 24 min of the content. Interesting data.
    2. Accessibility on campus and online:
    o Is accessibility a core part of faculty development efforts?
    Within out Teaching and Learning group, we have 2 staff members dedicated to Accessibility. They serve to provide the rest of the team PD on Accessibility, as well as being a resource when needed for direct consultations. They have been instrumental in the efforts to promote awareness of web, document and video accessibility standards. They have also worked with Digital Education here to seek out better options for captioning services for video. All faculty workshops on the use of video include a component on Captioning, and every recording studio has signage.
    o How are we supporting the needs of our students with disabilities?
    This is an area that is changing as we speak. As we see a climb in the number of online assessments being given, our Disability Resource Center has become taxed for resources. We have been working with them to craft guidelines for faculty that have students needing services.
    3. Internal/External resources:
    o Are our instructional design, media development, and help desk resources internal or outsources?
    All internal, with the exception of Captioning, which is outsourced currently.
    o Who is teaching your courses? Full-time faculty? Adjuncts? Are any faculty only hired to teach online?
    A majority of colleges here are actively working with their full-time faculty to develop online versions of their courses. There are some pockets of adjuncts teaching online, but I have not worked with very many of them. We do have some faculty, primarily in graduate programs, that are hired to teach online sections.
    o What issues do we have around recruiting and retaining talented faculty and staff?
    Not in my realm, sorry 
    4. Online course designs:
    o How much control do your faculty have over their online courses (locked down, modifiable, faculty-built)?
    I would say faculty have complete control over their online courses unless they are teaching a section of a much larger course which has a course coordinator. In that case, they may have a locked down version, but not always. They may get a cloned copy of the Master Course, but then have freedom to change their section within whatever parameters are set by the course coordinator. Faculty completing the IMPACT program, and working through Consulting and Training, typically build their own courses. However, we also offer colleges the opportunity to enter into MOU’s to work with assigned Instructional Designers that will do the work for them, leaving them to just be the SME.
    o How do you do quality assurance in your online course
     Quality of materials
    The Associate Provost for Digital Education has established a rubric by which they assess any course offered. Typically an instructional designer will review the course, then sit down with the faculty member and determine an action plan to make changes as needed.
     Quality of activities
    Part of above
     Faculty participation/engagement (potentially controversial)
    There is a financial component to this for faculty. When the action plan is determined, the Provost has resources to offer compensation and resources to complete the Action Plan. This varies on a case by case basis.
    5. Academic Integrity in online assessments:
    o Has this been an issue at your institution?
    Knock on wood, not yet. We are trying to get ahead of the curve and are looking at a campus wide proctoring solution for online assessments.
    o What are you doing to ensure that the person is who they say they are?
    Currently it is a course by course decision. Some use ProctorU, ExamSoft, RemoteNow or Examity. Cost is usually the responsibility of the student.

    I hope others share their answers. Great discussion points!!

    Dave

    David W Huckleberry
    Information Technology at Purdue (ITaP) | Innovations in Teaching and Learning
    540 Young Hall / 155 S. Grant St
    West Lafayette, IN 47907
    V: 765-496-1256
    E: dhuckleb@purdue.edu

    Reply
  2. Plamen Miltenoff
    March 24, 2016 at 9:24 pm (2 years ago)

    From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Belskie, Matthew
    Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2016 11:38 AM
    To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
    Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Discussion Questions for Educause Connect Miami

    Nice set of questions. I think that one discussion that is helpful to people is how you do these things from a functional perspective, and then how those functional pieces translate to the work of departments/teams/individuals.

    Flipped classroom designs (where a physical redesign takes place), for instance, requires input and work from a lot of groups – faculty within the department, facilities, external vendors, classroom design staff, perhaps a teaching and learning group focused on teaching faculty to make use of the space, the registrar or whichever group is responsible for classroom assignments, and the classroom support group that will be responsible for the long-term support sustainability of the room. I’m probably missing a few people there.

    I’d be curious to see whether your conversations can generate some cheat sheets around those topics. A sort of “Who are the people in your neighborhood?” starters guide so that anyone doing these things can make sure they have all the right people at the table for each of the phases for which they are relevant.

    I may be at a different lunch table, but I think it’d be fun to have time to chat with you at some point.

    Matthew Belskie, MSIS
    Educational Technology Coordinator
    Office of Arts & Sciences Information Services
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    919.264.0846

    From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Gyorke, Allan Shawn
    Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2016 12:25 PM
    To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
    Subject: [BLEND-ONLINE] Discussion Questions for Educause Connect Miami

    Hi Everyone.

    I’m running a lunch discussion with attendees at Educause Connect Miami. I came up with some questions to prompt discussion and Jacob thought it would be good to send them to this group – both to see if you had feedback on the questions and to collect suggestions for other topics. Feel free to send me feedback privately if you like: a.gyorke@miami.edu

    Here are the questions:
    1. Flipped classroom designs:
    o Who is doing this now?
    o What kinds of support do you have?
    o Under what conditions has it been successful or unsuccessful?
    2. Accessibility on campus and online:
    o Is accessibility a core part of faculty development efforts?
    o How are we supporting the needs of our students with disabilities?
    3. Internal/External resources:
    o Are our instructional design, media development, and help desk resources internal or outsources?
    o Who is teaching your courses? Full-time faculty? Adjuncts? Are any faculty only hired to teach online?
    o What issues do we have around recruiting and retaining talented faculty and staff?
    4. Online course designs:
    o How much control do your faculty have over their online courses (locked down, modifiable, faculty-built)?
    o How do you do quality assurance in your online course
     Quality of materials
     Quality of activities
     Faculty participation/engagement (potentially controversial)
    5. Academic Integrity in online assessments:
    o Has this been an issue at your institution?
    o What are you doing to ensure that the person is who they say they are?
    These are discussion prompts. My expectation for the lunch session is that we will start with a few questions and then follow the interests of the group to further discuss one of the topics or jump to something else related to blended and online learning.

    -Allan-

    Allan Gyorke
    Assistant Vice President for Information Technology
    Chief Academic Technology Officer
    a.gyorke@miami.edu
    P: (305) 284-6101

    Reply
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