school leadership and digital storytelling

Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodríguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantú, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 6(5), 145–161. http://doi.org/10.1177/194277511100600504
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/literature.html#d
p. 149-150. Digital storytelling applies techniques that cross disciplines, fields, and subject matter. Digital storytelling pioneer Dana Atchley used the varied techniques such as case study, personal experience, introspection, life story, interviews, artifacts, cultural texts, observations, historical interaction, visual texts, and others (Lambert, 2002, 2006). Atchley’s techniques are firmly rooted in research methodology and collectively describe routine and problematic moments and meanings in individuals’ lives (Denzin & Lincoln, 2000; Lambert, 2006). Qualitative researchers often refer to this process as a bricolage, or the creation or construction from a variety of things. This bricolage helps Downloaded from jrl.sagepub.com at SAINT CLOUD STATE UNIV on June 8, 2016 Guajardo et. al./REFRAMING THE PRAXIS OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP 150 to clarify our ontologies and inform epistemologies. Ladson-Billings (2000) explained epistemologies as more than the traditional way of knowing. Instead, epistemologies are a system of knowing that has both internal logic and external validity. The assortments of experiences used to inform our way of knowing then become the deliberate choices between hegemony and liberation. This process allows individuals to move beyond a traditional epistemological stance, or what Stanley (2007) has called the master narrative. Shujaa (1997) has called it a worldview epistemology that looks at knowledge as a symbiotic interaction of how we view the world, the knowledge we possess, and the knowledge we are capable of passing on to others.
p. 156 digital storytelling has been found to help organizations understand themselves (Militello & Guajardo, 2011). When organizations delve into introspective practices through the use of digital media, small and large organizations alike invite the opportunity to learn from deep, digital reflection.

2 Comments on school leadership and digital storytelling

  1. Chae
    May 2, 2019 at 2:08 am (6 months ago)

    Guajardo et al. (2011) proposed digital storytelling as a new framework for school leadership preparation program. Digital storytelling can offer emerging educational leaders to have a better understanding of their experience and social constructs to inform their identify (Guajardo et al., 2011). Comparing to a traditional storytelling, digital storytelling helps students to build conceptual skills like understanding a narrative and using inductive reasoning to solve problems (Czarnecki, 2009). Furthermore, digital storytelling can enhance not only technology skills through the use of software, but also academic achievement, critical thinking, and learning motivation (Yang, & Wu, 2012).
    Inference:
    Czarnecki, K. (2009). Chapter 3: How Digital Storytelling Builds 21st Century Skills. Library Technology Reports, 45(7), 15–19.
    Guajardo, M., Oliver, J., Rodríguez, G., Valadez, M., Cantú, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 6(5), 145–161.
    Yang, Y. & Wu, W. (2012). Digital storytelling for enhancing student academic achievement, critical thinking, and learning motivation: A year-long experimental study. Computers & Education, 59(2), 339–352.

    Reply
    • Chae
      May 2, 2019 at 2:09 am (6 months ago)

      Inference-> Reference

      Reply

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