fake news real news

http://factitiousgame.com/

How to tell fake news from real news

Want to strengthen your own ability to tell real news from fake news? Start by asking these five questions of any news item:

Who wrote it?

identify whether the item you’re reading is a reported news article (written by a journalist with the intent to inform), a persuasive opinion piece (written by an industry expert with a point of view), or something else entirely.

What claims does it make? Real news — like these Pulitzer Prize winning articles — will include multiple primary sources when discussing a controversial claim. Fake news may include fake sources, false urls, and/or “alternative facts”

Where was it published? Real news is published by trustworthy media outlets with a strong factchecking record, such as the BBC, NPRProPublica, Mother Jones, and Wired. (To learn more about any media outlet, look at their About page and examine their published body of work.) If you get your news primarily via social media, try to verify that the information is accurate before you share it. (On Twitter, for example, you might look for the blue “verified” checkmark next to a media outlet name to doublecheck a publication source before sharing a link.)

How does it make you feel? Fake news, like all propaganda, is designed to make you feel strong emotions. So if you read a news item that makes you feel super angry, pause and take a deep breath.

watch the TED-Ed Lesson: How to choose your news. To find out more about what students need, read the Stanford University report, published here.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

1 Comment on fake news real news

  1. Plamen Miltenoff
    July 5, 2017 at 3:09 pm (5 months ago)

    To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game

    July 3, 20176:15 AM ET Tennessee Watson
    http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/07/03/533676536/test-your-fake-news-judgement-play-this-game

    Factitious. http://factitiousgame.com/

    The game’s interface mimics the dating app Tinder, which made swiping famous. On a phone, players swipe left when they think the article in front of them is fake, and right when they believe it’s real.

    Depending on how you swipe, Factitious provides feedback. Whether your swipe was correct or incorrect, whether the article cites sources that can be checked, whether the story includes direct quotes from credible sources.

    Reply

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