Searching for "assessment"

electronic portfolio: resources

ePortfolio for the Assessment of Learning 

http://www.futured.com/documents/FuturEdePortfolioforAssessmentWhitePaper.pdf

http://www.myefolio.com/
http://chalkandwire.com/index.php/product

A Survey of the Electronic Portfolio Market Sector: Analysis and Surprising Trends

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2011/10/12/a-survey-of-the-electronic-portfolio-market-sector.aspx

FolioTek, Columbia, Missouri, ePortfolio launch in 2001. Sells in U.S. with interest in expanding globally.

Livetext, LaGrange, IL, founded in 1998. New product: Field Experience Module. Smart phone app: iPad, iPhone, Android. Mostly U.S., but expanding in South America and the Middle East. Easy tie-in to accreditation agencies and their standards. Individual accounts. New release start of 2012. Started in K-12, moved focus to higher education, now exploring K-12 once again, starting with teacher education.

RCampus, produced by Reazon Systems, Santa Ana, CA. Software development started in 1999,

Desire2Learn, Kitchener, Ontario also Baltimore, MD, with offices around the world, founded in 1999. Sells worldwide, latest release for the electronic portfolio (ver. 3.5) was in August 2011. Electronic portfolio and the D2L LMS are bundled; each leverages functionalities from the other. ePortfolio moving to hosting service and individual accounts soon.

Digication, Providence, RI and Palo Alto, CA, founded 2002. Is in partnership with Google Apps. Individual accounts; institution keeps assessment data; individual keeps ePortfolio functionality. Through Google Apps: free digital accounts with Digication (no assessment management functions with these accounts). “Three or four clicks and Digication is enabled.” Almost daily updates. Smart phone app: IOS and Android. Contact jyan@digication.com.

Learning Objects, producers of Campus Pack, in Washington, DC, with employees around the world, founded in 2003.

TaskStream, New York City, organized 1998, founded 2000, markets internationally, versions available in a variety of languages. Offers separate platforms, AMS (Accountability Management System) and LAT (Learning Achievement Tools); each is multi-component.

Longsight, based in Ohio with offices in NY, IN, OH, WI, and CA, founded in 1978, a service provider for open source solutions. Supports both the Open Source Portfolio (OSP) and Sakai, within which OSP is embedded.

Chalk & Wire, Ridgeway, Ontario, Canada;

NobleHour, produced by TreeTop Software, in Lakeland, FL, founded in 2011

Sherston, Tag Developments, the assessment division of Sherston Software, Ltd., providers of Red Pen Tool: http://www.maps-ict.com/redpentool.mov, of LiveAssess: http://www.maps-ict.com/liveassess.mov, and of MAPS 3: http://www.maps-ict.com/maps3.mov.

PebblePad from PebbleLearning, in Telford, UK, with office in Australia, founded in 2003. Most popular ePortfolio in the U.K. and Australia,

Symplicity, in Arlington, VA, offers an electronic portfolio (http://www.symplicity.com/reflection) but it is only one among dozens of products that Symplicity offers–all of them are management tools for higher education (see http://www.symplicity.com/products). Good example of separating products to support a single function.

Blackboard

eFolioWorld, technology from Avenet, the Minnesota Colleges and Universities portfolio system,

iWebFolio, from Nuventive. Also known for TracDat, marketed since the 1990s, Nuventive founded 2000.

Epsilen,

Mahara,

eLumen,

A survey of e-pdp and e-portfolio practice in UK Higher Education

http://www.islamicstudiesnetwork.ac.uk/assets/documents/pdp/survey_of_epdp_and_eportfolio_practice_in_uk_higher_education.pdf

p. 10 and p. 18 offer questionnaires for assessment

Exploring Faculty Perceptions of ePortfolio Use and Its Relationship to Faculty Teaching Beliefs

http://ncepr.org/finalreports/WSUfinalreport.pdf

p. 3 questionnaire  p. 5

copyright, fair use in education: the consequences of the Georgia State Case

From: lrs_l-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu [mailto:lrs_l-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu] On Behalf Of Ewing, M Keith
Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 11:15 AM
To: lrs_l@stcloudstate.edu
Subject: [LRS_l] Important copyright ruling

Last Friday the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its ruling in Cambridge University Press et al., v. Patton (an appeal of the Georgia State Case which had been adjudicated in 2012 by the District Court in Atlanta).  Nancy Sims (UMinnesota) has written an interesting and thorough summary and assessment of the ruling and its importance.  See http://blog.lib.umn.edu/copyrightlibn/2014/10/11th-circuit-gsu-ruling.html.   The ruling itself (all 129 pages) can be found at http://media.ca11.uscourts.gov/opinions/pub/files/201214676.pdf.

keith

Keith Ewing

Professor, Library Systems & Digital Projects

Previous IMS entries regrading copyright:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=copyright

lib instruction revisited

Rethinking Library Instruction: Libraries as Social Learning Centers

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx

eCourse outline

Part 1: Introduction and Engagement—Getting Users through the Door

  • A brief overview of how library instruction has developed for more than 100 years
  • A brief review of how library instructions is evolving to meet users’ changing needs
  • Identifying what must be learned and how we can encourage effective learning (needs assessment)

Part 2: Preparing for Delivery—Thinking from a User-Centric Point of View

  • A brief overview of instructional design techniques
  • Thinking about the audience and how to create learning opportunities that stick
  • The importance of preparation

Part 3: Delivering Learning for Positive Results—Providing Learning that Lasts

  • Creating learning environments that facilitate success
  • Keeping learners awake and engaged
  • Encouraging learning through facilitation of discussion and exploration
  • Setting learners up for success

Part 4: The End is The Beginning: Libraries as Onsite-Online Social Learning Centers

  • What to do when formal learning ends and learners leave the learning face-to-face or online learning space
  • Providing a place where learners can succeed
  • Evaluating for success
  • Returning to the beginning with new and improved learning opportunities

 

Full Spectrum Lights in Miller Center

From: lrs_l-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu [mailto:lrs_l-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu] On Behalf Of Hubbs, Susan
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 5:38 PM
To: Northenscold, Melissa A.; lrs_l@stcloudstate.edu
Subject: [LRS_l] Re: Full Spectrum Lights in MC – Brainstorm Session Monday

Dear Colleagues,

I have started a bibliography beginning with books and articles that LRS owns or has access. I have not prettied it up. I will send a copy to Missy. Missy, I also went and pulled the 3 books LRS owns off the shelf. They are on a chair in my office. I will also look for some good websites and add those.

Dr. Norman E. Rosenthal, MD is one of the leaders in this field.  LRS owns his Winter Blues book, 1998 but he now has a newer edition.
Winter Blues, Fourth Edition: Everything You Need to Know to Beat Seasonal Affective Disorder., Sept. 2012. I would like to suggest that LRS purchases a copy.  In the older edition, chapter 7 is entirely about light therapy.

Because light therapy is used as part, or sometimes all, treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) which can also be part of a larger concern of depression, there should be a large sign encouraging people to seek out help from the SCSU counseling center, suicide prevention hotline, other depression URLs, etc.

Yours thinking of Robin Williams.

Susan

Susan Hubbs

Professor

Miller Center Library

320.308.4996

shubbs@stcloudstate.edu

 

 


From: lrs_l-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu [lrs_l-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu] on behalf of Northenscold, Melissa A.
Sent: Friday, September 12, 2014 10:59 AM
To: lrs_l@stcloudstate.edu
Subject: [LRS_l] Full Spectrum Lights in MC – Brainstorm Session Monday

In partnership with the Counseling and Psychological Services department, we will have full spectrum lights in the Miller Center (in the space to the south to the Dean’s Office) from roughly October 1 thru roughly May 1.

 

You are invited to join a brainstorming session at 1 p.m. on Monday in MC 135G.  We will discuss ideas regarding placement of lights, layout of space, promotion/marketing, and assessment.  Please feel free to send ideas via email as well.  If you’re not available to attend on Monday, but interested in getting involved, I will send notes after the meeting that include the next meeting date.

 

********************************

Missy Northenscold

Administrative Director

Learning Resources Services

St. Cloud State University

720 4th Ave S., MC 135E

St. Cloud, MN 56301

(320) 308-2022

Publishing opportunity – Digital Badges in Education

Please use this IMS blog, for more on digital badges in education:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges

Interesting opinion why badges will not work, unless adopted by the entire institution in the following webinar: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/04/gamification-its-easier-than-you-think/

From: Zane Berge [mailto:berge@umbc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2014 10:16 AM
Subject: Call for Chapters – Digital Badges in Education: Trends, Issues, and Cases

Dear Authors,

You are invited to submit a chapter proposal for a book, Digital Badges in Education: Trends, Issues, and Cases that Lin Muilenburg and I are editing that will be published by Routledge. Please see the call for chapters at: http://bit.ly/CFC_DBiE

Feel free to pass this call along to anyone or any group you believe would be interested.

Regards,
Zane
Zane L. Berge, Ph.D.
Professor of Education
berge@umbc.edu
Twitter: @ZaneBerge

Share, if you are using badges as part of the assessment process in your class and/or if you intend to start using it.

Let us know, if you would like to start discussion on this campus about adoption of badges as part of the assessment process.

http://badges.actfl.org/badges-infographic.pdf

digital badges how it works

Improving Test Question Quality

Improving Test Question Quality

http://www.ncsu.edu/it/open_source/Item.html

Formative assessment will be of increasing importance

test item quality is crucial

as part of the TLT Group fall series: http://connectpro86502729.adobeconnect.com/frlvfall2014/

Gaming and Education: Resources

Gaming Learning Society
https://www.gameslearningsociety.org/

Report from the intersection of Games, Learning, and Society
http://remakelearning.org/blog/2014/06/19/games-learning-society-recap/
Games, Learning and Society conference in Madison, Wisconsin. practical ideas and arguments from GLS to help you get through the roadblocks that stand between you and learning or teaching through games.

keywords: gamification + library in Twitter:
Readers Save Legacy Library Content by Crowdsourcing Metadata Games
http://www.gamification.co/2014/05/12/readers-save-legacy-content-by-crowdsourcing-metadata-games/What is Gamification and Why Use It in Teaching?
http://ii.library.jhu.edu/2014/05/13/what-is-gamification-and-why-use-it-in-teaching/What Does the Next-Generation School Library Look Like?
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/what-does-the-next-generation-school-library-look-like/
The library now also has reading lounge areas with comfortable modular seating, as well as tables with chairs and stools that students are free to move around; two music studios; a HackerSpace (with high-tech equipment such as a microscope, 3D printer, gaming hardware and software, and a green screen for filming) and a Maker Space that also houses a 3D printer and serves as a “hands-on” craft room where old technology can be disassembled and re-configured with other materials. In short, the Monticello Library Media Center has become a “Learning Commons.”

following now @valibrarian because of MineCraft http://t.co/RnwW7ahOK2
Minecraft and the library: http://blogs.curtin.edu.au/gamification/news/minecraft-and-the-library/

Library Quest Wrap-Up and Post-Game Assessment
https://babeltech.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/library-quest-wrap-up-and-post-game-assessment/

If you build it …? One campus’ firsthand account of gamification in the academic library
http://crln.acrl.org/content/74/4/208.full
Straight from CRL News
SCVNGR as a platform was attractive to us for several reasons, including UCSD’s experience. First, it incorporated gaming into students’ experience of the library, which has been widely explored and recommended as a way to engage library patrons.2,3 Second, it would enable us to connect with students early in the year without needing to commit personnel to lengthy tours and other scheduled services during a busy time.

Pls consider former IMS blog entries. Keyword: “game”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=game

 

BYOD toolchest: 51 teaching and learning tools for mobile devices

The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now)

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/the-epic-byod-toolchest-vicki-davis

Formative Assessment

Screencasting and Capturing What Happens in Class

Content-Sharing Platforms

  • Sophia: Nudged along by my friend Todd Nesloney, I use Sophia for my computer applications instruction and am very pleased with the results.
  • Haiku Learning: This is the full content management system that I’m trying to get our school to adopt. It’s multiplatform and robust, which makes it a great fit for our BYOD environment.

There are many other apps like MoodleCanvas, and Coursesites. The point is that you should have one in a BYOD environment.

Assessment Aids

All three of these apps — Quick KeyGrade Ninja, and WISE — are available on iTunes and Google Play, but there are more.

Electronic Note Taking

Expression

Students need multiple ways to share and express themselves, particularly verbally and with pictures. This is part of transliteracy.

Cloud Syncing

Graphic Design and Infographics

Color Selection

Presentations

Blogging

Written Expression

Link Sharing

More  (from the blog section)

If you’re working with multiple apps like Google Drive, Dropbox, One Drive, Evernote and need to search across them in one shot, take a look at Xendo (http://xen.do) – gives you a personal, private Google-like search across all your apps.

8 Interactive Video Tools for Engaging Learners

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/film-festival-interactive-video-tools-resources

The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/05/the-5-step-model-to-teach-students.html

1- Determine learning objectives
This is the initial phase where you need to identify the behaviours you want your students to exhibit and work on encapsulating these behaviours in an overarching higher order thinking schema.
2-Teach through questioning
The importance of integrating questions into instruction is uncontested. Thought-provoking questions help students explore learning from different perspectives. The art of posing well-formulated questions is regaled by a set of techniques, some of which are included in this wonderful poster: Questions A Critical Thinker Asks.
3-Practice before you assess
This is where hands-on learning activities are called for. To consolidate their understandings and therefore increase the retention rate of information taught, students need to utilize all components of active learning such as simulation, experimentations,rehearsing…etc

Related: The 8 Elements of The Critical Thinking Process

4- Review, refine, and improve
Students’ feedback that you can garner either formally or informally constitute the backbone of your teaching procedure. It provides you with insights into areas that students need help with and also informs your teaching objectives and methodology. There are a variety of tools you can use to collect feedback from your students, check out the  8 Practical tools to easily gather students feedback.
5- Provide feedback and assessment of learning
As you need students feedback to help you inform your teaching methodology, students too  need your feedback. They need to learn how they are learning and assess their overall achievement. One way to do this is to provide them with grading rubrics for self-assessment. Here are some other resources to help you provide better feedback to your students:

MOOC and Libraries

MOOC and Libraries

http://explore.tandfonline.com/content/bes/moocsandlibraries

New ACRL Discussion Group—Library Support for MOOCs

Libraries in the Time of MOOCs

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/libraries-time-moocs
issues related to MOOCs, such as intellectual property rights, privacy issues, and state regulations.
MOOCs have arrived on the scene at a time when many institutions of higher learning are in extreme financial crisis
OCLC conference, “MOOCs and Libraries: Massive Opportunity or Overwhelming Challenge? http://www.oclc.org/research/events/2013/03-18.html
The MOOC movement might change this copyright-ownership contract between university and faculty.

Stephens, M. m., & Jones, K. L. (2014). MOOCs as LIS Professional Development Platforms: Evaluating and Refining SJSU’s First Not-for-Credit MOOC. Journal Of Education For Library & Information Science, 55(4), 345-361.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d99055676%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
xMOOCs. Using central­ized learning platforms (e.g., Coursera),they emphasize individual learning usingautomated assessment tools.In contrast, cMOOCs stress the relation­ship between course content and a com­munity of learners. Social learning, in thecase of cMOOCs, is emphasized  through uses of distributed tools (e.g., a combina­tion of a course site, student blogs, andsocial  etworking sites) to build networks of knowledge and learners. Unlike their xMOOC counterparts, the role of an in­ istructor in a cMOOC is to be a “guide on the side,” a facilitator of the knowledge­ making process who uses connectivist learning theory (Siemens, 2004; Siemens,2012)

Learning 2.0 programs, also known as“23 Things,” have offered online technol­ogy-focused  professional development for library staff and could be considered an early version of LIS-focused MOOCs (Stephens, 2013a). Utilizing concepts such as self-directed learning, play, and an emphasis on lifelong learning, these pro­grams have been offered for individual li­braries as well as consortial  and state level iterations to reach thousands of library staff.
The course structure of the MOOCversion of the HL incorporated content updated from the SLIS course by the co­instructors. Ten modules were scheduled over a twelve-week “semester.” Students
could earn a certificate of completion, if they finished three of five artifact-based assignments of their choosing, in addition to blogging and participating in an end-of-course virtual symposium. The weekly schedule is available in Appendix A, and assignment descriptions are available in Appendix B
utilizing concepts such as self-directed learning, play, and an emphasis on lifelong learning, these pro­grams have been offered for individual li­braries as well as consortial and state level iterations to reach thousands of library staff. Benefits to staff include increased comfort with emerging technologies and an increased desire to continue learning (p. 348).

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