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Credly Badges on Canvas

Credly Badges Now Available Through Canvas

By Rhea Kelly 01/09/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/09/credly-badges-now-available-through-canvas.aspx

Students can now earn digital badges when they complete modules in Canvas, thanks to a new partnership between Credly and the learning management system from Instructure.

“Digital badges are a powerful and employer-friendly complement to grades and other information traditionally found on a college transcript,” said Brenda Perea, instructional design project manager at Colorado Community College System, which deployed an early pilot of Credly Learning Edition for Canvas.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

Canvas as LE (learning environment)

Canvas as a Learning Environment

Do you have a class in Canvas? Invite me. As a students, teacher, does not matter. I will be your guinea pig and will be giving you feedback. And vice versa.

Here is my invitation for you in EdPuzzle: nobenes is the code and the link is: https://edpuzzle.com/join/nobenes

I have not touched Canvas for good two years. Last semester, I put my egg in the Google “basket.”

I see that EdPuzzle will be adding video soon. I am fairly serious that they are competing with Zaption, which just released Zaption Presenter, which is practically a mashup of video by your choice, either uploaded by you or mashedup from YouTube and super-imposed quizzing feature such as Kahoot: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/19/zaption-presenter/

Google, with Google Hangouts and Google Classroom (Google Drive/Google Forms and bunch other stuff) might be exactly what you are looking in Canvas with badges and EddPuzzle?
Just a thought, I am more keen now to explore w you the combination Canvas/EddPuzzle/Badges

More about Canvas in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=canvas&submit=Search

Teaching and Learning + Student Success

EDUCAUSE Academic Communities: Teaching and Learning + Student Success

https://events.educause.edu/webinar/2020/educause-academic-communities-teaching-and-learning-student-success

Tuesday, February 25, 2020, at 12:00 pm,
Miller Center, MC 205, the SCSU Professional Development Room
(how to get there? https://youtu.be/jjpLR3FnBLI  )

You will receive an email from Canvas Catalog when you have been granted access to the event website. This site includes live event login details, program and speaker information, and technical requirements.

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My notes from the Adobe Connect webinar

Malcolm Brown (MB) and Kathe Pelletier (KP)campus outcomes

 

 

John Martin, UW-Madison: Interesting that “Student Success” = retention. I feel retention = org success.

Cindy Auclair: Cindy Auclair – ASU – Retention is important that goes hand in hand with well-being.

Kathy Fernandes, CSU Chico: Not sure how one would measure Becoming a Citizen? We do have public Debates, Town Hall, etc. to engage with community.

Lisa Durff: I thought of digital citizenship

assessment

Jim J – MiraCosta: “as a part of teaching and learning” is a real gray area –

Jim J – MiraCosta: We may measure all of these, but there is very little formality around “teaching and learning”

Lisa Durff: very few measure instructor satisfaction

work together

 

student success after 2017 shifts from SS and technology to SS and other issues

digital transformation

why tech adoption doesn’t equal digital transformation. article from Forbes. MB: it is not for sale, cannot buy. not a product, but deep and coordinated shifts: culture, workforce, technology.

student success

 

 

ask for EDUCAUSE Academic Communities PDF document

Malcolm Brown: 2019 Horizon Report https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/4/2019-horizon-report

Malcolm Brown: Transforming Higher Ed blog https://er.educause.edu/columns/transforming-higher-ed

Malcolm Brown: EDUCAUSE Student Success https://library.educause.edu/topics/information-technology-management-and-leadership/student-success

https://www.educause.edu/research-and-publications/research/core-data-service

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more on Educause in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educause

Spring Convocation 2020: Microcredentialing

Digital Badging and Microcredentialing

short link to this blog entry: http://bit.ly/convocation2020

for backchanneling, pls join us on Zoom: https://minnstate.zoom.us/my/badge or 9107443388
if you want to review the Zoom recording, pls click here:
https://minnstate.zoom.us/rec/share/4vF1N-719m9Oc4XE0VrHApU-OKLLaaa8gyEbqfFcz07WTblhxr6U38pBGqPneM2F

Presenters: Kannan Sivaprakasam & Plamen Mittenoff

https://mnscu-my.sharepoint.com/:p:/r/personal/yg5734wd_minnstate_edu/Documents/conferences%20grants/grants/microcredentials%20grant%20Kannan/Digital%20Badges%20and%20Microcredentialing%20edit%20pm.pptx?d=w88cb0067fc90407fa89fafc9e6496882&csf=1&e=BJXpP6

1. Share your ideas and practice of badge distribution and/or microcredentialing
2. What is a digital badge/microcredentialing?
3. How to create and award D2L digital badges for your class?
4. How to motivate the students in earning digital badges?
5. How it aligns with COSE’s strategic plan 2022/Husky Compact?

What we hope to achieve
• Create a community of digital badgers
• Catalyze professional development opportunity for faculty/staff

Literature and additional information:

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View this post on Instagram

At #convication2020, Dr. Kannan Sivaprakasam and Dr. Plamen Miltenoff discussed achievements from the @minnstateedu innovation grant #badges #digitalbadges and #microcredentials. For more info, pls visit http://burly/convocation2020. @scsu_soe @scsualumni @scsusopa @scsucla @scsucareer @scsumasscomm @scsustudentgovernment @scsucose @scsu_chemistry_club

A post shared by Digital literacy at SCSU (@scsutechinstruct) on

 

Note taking in classes

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/48902/digital-note-taking-strategies-that-deepen-student-thinking

Mueller and Oppenheimer’s (2014) “The Pen is Mightier than the Keyboard” as well as Carter, Greenberg and Walker’s (2016) “Effect of Computer Usage on Academic Performance.” claim that students in lecture-style courses perform worse on assessments when allowed to use devices for note taking.

However, none of these studies question the teaching methods used in the classes themselves or whether teachers are recognizing the power of digital devices for students to create, share, connect and discover information.

Digital Organization and Content Curation

Much like students understand the concept of binders, notebooks and notes in the physical world, they need a similar system in the digital one. Whether working with dividers and subjects in a tool like Notability or sections and pages in OneNote, students need to build vocabulary to support how they house their learning.

Tagging this way not only helps students stay organized, but it could also help them to examine trends across courses or even semesters.

As a doctoral student, I use OneNote. First, I create a new digital notebook each year. Inside that, I add sections for each term as well as my different courses. Finally, my notes get organized into individual pages within the sections. When I can recall the precise location where I put a particular set of notes, I navigate directly to that page. However, on the numerous occasions when an author, vocabulary term or concept seems familiar but I cannot recall the precise moment when I took notes, then the search function becomes critical.

Multimodal Notes

With most tools (Notability, OneNote, Evernote, etc.), students can not only capture typed and handwritten notes but also incorporate photos, audio and even video. These versatile capabilities allow students to customize their note taking process to meet their learning needs. Consider these possibilities:

  • Students may take notes on paper, add photos of those papers into a digital notebook, synthesize their thinking with audio or written notes, and then tag their digital notes for later retrieval.
  • Students might use audio syncing — a feature that records audio and then digitally syncs it with whatever the student writes or types — to capture the context of the class discussion or lecture. When reviewing their notes, students could click or tap on their notes and then jump directly to that point in the audio recording.
  • Teachers might provide students with their presentation slides or other note taking guides as PDF files. Now, students can focus on taking notes — using any modality — for synthesis, elaboration, reflection or analysis rather than in an attempt to capture content verbatim.

In 1949, neuropsychologist Donald Hebb famously wrote, “Neurons that fire together wire together.”

Concept Mapping

One of the powerful components of digital note taking is that the pages never end, and a full page isn’t an artificial barrier to limit thinking. Students can work on an infinitely expanding canvas to include as much information as they need. For example, concept mapping tools such as Coggle or Padlet allow students to create networks of ideas using text, links, images and even video without ever running out of room. (my note to John Eller – can we renew our 201-2013 discussion about pen vs computer concept mapping?)

Visible Thinking Routines

Visible Thinking routines, sets of questions designed by researchers at Harvard’s Project Zero, encourage thinking and support student inquiry.

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more on note taking in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=note+taking

influential tools for online learning

Online Learning’s ‘Greatest Hits’

Robert Ubell (Columnist)     Feb 20, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-02-20-online-learning-s-greatest-hits

dean of web-based distance learning

Learning Management Systems

Neck and neck for the top spot in the LMS academic vendor race are Blackboard—the early entry and once-dominant player—and coming-up quickly from behind, the relatively new contender, Canvas, each serving about 6.5 million students . The LMS market today is valued at $9.2 billion.

Digital Authoring Systems

Faced with increasingly complex communication technologies—voice, video, multimedia, animation—university faculty, expert in their own disciplines, find themselves technically perplexed, largely unprepared to build digital courses.

instructional designers, long employed by industry, joined online academic teams, working closely with faculty to upload and integrate interactive and engaging content.

nstructional designers, as part of their skillset, turned to digital authoring systems, software introduced to stimulate engagement, encouraging virtual students to interface actively with digital materials, often by tapping at a keyboard or touching the screen as in a video game. Most authoring software also integrates assessment tools, testing learning outcomes.

With authoring software, instructional designers can steer online students through a mixtape of digital content—videos, graphs, weblinks, PDFs, drag-and-drop activities, PowerPoint slides, quizzes, survey tools and so on. Some of the systems also offer video editing, recording and screen downloading options

Adaptive Learning

As with a pinwheel set in motion, insights from many disciplines—artificial intelligence, cognitive science, linguistics, educational psychology and data analytics—have come together to form a relatively new field known as learning science, propelling advances in a new personalized practice—adaptive learning.

MOOCs

Of the top providers, Coursera, the Wall Street-financed company that grew out of the Stanford breakthrough, is the champion with 37 million learners, followed by edX, an MIT-Harvard joint venture, with 18 million. Launched in 2013, XuetangX, the Chinese platform in third place, claims 18 million.

Former Yale President Rick Levin, who served as Coursera’s CEO for a few years, speaking by phone last week, was optimistic about the role MOOCs will play in the digital economy. “The biggest surprise,” Levin argued, “is how strongly MOOCs have been accepted in the corporate world to up-skill employees, especially as the workforce is being transformed by job displacement. It’s the right time for MOOCs to play a major role.”

In virtual education, pedagogy, not technology, drives the metamorphosis from absence to presence, illusion into reality. Skilled online instruction that introduces peer-to-peer learning, virtual teamwork and other pedagogical innovations stimulate active learning. Online learning is not just another edtech product, but an innovative teaching practice. It’s a mistake to think of digital education merely as a device you switch on and off like a garage door.

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

change in the K12 sector

Twelve Years Later: What’s Really Changed in the K-12 Sector? (Part 1)

By Dave Stevenson     Apr 3, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-04-03-twelve-years-later-what-s-really-changed-in-the-k-12-sector-part-1

In fall 2007, Larry Berger, CEO of Wireless Generation (now Amplify) was invited to submit a paper to an “Entrepreneurship in Education”

As education entrepreneurs know, growth in K-12 comes hard. Sometimes very hard. We were living Marc Andreessen’s startup mantra: “You only ever experience two emotions: euphoria and terror.”

The edtech boom of the past two decades promised efficacy and new instructional models. Many teachers instead experience it as “clutter.” But poorly integrated standards, curriculum, assessment, and intervention materials have always been a problem.

When it comes to instruction, the work consists of four segments: core curriculum, supplemental (intervention, test prep, little books) curriculum, assessment, and technology (hardware, infrastructure and connectivity). Each of these workstreams are run by separate teams, using independent funding streams, only rarely coordinating. Schools rely—as they always have—on the hero in the classroom, who has to somehow synthesize everything for a roomful of children, every single day.

Twelve Years Later: How the K-12 Industry and Investment Landscape Has Shifted (Part 2)

By Dave Stevenson     Apr 5, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-04-05-twelve-years-later-how-the-k-12-industry-and-investment-landscape-has-shifted-part-2

Twelve years ago, Amplify CEO Larry Berger and I wrote about the “pareto distribution” of companies in the K-12 sector.

The “oligopoly” was the natural outcome of a highly decentralized system and fragmented demand. To serve 15,000-plus districts and more than 100,000 school buildings, a company needed huge sales and service teams; to afford them, the company needed a bookbag full of products across content areas, grade ranges, and use cases. The structure of demand created the “Big Three”—McGraw-Hill, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Pearson.

Meanwhile, the number of small players—further right on the pareto distribution—has grown dramatically. Online distribution and freemium business models have enabled companies like Flocabulary, Newsela, Nearpod, and others

few alternative models to consider:
companies like Remind, ClassDojo, and Edmodo, who all adopted a “West Coast” approach: collect active users now, with plans to monetize later.

The second includes the “platform” players—Schoology, itslearning, Canvas, and other LMS-like platforms. They have set out to do something differently, only possible by means of technology—to be the search, storage and distribution platform for instructional content.  Google Classroom has instead emerged as the de facto standard platform, fueled by the runaway adoption of Chromebooks.

The third includes “policy responsive” players—companies like Panorama, Ellevation or Wireless Generation. hese companies help school systems meet a new policy requirement—social-emotional learning, English Language Learning, and reading assessment, respectively.

capital investment K12 US education

But we’re not “decluttering” our classrooms or in our schools. What would it take for the private and public sectors to work shoulder-to-shoulder?
a catch-22: so long as buying is fragmented, it’s hard to justify the integrated product investment; so long as products are fragmented, it’s hard for a district to create an integrated instructional model.

Bryan Alexander EdTech class

Follow Along With a Grad Seminar About Edtech: Part 1, Picking the Best Tech

By Bryan Alexander     Mar 12, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-03-12-follow-along-with-a-grad-seminar-about-edtech-part-1-picking-the-best-tech

a tech catalog for students to explore and choose from, partially based on Georgetown’s enterprise suite, including a learning management system (Canvas), blogging (WordPress or other), student-run web domains, web annotation (Hypothesis) https://web.hypothes.is/, collaborative writing (Google Suite), discussion boards (Discourse), and videoconferencing (Zoom).

Neil Selwyn’s excellent Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates.

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How Can Digital Audio Enhance Teaching and Learning?

By Bryan Alexander     Mar 28, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-03-28-grad-seminar-on-edtech-part-2-how-can-digital-audio-enhance-teaching-and-learning

Before there were podcasts, there was pirate radio, rogue broadcasters flinging unusual sounds over borders and adding new music to cultures. And before that there was the “theater of the mind,” harnessing radio’s deep power to inspire listeners’ imaginations.

Then we advanced to podcasting’s second wave—the one we’re enjoying now—the one sparked by Serial’s massive success in 2014. When you consider audiobooks in the mix, it’s clear how varied and mainstream portable digital audio is today.

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https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-04-18-video-assignments-are-the-new-term-paper-how-does-that-change-teaching-and-learning

Digital video has taken the world by storm. Netflix is busy changing television and movies. YouTube may be humanity’s largest collaborative cultural project, aggregating an astonishing amount of user-generated content. The Google-owned service is widely used that it may already soak up more than a third of all mobile traffic.

Unsurprisingly, we increasingly learn from digital video. The realm of informal learning is well represented on YouTube—from DIY instruction to guerrilla recordings of public speakers. Traditional colleges now rely on digital video, too, as campuses have established official channels and faculty regularly turn to YouTube for content. And new kinds of educational institutions have emerged, like the nonprofit Khan Academy,

We also explored the rise of teaching via live video. More colleges are using it for online learning, since it can make students and instructors more present to each other than most other media. We also saw videoconferencing’s usefulness in connecting students and faculty when separated by travel, illness or scheduling challenges.

Our readings—Zac Woolfitt’s “The effective use of video in higher education,” and Michelle Kosalka’s “Using Synchronous Tools to Build Community in the Asynchronous Online Classroom”—and discussion identified a range of limitations to video’s utility. Videoconferencing requires robust internet connection that not all students have access to, and even downloading video clips can be challenging on some connections. People are not always comfortable appearing on camera. And some content is not well suited to video, such as mostly audio conversations or still images.

Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer

What’s the Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer?

Research from the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) has been transferred to EDUCAUSE, including a report on the role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer and its differences and similarities to other higher ed IT tech executives.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/1/the-center-for-higher-education-cio-studies-reports-2003-2018 Friday, January 18, 2019

The Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) was a nonprofit organization founded by Dr. Wayne A. Brown, dedicated to the education and development of technology leaders in higher education. CHECS produced the CIO Study, the Technology Leadership (TL) Study, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Study and the Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study.

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) study provides information about higher education CIOs’ attributes, education, experience and effectiveness. The CIO study was conducted from 2003 to 2018. Find all the CIO reports here.

The Technology Leadership (TL) study surveyed those in the next organizational layer down from the CIO.  The TL study examines the demographics of the TL, where they have worked, and the activities they are undertaking to prepare themselves to become CIOs.  The TL study was study was conducted from 2009 to 2018. Find all the TL reports here.

The Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) study examines the demographics of the higher education CISO, the career route they have taken to their role, and the activities and attributes needed for a CISO according to the CISO and the CIO. The CISO study was study was conducted from 2014 to 2017. Find all the CISO reports here.

The Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study, 2018 canvassed CIOs, known CATOs and academic technology leaders, as well as deans and provosts to understand changes happening across institutions of higher education in academic technology.

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