Searching for "drone"

3D printing, drones and wearable

CoSN 2015: The Emerging Tech That’s Transforming K–12’s Horizon

One year or less (2015–2016):

  • BYOD
  • Cloud computing
  • Makerspaces
  • Mobile learning

Two to three years (2017–2018):

  • 3D printing/rapid prototyping
  • Adaptive learning technologies
  • Information visualization
  • Learning analytics

Four to five years (2019–2020):

  • Badges/Microcredit
  • Drones
  • Visual data analysis
  • Wearable technology

The NMC’s interim K–12 Horizon Report can be downloaded for free.

Drone wars:

Google Inc (GOOGL) and Amazon.com, Inc. (AMZN)’s Forthcoming Drone Wars

http://www.techinsider.net/google-inc-googl-and-amazon-com-inc-amzns-forthcoming-drone-wars/1114967.html

Please consider other IMS postings on drones:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/08/27/faa-has-commercial-drone-regulations-backwards/

FAA Has Commercial Drone Regulations Backwards

Drone entrepreneurs frustrated as FAA regulation remains up in the air

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/drones-unmanned-aircraft-pushing-limits-of-the-law/

FAA Has Commercial Drone Regulations Backwards

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregorymcneal/2014/07/01/faa-struggling-to-deal-with-drones-now-going-after-realtors-and-farmers/

The FAA’s position is as simple as it is inane.  If a realtor films buildings for fun using a remote controlled quadcopter that’s legal.  But if she takes that same quadcopter and films buildings as part of her job, that is illegal.  If a farmer flies a model aircraft over his cornfield doing barrel rolls and loops, that’s legal.  But if he uses the same model airplane to determine how to conserve water or use less fertilizer that’s illegal.  This is government regulation at its worst.

The FAA decision is a reversal from the initiatives entertained at different universities:

Drone Technology Advancements Yield New Education Opportunities

http://www.govtech.com/education/Drone-Technology-Advancements-Yield-New-Education-Opportunities-.html

Two universities operate drones and teach journalism students how to use them

http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2013/02/26/two-universities-operate-drones-and-teach-journalism-students-how-to-use-them

read more:

U.S. Lags As Commercial Drones Take Off Around Globe

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/17/us-drones-_n_4978768.html

Please Don’t Be the One to Get Drones Banned

http://petapixel.com/2014/08/27/take-get-drones-banned/

 

 

 

 

punitive and surveillance society

The Counterrevolution: How Our Government Went to War Against Its Own Citizens(Basic Books, 2018)

https://cccct.law.columbia.edu/people/bernard-e-harcourt

https://theintercept.com/2018/11/25/counterinsurgency-us-drone-strikes/

+++++++++
more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

Library 2.0 Emerging Technologies

third Library 2.019 mini-conference: “Emerging Technology,” which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, October 30th, from 12:00 – 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).

Tomorrow’s technologies are shaping our world today, revolutionizing the way we live and learn. Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Blockchain, Internet of Things, Drones, Personalization, the Quantified Self. Libraries can and should be the epicenter of exploring, building and promoting these emerging techs, assuring the better futures and opportunities they offer are accessible to everyone. Learn what libraries are doing right now with these cutting-edge technologies, what they’re planning next and how you can implement these ideas in your own organization.

This is a free event, being held live online and also recorded.
REGISTER HERE

Innovative Pedagogy

Rebecca Ferguson
  • Senior lecturer in the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) at The Open University in the UK
  • Senior fellow of the Higher Education Academy
TODAY, Thursday at 1:00 PM CT
JOIN HERE
This Week:
An interactive discussion on the Innovating Pedagogy 2019 report from The Open University
About the Guest
Rebecca is a senior lecturer in the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) at The Open University in the UK and a senior fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Her primary research interests are educational futures, and how people learn together online and I supervise doctoral students in both these areas.
Rebecca worked for several years as a researcher and educator on the Schome project, which focuses on educational futures, and was also the research lead on the SocialLearn online learning platform, and learning analytics lead on the Open Science Lab (Outstanding ICT Initiative of the Year: THE Awards 2014). She is currently a pedagogic adviser to the FutureLearn MOOC platform, and evaluation lead on The Open University’s FutureLearn MOOCs. She is an active member of the Society for Learning Analytics Research, and have co-chaired many learning analytics events, included several associated with the Learning Analytics Community Exchange (LACE), European Project funded under Framework 7.
Rebecca’s most recent book, Augmented Education, was published by Palgrave in spring 2014.
++++++++++++++++++++
My notes
innovative assessment is needed for innovative pedagogy.
Analytics. what is I want to know about my learning (from the learner’s perspective)
Ray Garcelon
How is “stealth assessment” unique compared to formative assessment?
students teaching robots
learning analytics, Rebecca is an authority.
how to assess resources are trustworthy, fake news and social media, navigating post-truth society
how to advance the cause of empathy through technological means
gamification. XR safer environment. digital storytelling and empathy.
poll : learning with robots –
digital literacy and importance for curriculum primary, secondary and post secondary level.
digital literacy is changing every year;
drones
Buckingham Shum, S., & Ferguson, R. (2012). Social Learning Analytics. Educational Technology & Society15(3), 3–26.https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=ericEJ992500&context=PC&vid=01MNPALS_SCS:SCS&search_scope=MyInst_and_CI&tab=Everything&lang=en
Mor, Y., Ferguson, R., & Wasson, B. (2015). Editorial: Learning design, teacher inquiry into student learning and learning analytics: A call for action. British Journal of Educational Technology46(2), 221–229. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12273
Rebecca Ferguson. (2014). Learning Analytics: drivers, developments and challenges. TD Tecnologie Didattiche22(3), 138–147. https://doi.org/10.17471/2499-4324/183
Hansen, C., Emin, V., Wasson, B., Mor, Y., Rodriguez-Triana, M., Dascalu, M., … Pernin, J. (2013). Towards an Integrated Model of Teacher Inquiry into Student Learning, Learning Design and Learning Analytics. Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact – Proceedings of EC-TEL 20138095, 605–606. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-40814-4_73
how to decolonize educational technology: MOOCs coming from the big colonial powers, not from small countries. Video games: many have very colonial perspective
strategies for innovative pedagogies: only certainly groups or aspects taking into account; rarely focus on support by management, scheduling, time tabling, tech support.

+++++++++++
more on future trends in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=future+trends

Does AI favor tyranny

Why Technology Favors Tyranny

Artificial intelligence could erase many practical advantages of democracy, and erode the ideals of liberty and equality. It will further concentrate power among a small elite if we don’t take steps to stop it.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/10/yuval-noah-harari-technology-tyranny/568330/

YUVAL NOAH HARARI  OCTOBER 2018 ISSUE

Ordinary people may not understand artificial intelligence and biotechnology in any detail, but they can sense that the future is passing them by. In 1938 the common man’s condition in the Soviet Union, Germany, or the United States may have been grim, but he was constantly told that he was the most important thing in the world, and that he was the future (provided, of course, that he was an “ordinary man,” rather than, say, a Jew or a woman).

n 2018 the common person feels increasingly irrelevant. Lots of mysterious terms are bandied about excitedly in ted Talks, at government think tanks, and at high-tech conferences—globalizationblockchaingenetic engineeringAImachine learning—and common people, both men and women, may well suspect that none of these terms is about them.

Fears of machines pushing people out of the job market are, of course, nothing new, and in the past such fears proved to be unfounded. But artificial intelligence is different from the old machines. In the past, machines competed with humans mainly in manual skills. Now they are beginning to compete with us in cognitive skills.

Israel is a leader in the field of surveillance technology, and has created in the occupied West Bank a working prototype for a total-surveillance regime. Already today whenever Palestinians make a phone call, post something on Facebook, or travel from one city to another, they are likely to be monitored by Israeli microphones, cameras, drones, or spy software. Algorithms analyze the gathered data, helping the Israeli security forces pinpoint and neutralize what they consider to be potential threats.

The conflict between democracy and dictatorship is actually a conflict between two different data-processing systems. AI may swing the advantage toward the latter.

As we rely more on Google for answers, our ability to locate information independently diminishes. Already today, “truth” is defined by the top results of a Google search. This process has likewise affected our physical abilities, such as navigating space.

So what should we do?

For starters, we need to place a much higher priority on understanding how the human mind works—particularly how our own wisdom and compassion can be cultivated.

+++++++++++++++
more on SCSU student philosophy club in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=philosophy+student+club

SCSU meeting on microcredentialing

Monday, June 11, 3PM

  • Everything on badges and microcredentialing n this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=microcredentialing

  • Colorado Digital Badging Initiative

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/20/colorados-digital-badging-initiative/

  • regarding badges

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/04/11/digital-badges-in-education/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/09/14/badges-blueprint/

++++++++++++++++
From Gail Ruhland:

Guess what … I searched for Brenda Perea (in hopes of maybe getting some information on how they set up their system) … One of her current positions is with Credly … Do we still want to reach out to her?

https://www.linkedin.com/in/brendaperea/

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-credential-field-guide-released-brenda-perea/

Johnathan Finkelstein: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=finkelstein

+++++++++++++++
Penn State Digital Badges: https://badgesapp.psu.edu/

Home page

 

Penn State team tackles surge of digital badge usage in Nittany AI Challenge

http://news.psu.edu/story/511791/2018/03/21/academics/penn-state-team-tackles-surge-digital-badge-usage-nittany-ai

library badges

What Are Digital Badges

badge system overview

http://www.personal.psu.edu/bxb11/blogs/brett_bixler_e-portfolio/2012/07/badges-at-penn-state.html

http://www.personal.psu.edu/bxb11/blogs/brett_bixler_e-portfolio/assets_c/2012/07/BadgusToBackpack-thumb-400×300-326489.jpg

++++++++++++++++++

Stony Brook

https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/spd/badges/index.php

Chancellor Zimpher Announces SUNY Effort to Expand Micro Credentials for Students

October 29, 2015

https://www.suny.edu/suny-news/press-releases/october-2015/10-29-15-micro-credentials/chancellor-zimpher-announces-suny-effort-to-expand-micro-credentials-for-students.html

Kaltura promo: https://learn.esc.edu/media/Ken+Lindblom%2C+Dean+of+the+School+of+Professional+Development%2C+Stony+Brook+University/1_wxhe9l4h

SUNY Micro-Credentialing Task Force Report and Recommendations: http://www.system.suny.edu/media/suny/content-assets/documents/faculty-senate/plenary/Microcredentialing-Report-Final-DRAFT—9-18-17.pdf

page 4, page 12-21

+++++++++++++++++++

Pearson Digital Library for Education

https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/products-services-teaching/course-content/digital-library/education.html

+++++++++++++++++

Millennial demand drives higher ed badging expansion

You don’t need a whole degree to learn to fly or fix a drone
Matt Zalaznick August 19, 2016

https://www.universitybusiness.com/article/millennial-demand-drives-higher-ed-badging-expansion

Fields in which most badges have been issued:  

  • Business
  • Technology
  • Education
  • Health care

94%: Institutions offering alternative credentials

1 in 5: Colleges and universities that issue badges

Nearly 2/3: Institutions that cited alternative credentials as an important strategy for the future.

-Source: “Demographic Shifts in Educational Demand and the Rise of Alternative Credentials,” University Professional and Continuing Education Association and Pearson, 2016

AI and China education

China’s children are its secret weapon in the global AI arms race

China wants to be the world leader in artificial intelligence by 2030. To get there, it’s reinventing the way children are taught

despite China’s many technological advances, in this new cyberspace race, the West had the lead.

Xi knew he had to act. Within twelve months he revealed his plan to make China a science and technology superpower. By 2030 the country would lead the world in AI, with a sector worth $150 billion. How? By teaching a generation of young Chinese to be the best computer scientists in the world.

Today, the US tech sector has its pick of the finest minds from across the world, importing top talent from other countries – including from China. Over half of Bay Area workers are highly-skilled immigrants. But with the growth of economies worldwide and a Presidential administration hell-bent on restricting visas, it’s unclear that approach can last.

In the UK the situation is even worse. Here, the government predicts there’ll be a shortfall of three million employees for high-skilled jobs by 2022 – even before you factor in the immigration crunch of Brexit. By contrast, China is plotting a homegrown strategy of local and national talent development programs. It may prove a masterstroke.

In 2013 the city’s teenagers gained global renown when they topped the charts in the PISA tests administered every three years by the OECD to see which country’s kids are the smartest in the world. Aged 15, Shanghai students were on average three full years ahead of their counterparts in the UK or US in maths and one-and-a-half years ahead in science.

Teachers, too, were expected to be learners. Unlike in the UK, where, when I began to teach a decade ago, you might be working on full-stops with eleven-year-olds then taking eighteen-year-olds through the finer points of poetry, teachers in Shanghai specialised not only in a subject area, but also an age-group.

Shanghai’s success owed a lot to Confucian tradition, but it fitted precisely the best contemporary understanding of how expertise is developed. In his book Why Don’t Kids Like School? cognitive Dan Willingham explains that complex mental skills like creativity and critical thinking depend on our first having mastered the simple stuff. Memorisation and repetition of the basics serve to lay down the neural architecture that creates automaticity of thought, ultimately freeing up space in our working memory to think big.

Seung-bin Lee, a seventeen-year-old high school graduate, told me of studying fourteen hours a day, seven days a week, for the three years leading up to the Suneung, the fearsome SAT exam taken by all Korean school leavers on a single Thursday each November, for which all flights are grounded so as not to break students’ concentration during the 45 minutes of the English listening paper.
Korea’s childhoods were being lost to a relentless regime of studying, crushed in a top-down system that saw them as cyphers rather than kids.

A decade ago, we consoled ourselves that although kids in China and Korea worked harder and did better on tests than ours, it didn’t matter. They were compliant, unthinking drones, lacking the creativity, critical thinking or entrepreneurialism needed to succeed in the world. No longer. Though there are still issues with Chinese education – urban centres like Shanghai and Hong Kong are positive outliers – the country knows something that we once did: education is the one investment on which a return is guaranteed. China is on course to becoming the first education superpower.

Troublingly, where education in the UK and US has been defined by creativity and independent thinking – Shanghai teachers told me of visits to our schools to learn about these qualities – our direction of travel is now away from those strengths and towards exams and standardisation, with school-readiness tests in the pipeline and UK schools minister Nick Gibb suggesting kids can beat exam stress by sitting more of them. Centres of excellence remain, but increasingly, it feels, we’re putting our children at risk of losing out to the robots, while China is building on its strong foundations to ask how its young people can be high-tech pioneers. They’re thinking big – we’re thinking of test scores.

soon “digital information processing” would be included as a core subject on China’s national graduation exam – the Gaokao – and pictured classrooms in which students would learn in cross-disciplinary fashion, designing mobile phones for example, in order to develop design, engineering and computing skills. Focusing on teaching kids to code was short-sighted, he explained. “We still regard it as a language between human and computer.” (My note: they are practically implementing the Finland’s attempt to rebuild curricula)

“If your plan is for one year,” went an old Chinese saying, “plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees. If your plan is for 100 years, educate children.” Two and half thousand years later chancellor Gwan Zhong might update his proverb, swapping rice for bitcoin and trees for artificial intelligence, but I’m sure he’d stand by his final point.

+++++++++++++
more on AR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=artificial+intelligence

more on China education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/01/06/chinas-transformation-of-higher-education/

1 2 3 4