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Literature on Digital Humanities

Burdick, A. (2012). Digital humanities . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=alma990078472690104318&context=L&vid=01MNPALS_SCS:SCS&search_scope=MyInst_and_CI&tab=Everything&lang=en

digital humanities is born f the encounter between traditional humanities and computational methods.

p. 5. From Humanism to Humanities
While the foundations of of humanistic inquiry and the liberal arts can be traced back in the west to the medieval trivium and quadrivium, the modern and human sciences are rooted in the Renaissance shift from a medieval, church dominated, theocratic world view to be human centered one period the gradual transformation of early humanism into the disciplines that make up the humanities today Was profoundly shaped by the editorial practices involved in the recovery of the corpus of works from classical antiquity

P. 6. The shift from humanism to the institution only sanctioned disciplinary practices and protocols that we associate with the humanities today is best described as a gradual process of subdivision and specialization.
P. 7. Text-based disciplines in studies (classics, literature, philosophy, the history of ideas) make up, from the very start, the core of both the humanities and the great books curricular instituted in the 1920s and 1930s.
P. 10. Transmedia modes of argumentation
In the 21st-century, we communicate in media significantly more varied, extensible, and multiplicative then linear text. From scalable databases to information visualizations, from video lectures to multi-user virtual platforms serious content and rigorous argumentation take shape across multiple platforms in media. The best digital humanities pedagogy and research projects train students both in “reading “and “writing “this emergent rhetoric and in understanding how the reshape and three model humanistic knowledge. This means developing critically informed literacy expensive enough to include graphic design visual narrative time based media, and the development of interfaces (Rather then the rote acceptance of them as off-the-shelf products).
P. 11. The visual becomes ever more fundamental to the digital humanities, in ways that compliment, enhance, and sometimes are in pension with the textual.
There is no either/or, no simple interchangeability between language and the visual, no strict sub ordination of the one to the other. Words are themselves visual but other kinds of visual constructs do different things. The question is how to use each to its best effect into device meaningful interpret wing links, to use Theodor Nelson’s ludic neologism.
P. 11. The suite of expressive forms now encompasses the use of sound, motion graphics, animation, screen capture, video, audio, and the appropriation and into remix sink of code it underlines game engines. This expanded range of communicative tools requires those who are engaged in digital humanities world to familiarize themselves with issues, discussions, and debates in design fields, especially communication and interaction design. Like their print predecessors, form at the convention center screen environments can become naturalized all too quickly, with the results that the thinking that informed they were designed goes unperceived.

p. 13.

For digital humanists, design is a creative practice harnessing cultural, social, economic, and technological constraints in order to bring systems and objects into the world. Design in dialogue with research is simply a picnic, but when used to pose in frame questions about knowledge, design becomes an intellectual method. Digital humanities is a production based in Denver in which theoretical issues get tested in the design of implementations and implementations or loci after your radical reflection and elaboration.
Did you thaw humanists have much to learn from communication and media design about how to juxtapose and integrate words and images create hire he is of reading, Forge pathways of understanding, deployed grades in templates to best effect, and develop navigational schemata that guide in produce meaningful interactions.
P. 15.  The field of digital digital humanities me see the emergence of polymaths who can “ do it all” : Who can research, write, shoot, edit, code, model, design, network, and dialogue with users. But there is also ample room for specialization and, particularly, for collaboration.
P. 16. Computational activities in digital humanities.
The foundational layer, computation, relies on principles that are, on the surface, at odds with humanistic methods.
P. 17. The second level involves processing in a way that conform to computational capacities, and this were explored in the first generation of digital scholarship and stylometrics, concordance development, and indexing.
P. 17.
Duration, analysis, editing, modeling.
Duration, analysis, editing, and modeling comprise fundamental activities at the core of digital humanities. Involving archives, collections, repositories, and other aggregations of materials, duration is the selection and organization of materials in an interpretive framework, argument, or exhibit.
P. 18. Analysis refers to the processing of text or data: statistical and quantitative methods of analysis have brought close readings of texts (stylometrics and genre analysis, correlation, comparisons of versions for alter attribution or usage patterns ) into dialogue with distant reading (The crunching cuff large quantities of information across the corpus of textual data or its metadata).
Edit think has been revived with the advent of digital media and the web and to continue to be an integral activity in textual as well as time based formats.
P. 18. Model link highlights the notion of content models- shapes of argument expressed in information structures in their design he digital project is always an expression of assumptions about knowledge: usually domain specific knowledge given an explicit form by the model in which it is designed.
P. 19.  Each of these areas of activity- cure ration, analysis, editing, and modeling is supported by the basic building blocks of digital activity. But they also depend upon networks and infrastructure that are cultural and institutional as well as technical. Servers, software, and systems administration are key elements of any project design.
P. 30. Digital media are not more “evolved” have them print media nor are books obsolete; but the multiplicity of media in the very processes of mediation entry mediation in the formation of cultural knowledge and humanistic inquiry required close attention. Tug link between distant and clothes, macro and micro, and surface in depth becomes the norm. Here, we focus on the importance of visualization to the digital humanities before moving on to other, though often related, genre and methods such as Locative investigation, thick mapping, animated archives, database documentaries, platform studies, and emerging practices like cultural analytics, data mining and humanities gaming.
P. 35. Fluid texture out what he refers to the mutability of texts in the variants and versions Whether these are produced through Authorial changes, anything, transcription, translation, or print production

Cultural Analytics, aggregation, and data mining.
The field of cultural Analytics has emerged over the past few years, utilizing tools of high-end computational analysis and data visualization today sect large-scale coach data sets. Cultural Analytic does Not analyze cultural artifacts, but operates on the level of digital models of this materials in aggregate. Again, the point is not to pit “close” hermeneutic reading against “distant” data mapping, but rather to appreciate the synergistic possibilities and tensions that exist between a hyper localized, deep analysis and a microcosmic view

p. 42.

Data mining is a term that covers a host of picnics for analyzing digital material by “parameterizing” some feature of information and extract in it. This means that any element of a file or collection of files that can be given explicit specifications,  or parameters, can be extracted from those files for analysis.
Understanding the rehtoric of graphics is another essential skill, therefore, in working at a skill where individual objects are lost in the mass of processed information and data. To date, much humanities data mining has merely involved counting. Much more sophisticated statistical methods and use of probability will be needed for humanists to absorb the lessons of the social sciences into their methods
P. 42. Visualization and data design
Currently, visualization in the humanities uses techniques drawn largely from the social sciences, Business applications, and the natural sciences, all of which require self-conscious criticality in their adoption. Such visual displays including graphs and charts, may present themselves is subjective or even unmediated views of reality, rather then is rhetorical constructs.

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Warwick, C., Terras, M., & Nyhan, J. (2012). Digital humanities in practice . London: Facet Publishing in association with UCL Centre for Digital Humanities.

https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=alma990078423690104318&context=L&vid=01MNPALS_SCS:SCS&search_scope=MyInst_and_CI&tab=Everything&lang=en

 

21st Century Teaching

6 Key Trends to 21st Century Teaching

Richard Nattoo

https://www.edsurge.com/research/guides/21st-century-teaching-guide

OER on the rise

Colleges around the country have also started hiring staff members with titles like OER Coordinator and Affordable Content Librarian. Our series looked into how the movement is changing, and the research into the costsand benefits. You can even hear a podcast version here.

Flipped classrooms seem to be growing exponentially

Robert Talbert, a professor of mathematics at Grand Valley State University and author of the book Flipped Learning. Talbert recently tabulated how many scholarly articles are published each year about “flipping” instruction, meaning that traditional lecture-style material is delivered before class (often using videos) so that classroom time can be used for discussion and other more active learning.

OER on the rise

More professors are looking to experts to help them teach. (Though some resist.)

By 2016, there were an estimated 13,000 instructional designers on U.S. campuses, according to a report by Intentional Futures. And that number seems to be growing.

There’s also a growing acceptance of the scholarly discipline known as “learning sciences,” a body of research across disciplines of cognitive science, computer science, psychology, anthropology and other fields trying to unlock secrets of how people learn and how to best teach.

here’s a classic study that shows that professors think they’re better teachers than they actually are

The classroom isn’t the only place to learn

experiments with putting office hours online to get students to show up, bringing virtual reality to science labs to broaden what students could explore there, and changing how homework and tests are written.

Students are also finding their own new ways to learn online, by engaging in online activism. The era of a campus bubble seems over in the age of Twitter

Colleges are still struggling to find the best fit for online education

We dove into what lessons can be learned from MOOCs, as well what research so far about which audiences online can best serve.

And what does it mean to teach an age of information overload and polarization?

Perhaps the toughest questions of all about teaching in the 21st century is what exactly is the professor’s role in the Internet age. Once upon a time the goal was to be the ‘sage on the stage,’ when lecturing was king. Today many people argue that the college instructor should be more of a ‘guide on the side.’ But as one popular teaching expert notes, even that may not quite fit.

And in an era of intense political polarization, colleges and professors are looking for best to train students to become digitally literate so they can play their roles as informed citizens. But just how to do that is up for debate, though some are looking for a nonpartisan solution.

 

Your Brain Off Facebook

This Is Your Brain Off Facebook

Planning on quitting the social platform? A major new study offers a glimpse of what unplugging might do for your life. (Spoiler: It’s not so bad.)

Benedict Carey, Jan 30, 2019

This Is Your Brain Off Facebook by BENEDICT CAREY

So what happens if you actually do quit? A new study, the most comprehensive to date, offers a preview.

Well before news broke that Facebook had shared users’ data without consent, scientists and habitual users debated how the platform had changed the experience of daily life.

the use of Facebook and other social media is linked to mental distress, especially in adolescents.

Others have likened habitual Facebook use to a mental disorder, comparing it to drug addiction and even publishing magnetic-resonance images of what Facebook addiction “looks like in the brain.”

When Facebook has published its own analyses to test such claims, the company has been roundly criticized.

For abstainers, breaking up with Facebook freed up about an hour a day, on average, and more than twice that for the heaviest users.

research led by Ethan Kross, a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, has found that high levels of passive browsing on social media predict lowered moods, compared to more active engagement.

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more on Facebook in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook

ELI webinar AI and teaching

ELI Webinar | How AI and Machine Learning Shape the Future of Teaching

https://events.educause.edu/eli/webinars/2019/how-ai-and-machine-learning-shape-the-future-of-teaching

When:
1/23/2019 Wed
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Where:
Centennial Hall – 100
Lecture Room
Who:
Anyone interested in
new methods for teaching

Outcomes

  • Explore what is meant by AI and how it relates to machine learning and data science
  • Identify relevant uses of AI and machine learning to advance education
  • Explore opportunities for using AI and machine learning to transform teaching
  • Understand how technology can shape open educational materials

Kyle Bowen, Director, Teaching and Learning with Technology https://members.educause.edu/kyle-bowen

Jennifer Sparrow, Senior Director of Teaching and Learning With Tech, https://members.educause.edu/jennifer-sparrow

Malcolm Brown, Director, Educause, Learning Initiative

more in this IMB blog on Jennifer Sparrow and digital fluency: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/11/01/preparing-learners-for-21st-century-digital-citizenship/

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Feb 5, 2018 webinar notes

creating a jazz band of one: ThoughSourus

Eureka: machine learning tool, brainstorming engine. give it an initial idea and it returns similar ideas. Like Google: refine the idea, so the machine can understand it better. create a collection of ideas to translate into course design or others.

Netlix:

influencers and microinfluencers, pre- and doing the execution

place to start explore and generate content.

https://answerthepublic.com/

a machine can construct a book with the help of a person. bionic book. machine and person working hand in hand. provide keywords and phrases from lecture notes, presentation materials. from there recommendations and suggestions based on own experience; then identify included and excluded content. then instructor can construct.

Design may be the least interesting part of the book for the faculty.

multiple choice quiz may be the least interesting part, and faculty might want to do much deeper assessment.

use these machine learning techniques to build assessment. how to more effectively. inquizitive is the machine learning

 

students engagements and similar prompts

presence in the classroom: pre-service teachers class. how to immerse them and practice classroom management skills

https://books.wwnorton.com/books/inquizitive/overview/

First class: marriage btw VR and use of AI – an environment headset: an algorithm reacts how teachers are interacting with the virtual kids. series of variables, oppty to interact with present behavior. classroom management skills. simulations and environments otherwise impossible to create. apps for these type of interactions

facilitation, reflection and research

AI for more human experience, allow more time for the faculty to be more human, more free time to contemplate.

Jason: Won’t the use of AI still reduce the amount of faculty needed?

Christina Dumeng: @Jason–I think it will most likely increase the amount of students per instructor.

Andrew Cole (UW-Whitewater): I wonder if instead of reducing faculty, these types of platforms (e.g., analytic capabilities) might require instructors to also become experts in the various technology platforms.

Dirk Morrison: Also wonder what the implications of AI for informal, self-directed learning?

Kate Borowske: The context that you’re presenting this in, as “your own jazz band,” is brilliant. These tools presented as a “partner” in the “band” seems as though it might be less threatening to faculty. Sort of gamifies parts of course design…?

Dirk Morrison: Move from teacher-centric to student-centric? Recommender systems, AI-based tutoring?

Andrew Cole (UW-Whitewater): The course with the bot TA must have been 100-level right? It would be interesting to see if those results replicate in 300, 400 level courses

Recording available here

https://events.educause.edu/eli/webinars/2019/how-ai-and-machine-learning-shape-the-future-of-teaching

Future of Libraries with Instructional Design

Library 2.019 virtual mini-conference, “Shaping the Future of Libraries with Instructional Design

Wednesday, March 13th, from 12:00 – 3:00 pm US Pacific Daylight Time (click https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=Library+2.019+ID&iso=20190313T12&p1=283&ah=3 to see in your local time zone).

Here are the links to the recordings of the sessions:
https://www.library20.com/page/recordings-id (you must be logged in)

This is a free event, thanks to our founding conference sponsor: School of Information at San José State University.

ATTENDING: We will send links for attending the conference a day or two before the event.

If you have friends or colleagues that wish to attend, this is a free event and we encourage you to share our information widely. However, please send them to the conference registration page (https://www.library20.com/instructionaldesign) rather than giving them the above link directly as it will allow us to track participation.

https://www.library20.com/instructionaldesign

https://www.library20.com/forum/categories/library-2-019-instructional-design-accepted-submissions/listForCategory

#library2019 #libraryid

Dana Bryant

Sandy Hirsch, SJSU School of Information.

Steven Bell, John Shank – integrating ID into practice. blended librarianship.

critical mass of librarians doing ID and libraries hiring IDs.

Michael Flierl
Assistant Professor of Library Science, Purdue University

Dana Bryant
Lead Instructional Technologist for Academic Technology Services, Woodruff Library, at Emory University

Lindsay O’Neill
Faculty, California State University, Fullerton’s Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology Program

Steven J. Bell (moderator)

Associate University Librarian for Research and Instructional Services at Temple University

https://www.library20.com/page/library-2-0-schedule-gmt-4

What is ID: ID create an environment conductive to students’ success. Thoughtful and applied design. Making faculty and instructors’ life easier. Allow faculty to do what they do best.

Lindsey: solving the instructional problem with the tools at hand.

go-to ed tech? What is the hot tech right now?

Lindsey: H5P (open source) CC – licensed, Moodle, WordPress, build online tutorials for free (Isolde), Norway, well based, VR tours. Will H5P become paid? Michael: cell phones Dana: Emory VoiceThread. From the chat: Articulate365 (pricy), Kahoot, Peardeck, Yellowdig, vidgrid, Adobe Spark, Adobe POst, padlet, Groupme instead of Canvas, Vyond, Coggle, wakelet, Phinx

Suggestions for librarians who want to build ID skills. Dana: connect with the regional community if no ID on campus. Community of practice. Using ID tools, speakers outside of campus. Lindsey: teaching myself what is most interesting to me. what technologies are important. Find a learning community. Michael: repeat the others

keep up to date on ID theory and practices: Dana – ELI, OLC (Online Learning Consortium). ELearning Heroes. Lindsay: corporate word. Michael: POD

the one-shot instruction: what is the approach (q/n from the chat); Dana – ID as a services. person dedicated following up with people requested either ID class or training, open the line of communication. summative evaluation type of activity since we are failing to evaluate how well students absorbed the information. LIndsey: one-shot for basics (e.g. freshman), build scaffold program, reserved the one shot for meeting with librarians, for hands-on. Michael: work with faculty member and rewrite a program, build assessment rather then only deliver

areas of impact: subject matter librarians, working with faculty to use of the library resources, new faculty drawn in info and if not follow up, Canvas support.  Michael: librarians and ID working directly with faculty rewriting their curricula, measure it, demonstrating library need, 3000 students – correlation. document the lib contribution to student learning directly, the teaching-learning culture change. using info and data in more authentic ways. Lindsey: disconnect the way librarian teach vs faculty teach. Coordination scaffolding.

q/n from the chat. easily. how can non ID librarian can easily implement ID type:
Lindsey: new to ID? Google. Jargon and Acronyms. re framing how you see ed technology. technology as something to get the job done. no need to get fancy.
Dana: same as Lindsey. But also learning theories and learning outcomes. From ID perspective: what they will come out with by the end of the session. action words.
Michael: mindset. what students want to learn, before what I will teach. backward design – understanding by design. UDL. Grab a friend and talk through.
Tara

ed tech is not getting job done:
clickers for attendance is horrible idea.

 

from the chat:

Dee Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning1

https://www.byui.edu/outcomes-and-assessment-old/the-basics/step-1-articulate-outcomes/dee-finks-taxonomy-of-significant-learning

https://www.alt.ac.uk/

Association of Talent Development

Christy Tucker’s blog – Experiencing E-Learning

https://www.issotl.com/2019

https://e-learning.zeef.com/tracy.parish

https://www.lib.umich.edu/blogs/tiny-studies/using-pilot-study-test-and-assess-new-instruction-model

http://suny.edu/emtech

I had a really interesting role in grad school where we lived in the land between tech support and pedagogical / design support.

From Rajesh Kumar Das to All panelists and other attendees: (02:38 PM)
Good to hear from mike about affective learning. In this case, could you please focus what kind of technique is approprite for what, i.e. Didactic instruction, a low-complexity teaching technique such as a “Quiz Bowl”, or Jigsaw Method as high-complexity strategy, or both.

From Hailey W. to All panelists and other attendees: (02:36 PM)
As an ID librarian and the campus LMS administrator I struggle with getting them to see that other side of my role. That I’m not just “tech support”. Anyone else? Een jsut not being tech support?

From Vickie Kline to All panelists and other attendees: (02:44 PM)
As a librarian not formally trained in ID, I think a good entry point for exploring is Universal Design for Learning. We also need to pay attention to creating accessibility materials…

From Heather Quintero to All panelists and other attendees: (02:45 PM)
I always start with ADDIE… I am formally trained in ID and am an IT trainer for librarians. ADDIE is a framework for every class I make for both live and online classes. Don’t disregard ADDIE.

From Allison Rand to All panelists and other attendees: (02:47 PM)
The Wiggins and McTighe is a great book!

ADDIE Model

From Shane to All panelists and other attendees: (02:48 PM)
++SLIS open-source course on Instructional Design for Library Instruction

From Wendy to All panelists and other attendees: (02:49 PM)
Char Booth’s USER is also a very good model

http://www.modernlearning.com

https://web.mit.edu/jbelcher/www/TEALref/Crouch_Mazur.pdf

From Roberta (Robin) Sullivan to All panelists and other attendees: (02:53 PM)
@Rachel, Peggy, Shane – an open source course is available. Check out the SUNY’s Quality by Design (QbD): Strategies for Effective Teaching and Quality Course Design at: http://suny.edu/qbd This course is available as a facilitated version at least once each semester and as a self-paced non-facilitated version in Blackboard’s CourseSites. After completing the course requirements you can earn a Digital Badge to show your accomplishment.

From Naomi Toftness to All panelists and other attendees: (02:55 PM)
Just heard the terms “deliberate innovation” vs. “desperate innovation” that totally speaks to my situation with wanting to adopt the new cool tech

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BB screenshotSESSION LINK – https://sas.elluminate.com/d.jnlp?sid=2008350&password=LIB2019IDPart7 — If the session link doesn’t work for you, please copy and paste into your browser.

Session Title: Gamifying Instruction: Breakouts and Badges!

Your Name and Title: Dr. Brenda Boyer, Librarian & Instructor

Your Library, School, or Organization Name: Kutztown Sr. High School, Rutgers University

Your Twitter Handle (@name): @bsboyer

Name(s) of Co-Presenter(s): Brenda Boyer

Area of the World from Which You Will Present: Kutztown, PA

Language in Which You Will Present: English

Target Audience: Instructional Design Librarians

Short Session Description: Build engagement for your online library instruction using LMS features, Breakout boxes, and digital badges.

Session Strand (use the “tag”): {Session Strand (use the “tag”):}

Full Session Description: It’s time to amp up your library instruction! Gamifying instruction in research skills such as database usage, advanced searching, & more can increase engagement and drive independent learning for students of all ages. This session will describe how learning management system (LMS) features can be combined with digital microcredentials (i.e. badges) and breakout boxes to gamify instruction that can be otherwise deemed boring (for both the learners and the librarian!).

Link to Conference Site Session Proposal (full URL with http://): https://www.library20.com/forum/topics/gamifying-instruction-breakouts-and-badges

Other Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session:

Your Bio: Dr. Brenda Boyer is a librarian and instructional designer. She has developed online instruction for secondary learners in the Kutztown (PA) School District, as well as for graduate and professional development learners at Wilson College and Rutgers University. She designed and instructs the Rutgers graduate course, Learning Theory, Inquiry, & Instructional Design, and is a frequent presenter at AASL, Internet@Schools. She has published articles in School Library Journal, Teacher Librarian, and School Library Connection.

Email: boyer.brenda@gmail.com

notes from Brenda’s session:

are we getting the job done, is our instruction sticking, what evidence we do have?

differentiate: who is ready to do what” at what skill level? how to bring everybody up to speed?

3 elements of Digital Gamification: leverage LMS (set game levels); how digital badges are paired 3. using digital breakout boxes to push challenge, skills

each chat as prerequisite for the next. prerequisite in LMS. Each game level is module. completed with a quizz. if they pass the quiz, opens challenge.1. what is page (facts about a tool to learn about[ what the tool does, feature, etc.) 2. suppe rshort video tour (3 min max), talk about something unique 3. quick quiz (max 5 q/s from the intro page and video). pass the quiz (100 %) to unlock the challenge level. 4. challenge level. digital breakout box embedded in the LMS. breakout using Google Forms. various locks (words, letter, numbers)

Badges why?

Badgr, Credly, iDoceo

Breakout Boxes

 

 

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SESSION LINK – https://sas.elluminate.com/d.jnlp?sid=2008350&password=LIB2019IDPart8 — If the session link doesn’t work for you, please copy and paste into your browser.

Session Title: Improving Library Tutorials: The Multimedia Design Principles

Your Name and Title: Darlene Aguilar, Instructional Design Librarian

Your Library, School, or Organization Name: Loyola Marymount University

Your Twitter Handle (@name): @DarleneA_ID

Name(s) of Co-Presenter(s):

Area of the World from Which You Will Present: Los Angeles, CA

Language in Which You Will Present: English

Target Audience: Reference and Instruction Librarians, Instructional Designers, Tutorial developers, Academic Librarians

Short Session Description: This session will review Mayer’s (2001) Multimedia Design Principles to help improve instructional modules, tutorials, and videos.

Session Strand (use the “tag”): {Session Strand (use the “tag”):}

Full Session Description: Librarians are creating more online modules, videos, and tutorials to teach information literacy skills. Whether designing instruction online or in-person, research-based instructional methods are required and learning Mayer’s Multimedia Design Principles is the best place to start. In this session, I will review essential prior-knowledge on image types and working memory. I will then show learners how to minimize cognitive overload using these 12 principles: multimedia, spatial contiguity, temporal contiguity, coherence, modality, redundancy, individual differences, signaling, pacing, concepts first, personalization, and human voice.

Link to Conference Site Session Proposal (full URL with http://): https://www.library20.com/forum/topics/improving-library-tutorials-the-multimedia-design-principles

Other Websites / URLs Associated with Your Session: https://linkedin.com/in/darlene-aguilar/

Your Bio: Darlene Aguilar is an Instructional Design Librarian at Loyola Marymount University where she designs and develops video tutorials and online modules on information literacy and library related topics. Additionally, she provides “best practices” training in instructional design to other LMU librarians. She graduated from the University of Southern California with a Master’s in Education for Learning Design and Technology and previously worked at LAUSD for 7 years. She strives to remove learning barriers that are embedded in instruction and curriculum and make learning accessible to all learners.

Email: darlene.aguilar@lmu.edu

notes from Darlene Aguilar session: spacial contiguity, temporal contiguity. Modality: animation + narration better then animation + text, redundancy: animation and narration then animation + narration + text

boolean operators

 

 

instructional design books

video editing

Public Service Announcements using visuals

Troy Shafer’s Health class.

Steps to promote your own brand versus using generic visuals:

  • Plan your project by considering the following items
    • create a very basic script and timeline
    • take footage (pictures and movie)

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/21/handout-videos-on-mobile-devices/

Here is more information on apps and video tips for video editing using mobile devices:

video editing for mobile devices


http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/19/how-to-use-the-free-youtube-video-editor/

more information on video recording and editing tools
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/21/tools-video-creation/ (for Android devices)

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more info for Health classes:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/18/digital-literacy-instruction-for-scsu-health-class/

MnState OER webinar

Open Textbook Webinar — a 90-minute online meeting to learn about open textbooks.

Peer review of open textbooks is a critical component of assessing quality and supporting faculty looking for resources to use in their own classes.  After the workshop, you’ll be eligible to earn a $200 stipend if you provide a short review of an open textbook from the OpenTextbook Library.  Reviews are due 6-8 weeks following the workshop.

To prepare for the webinar, please take a few minutes and visit the Open Textbook Library (http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/). Glance through the Open Textbook Library and look for textbooks in your discipline that may be appropriate for you to review.  In order to receive the $200 stipend, you must 1) participate in the webinar and 2) complete a textbook review.  (Please note: There may not be texts available for review in your areas of expertise.)

When:   Wednesday, November 14, 2018; 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Note that additional Open Textbook Webinars are scheduled throughout the academic year.  Please contact Karen Pikula, OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at Karen.Pikula@minnstate.edu if you cannot attend the meeting on Monday. 

How:     Join the webinar through Adobe Connect

My notes:

open.umn.edu

3 models of creating textbooks: 1. write a book on their own 2. commercial model 3. Funder

Creative Common and copyright.

creative commons licenses

CC licenses free to: copy, share, edit, mix, keep, use

reviewing a textbook in the OER. Edit a book in OER

deep learning revolution

Sejnowski, T. J. (2018). The Deep Learning Revolution. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

How deep learning―from Google Translate to driverless cars to personal cognitive assistants―is changing our lives and transforming every sector of the economy.

The deep learning revolution has brought us driverless cars, the greatly improved Google Translate, fluent conversations with Siri and Alexa, and enormous profits from automated trading on the New York Stock Exchange. Deep learning networks can play poker better than professional poker players and defeat a world champion at Go. In this book, Terry Sejnowski explains how deep learning went from being an arcane academic field to a disruptive technology in the information economy.

Sejnowski played an important role in the founding of deep learning, as one of a small group of researchers in the 1980s who challenged the prevailing logic-and-symbol based version of AI. The new version of AI Sejnowski and others developed, which became deep learning, is fueled instead by data. Deep networks learn from data in the same way that babies experience the world, starting with fresh eyes and gradually acquiring the skills needed to navigate novel environments. Learning algorithms extract information from raw data; information can be used to create knowledge; knowledge underlies understanding; understanding leads to wisdom. Someday a driverless car will know the road better than you do and drive with more skill; a deep learning network will diagnose your illness; a personal cognitive assistant will augment your puny human brain. It took nature many millions of years to evolve human intelligence; AI is on a trajectory measured in decades. Sejnowski prepares us for a deep learning future.

A pioneering scientist explains ‘deep learning’

Artificial intelligence meets human intelligence

neural networks

Buzzwords like “deep learning” and “neural networks” are everywhere, but so much of the popular understanding is misguided, says Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Sejnowski, a pioneer in the study of learning algorithms, is the author of The Deep Learning Revolution (out next week from MIT Press). He argues that the hype about killer AI or robots making us obsolete ignores exciting possibilities happening in the fields of computer science and neuroscience, and what can happen when artificial intelligence meets human intelligence.

Machine learning is a very large field and goes way back. Originally, people were calling it “pattern recognition,” but the algorithms became much broader and much more sophisticated mathematically. Within machine learning are neural networks inspired by the brain, and then deep learning. Deep learning algorithms have a particular architecture with many layers that flow through the network. So basically, deep learning is one part of machine learning and machine learning is one part of AI.

December 2012 at the NIPS meeting, which is the biggest AI conference. There, [computer scientist] Geoff Hinton and two of his graduate students showed you could take a very large dataset called ImageNet, with 10,000 categories and 10 million images, and reduce the classification error by 20 percent using deep learning.Traditionally on that dataset, error decreases by less than 1 percent in one year. In one year, 20 years of research was bypassed. That really opened the floodgates.

The inspiration for deep learning really comes from neuroscience.

AlphaGo, the program that beat the Go champion included not just a model of the cortex, but also a model of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia, which is important for making a sequence of decisions to meet a goal. There’s an algorithm there called temporal differences, developed back in the ‘80s by Richard Sutton, that, when coupled with deep learning, is capable of very sophisticated plays that no human has ever seen before.

there’s a convergence occurring between AI and human intelligence. As we learn more and more about how the brain works, that’s going to reflect back in AI. But at the same time, they’re actually creating a whole theory of learning that can be applied to understanding the brain and allowing us to analyze the thousands of neurons and how their activities are coming out. So there’s this feedback loop between neuroscience and AI

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deep learning revolution
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=deep+learning

Why Blockchain is Hard

Why Blockchain is Hard

Jimmy Song Bitcoin Educator, Developer and Entrepreneur/PGP Fingerprint: C1D7 97BE 7D10 5291 228C D70C

https://medium.com/@jimmysong/why-blockchain-is-hard-60416ea4c5c

What is a blockchain?

The main thing distinguishing a blockchain from a normal database is that there are specific rules about how to put data into the database. That is, it cannot conflict with some other data that’s already in the database (consistent), it’s append-only (immutable), and the data itself is locked to an owner (ownable), it’s replicable and available. Finally, everyone agrees on what the state of the things in the database are (canonical) without a central party (decentralized).

It is this last point that really is the holy grail of blockchain. Decentralization is very attractive because it implies there is no single point of failure.

The Cost of Blockchains

  • Development is stricter and slower
  • Incentive structures are difficult to design
  • Maintenance is very costly
  • Users are sovereign
  • All upgrades are voluntary
  • Scaling is really hard

Centralization is a lot easier

Like it or not, the word “blockchain” has taken on a life of its own. Very few people actually understand what it is, but want to appear hip so use these words as a way to sound more intelligent. Just like “cloud” means someone else’s computer and “AI” means a tweaked algorithm, “blockchain” in this context means a slow, expensive database.“blockchain” is really just a way to get rid of the heavy apparatus of government regulation. This is overselling what blockchain can do. Blockchain doesn’t magically take away human conflict.

So what is blockchain good for?

Most industries require new features or upgrades and the freedom to change and expand as necessary. Given that blockchains are hard to upgrade, hard to change and hard to scale, most industries don’t have much use for a blockchain. a lot of companies looking to use the blockchain are not really wanting a blockchain at all, but rather IT upgrades to their particular industry. This is all well and good, but using the word “blockchain” to get there is dishonest and overselling its capability.

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more on blockchain in this IMS blgo
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

platforms for badges

Bryan and Special Guest Nate Otto,
Director of the Badgr Platform at Concentric Sky
An interactive discussion on badges and micro-credentials
Bryan Alexander, special guest Nate Otto, and the Future Trends Forum Community will discuss badges and micro-credentials at present, their future and the challenges they face.
Nate is the Director of Open Badges Projects at Concentric Sky, where he leads development of the Badgr platform for issuing and managing verifiable digital credentials.
Nate’s background in political sciences also informs his work on open standards with a focus on building and maintaining tech ecosystems resistant to monopolies.

notes from the webinar

Nate Otto Concentration Sky @ottonomy https://badgr.com/

A Beginner’s Guide To Open Badges, https://elearningindustry.com/guide-to-open-badges-beginners

Mozilla discontinue and switch to Badgr platform. free accounts to Badgr. current integration of Mozilla backpack with other platforms such as Moddle will be preserved. Backpack solution, or issue badges.

Steve Taylor: Moodle is one of the platforms integrated with Backpack.

Xapi infrastructure. super messaging protocol https://xapi.com/ . Ryan Harrell question. Nate response, great fit for badging. Badgr Pathways https://badgr.com/en-us/badgr-pathway.html

Ryan Harrell
This is an extremely useful conversation. We’re working on building a dedicated micro-credentialing platform at our University specifically to provide continuing education material based on the material we are already creating in our various programs.
Open badges extensions for education test course. Two extensions: one describes assessment which goes to a particular badge. Second extension allows the issues to describe. Published extensions. Badgr implemented the assessment extensions: the Digital Promise project – https://digitalpromise.org/.
hurdles to prevent adoption of badges: 1. still not easy enough to start issuing badges, design principles. get ambitious what to do with badges but no ability to start the assessment process. how badges will be awarded. starting small is the way, simple tools, google forms, to help decide what to do. 2. how do we understand the achievements of badges
next week: https://www.twitterandteargas.org/

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