Searching for "gaming"

games for building and exploration

Beyond Minecraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/beyond-minecraft-games-that-inspire-building-and-exploration/

1. Garry’s Mod 

garryscreenshotGarry’s Mod (GMod) is a sandbox game like Minecraft but instead of building and exploring, students use a fun physics engine that simulates things like gravity and mass. They also use a virtual toy box of assets from Valve Software’s popular games. The tool is a step up in complexity from the elegant simplicity of Minecraft, but with Garry’s Mod, students are exposed to physics concepts while having madcap fun.

2. Kerbal Space Program

kerbal_screenshotKerbal Space Program has a robust physics engine too, but it’s more focused than Garry’s Mod. Players purchase rocket parts, put them together, and then see if they can get a ship into orbit, to one of two moons, or even to another planet. These aren’t easy tasks, so play is focused on trial and error testing, and, like Minecraft, seeking help from the community is part of a successful strategy.

3. Sound Shapes 

soundshapes_screenshotSound Shapes is a visually stunning platform puzzle game set to a rich musical soundscape. Even better: students can create and share their own levels – like interactive sheet music — using sounds and objects unlocked by playing the platform game. It’s an accessible entry point into musical composition as well as game design, and provides an experience that builds on the creativity of Minecraft while offering something wholly unique for music lovers.

4. DIY

DIYFor creative kids who want to get their hands dirty, check out DIY, a site where students can find things to build, instructions for how to build them, and ways to share their creations with others. All projects are aligned to 50 skills that run the gamut from outdoors to indoors, and feature various challenges to complete and cool badges to earn and display.

5. STENCYL

screen568x568Computer programming is a great next step for students who love to mod Minecraft or toy around with the redstone resource (which simulates basic logic and circuitry). One solid entry-level tool is Stencyl, a game creation program focused on codeless, cross-platform game making. By snapping blocks of code together, students can create games that can be published and played on a variety of platforms including mobile phones.

6. CODECADEMY

Codecademy is a web-based, self-paced site that teaches actual industry-standard languages like PHP, Javascript, Python, Ruby, HTML, and CSS. While students don’t create publishable games like they would in Stencyl, their learning is purpose-driven and contextualized, e.g. JavaScript for web development or Ruby for app development. And students do get to see their code’s output directly onscreen.

Minecraft has introduced a lot of youth to games as well as the critical thinking, problem solving, and creation skills necessary for self-motivated learning. The games and sites on this list have the potential to extend that learning, providing fresh outlets for self-expression in the digital world and beyond.

More on gaming in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=minecraft

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

Games and the Brain

This Is Your Brain On Games

http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/this-is-your-brain-on-games/

“Action video games have a number of ingredients that are actually really powerful for brain plasticity, learning, attention, and vision,” says brain scientist Daphne Bavelier in her TED Talk on the subject.

In February, Italian researchers found that playing fast-paced video games can improve the reading skills of children with dyslexia.

In 2012, scientists at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that high school gamers who played video games two hours a day were better at performing virtual surgery than non-gaming medical residents.

Games in the library

Games in the library

bibliography and research

http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/index.html

Playing in the Past: A History of Games, Toys, and Puzzles in North American Libraries
Author(s): Scott Nicholson
Source: The Library Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 4 (October 2013), pp. 341-361
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/671913

demonstrate the different ways in which libraries have used games, toys, and puzzles over the last 150 years through bothcollections and services
p, 342 Defining games –
p. 348 Games as the Subject of Collections\
p. 350A significant shift in academic libraries is a focus on providing services to students. Since agrowing number of academic publications both current issues and back volumes

are ac-cessible online through library subscriptions, the physical space of academic libraries is notneeded for collections of periodicals. The concept of the “learning commons”has become
popular on US campuses in the past decade; it combines traditional library resources and
the availability of library staff members with group work spaces, computer access and assis-
tance, and writing assistance to provide one place where students can get assistance with
course work. In addition, many of these learning commons also include cafes, social spaces,
and other support of the social lives of students, and it is in this role that academic libraries
provide access to collections of games.

p. 357 Another upcoming area of gaming in libraries is gamification. Gamification is the application of game design elements to a nongame setting ðDeterding et al. 2011Þ.

————————————-

Nicholson, S. (2013, June). Exploring Gamification Techniques for Classroom Management. Paper Presented at Games+Learning+Society 9.0, Madison, WI

The concept of meaningful gamification is that the primary use of game layers is not to provide
external rewards, but rather to help participants find a deeper connection to the underyling topic

——————————-

 

More on games in education in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

brain and virtual reality

How does the brain react to virtual reality? Completely different pattern of activity in brain

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141124162926.htm

UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes

Virtual Reality Affects Brain’s ‘GPS Cells’

http://www.livescience.com/49021-virtual-reality-brain-maps.html
a new study in rats shows that the virtual world affects the brain differently than real-world environments, which could offer clues for how the technology could be used to restore navigating ability and memory in humans.

Per Google Scholar:
http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=brain+and+virtual+reality&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=KvCMVKrHPIaayATNjYKADA&ved=0CB0QgQMwAA

Harnessing the Power of Play

Harnessing the Power of Play

http://mediasite.uvs.umn.edu/Mediasite/Viewer/?peid=c84b6d4a9c1d45bb838ac49123861d9a
http://cce.umn.edu/documents/CPE-General/November-17-Creative-Design-Webinar.pdf

play as game/gamification in the creative process

Please look at our blog entries on gaming and gamification: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

 

technology for early childhood students

Plan for today, Mon, Nov 17 class session:

Parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development.

  1. Introduce myself, who I am, who do I work with. Why is it good to know IMS and consider working with IMS. How to contact us – 5 min
  2. Start with a video from the following IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/ :
    http://youtu.be/d5kW4pI_VQw – 2 min. What is the video about, how do students think it relates to their class (parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development) – about 5 min
  3. Group work assignment – what is digital literacy and why is it important to people of all ages:
    Students work in groups and outline a definition of digital literacy and a list of 5 reasons about the importance – 5 min
    Study and discuss the following infographic (5 min)
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/16/early-learners-tech-use/
    For and against children spending time with technology. Gaming, social media, and computer use in general as addiction. “Disconnect/Unplugged” (Sherry Turkle) versus contemplative computing and similar meditative and contemplative practices: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/05/getting-unplugged/
  4. Discussion on how does digital literacy vary between age groups; how do people from different ages communicate. How do they work together and help each other when learning about digital literacy. Who is the best source for students to learn about digital literacy (hint – IMS ;)) – 10 min
    Suggested source for more information: The SlideShare presentation on the IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/: http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/etmooc-t3-s1-digital-literacies-with-dr-doug-belshaw
  5. Discussion on digital identity, digital citizenship, privacy and security. – 10 min
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/03/digital-identity-and-digital-citizenship/
  6. Questions and suggestions regarding

Gamification of the LMS

Please look at our blog entry:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/04/gamification-its-easier-than-you-think/

Gamification of the LMS – A Step Towards Evolution of the Modern LMS

http://www.gc-solutions.net/blog/gamification-of-the-lms-a-step-towards-evolution-of-the-modern-lms/

my note: article is written for the corporate world, but there is no reason why not apply in higher ed.

While applying gaming in learning content, we create timed quizzes, mazes and other such learning tools, which award the learner points, badges or other collectibles. The same mechanics are employed to embed gamification in our strategy for delivering content. Gamification provides an added incentive for learning, making the process of learning enjoyable through the excitement of built-in gaming elements.

two strongest components that help gaming to deliver effective learning – healthy competition between peers and asense of achievement.

  • Certificates
  • Collectible points that can be redeemed
  • Discounts on new content
  • Expert status
  • Special privileges in the portal
  • Fame on the Social Circuit: Leading professional networking site ‘LinkedIn’ has a popular gamification element that has worked very well among users.

Our WiZDOM LMS v5.0 is a new-age Learning Management System which has the built-in capabilities of gamification to make sure that the learner feels motivated to complete the e-courses and is able to have fun while doing it! But while employing game-based learning within the LMS, a few points need to be kept in mind:

  • Know your audience well
  • Provide real benefits
  • Keep a close eye
  • Keep evolving to make it fun

Gaming the college system

http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2014/09/difference-engine

In their latest book “Aspiring Adults Adrift”, sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, of New York University and the University of Virginia respectively, fear that universities focus too much these days on students’ social lives at the expense of academic rigor.

Two out of three students at American universities and colleges change their major at least once during their four years on campus; one in five does so two or three times.

parents should let their preferences be known, but then leave the selection proces to their daughter or son, hopefully guided by a school councillor rather than merely friends. Another piece of advice was to visit as many campuses as possible beforehand.

getting a university degree, even merely a baccalaureate, is worth it nowadays. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the median annual wage of Americans with a bachelor degree, and lucky enough to have found (not easy) full employment, was $48,000 last year, compared with a little over $25,000 for those with only a high-school diploma. But college graduates in the lower quartile made no more than $27,000.

 

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/05/math-science-history-games-break-boundaries-between-subjects-interdisciplinary-learning/

possibilities for a formal Renaissance-Man-Liberal-Arts education remain limited to the elite. The average, or common, student is encouraged to choose majors and institutions that track into a specialized vocation.

MincraftEDU and SimCityEDU provide flexible options for integrating familiar games with traditional classroom curriculum.

The ability to apply knowledge across disciplines is important, but it is not enough. It is important to combine that knowledge with strong social and emotional skills that serve as the foundation for good citizenship in the 21st Century.

The MindShift Guide to Games and Learning

more on gaming in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

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