Searching for "hybrid"

online learning attitudes

online learning attitudes

Students match their preference for hybrid learning with a belief that it is the most effective learning environment for them.

Despite the fact that faculty prefer teaching in a hybrid environment, they remain skeptical of online learning. Nearly half do not agree online 45% learning is effective.

https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2017/9/studentst2017infog.pdf

 

Students asked what technologies they wish their instructors used more, and we asked faculty what technologies they think could make them more effective instructors. Both agree that content and resource-focused technologies should be incorporated more and social media and tablets should be incorporated less.

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more on the use (or not) of ed technology in the classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

Embedded Librarianship in Online Courses

Embedded Librarianship in Online Courses

Instructor: Mimi O’Malley Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/081-embedded-online.php

Learning outcomes:

  • Discuss ways to incorporate library services through the learning management system level.
  • Examine bibliographic instruction in the virtual classroom through team teaching, guest lecturing.
  • Identify librarian roles during the design and development of online courses.
  • Assessing embedded librarianship efforts.

Mimi O’Malley is the learning technology translation strategist at Spalding University. She helps faculty prepare course content for hybrid and fully online courses in addition to incorporating open education resources into courses. She previously wrote and facilitated professional development courses and workshops at the Learning House, Inc. Mimi has presented workshops on online learning topics including assessment, plagiarism, copyright, and curriculum trends at the Learning House, Inc. CONNECT Users Conference, SLOAN-C ALN, Pencils and Pixels and New Horizons Teaching & Learning Conference. Interview with Mimi O’Malley

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more on embedded librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=embedded+librarian

Scopus webinar

Scopus Content: High quality, historical depth and expert curation

Bibliographic Indexing Leader

Register for the September 28th webinar

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/13703/275301

metadata: counts of papers by yer, researcher, institution, province, region and country. scientific fields subfields
metadata in one-credit course as a topic:

publisher – suppliers =- Elsevier processes – Scopus Data

h-index: The h-index is an author-level metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and citation impact of the publications of a scientist or scholar. The index is based on the set of the scientist’s most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications.

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https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9995/275813

Librarians and APIs 101: overview and use cases
Christina Harlow, Library Data Specialist;Jonathan Hartmann, Georgetown Univ Medical Center; Robert Phillips, Univ of Florida

https://zenodo.org/

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Slides | Research data literacy and the library from Library_Connect

 The era of e-science demands new skill sets and competencies of researchers to ensure their work is accessible, discoverable and reusable. Librarians are naturally positioned to assist in this education as part of their liaison and information literacy services.

Research data literacy and the library

Christian Lauersen, University of Copenhagen; Sarah Wright, Cornell University; Anita de Waard, Elsevier

https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/9995/226043

Data Literacy: access, assess, manipulate, summarize and present data

Statistical Literacy: think critically about basic stats in everyday media

Information Literacy: think critically about concepts; read, interpret, evaluate information

data information literacy: the ability to use, understand and manage data. the skills needed through the whole data life cycle.

Shield, Milo. “Information literacy, statistical literacy and data literacy.” I ASSIST Quarterly 28. 2/3 (2004): 6-11.

Carlson, J., Fosmire, M., Miller, C. C., & Nelson, M. S. (2011). Determining data information literacy needs: A study of students and research faculty. Portal: Libraries & the Academy, 11(2), 629-657.

data information literacy needs

embedded librarianship,

Courses developed: NTRESS 6600 research data management seminar. six sessions, one-credit mini course

http://guides.library.cornell.edu/ntres6600
BIOG 3020: Seminar in Research skills for biologists; one-credit semester long for undergrads. data management organization http://guides.library.cornell.edu/BIOG3020

lessons learned:

  • lack of formal training for students working with data.
  • faculty assumed that students have or should have acquired the competencies earlier
  • students were considered lacking in these competencies
  • the competencies were almost universally considered important by students and faculty interviewed

http://www.datainfolit.org/

http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/titles/format/9781612493527

ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies.

http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/dil/the-twelve-dil-competencies/

http://blogs.lib.purdue.edu/dil/what-is-data-information-literacy/

Johnston, L., & Carlson, J. (2015). Data Information Literacy : Librarians, Data and the Education of a New Generation of Researchers. Ashland: Purdue University Press.  http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dnlebk%26AN%3d987172%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

NEW ROLESFOR LIbRARIANS: DATAMANAgEMENTAND CURATION

the capacity to manage and curate research data has not kept pace with the ability to produce them (Hey & Hey, 2006). In recognition of this gap, the NSF and other funding agencies are now mandating that every grant proposal must include a DMP (NSF, 2010). These mandates highlight the benefits of producing well-described data that can be shared, understood, and reused by oth-ers, but they generally offer little in the way of guidance or instruction on how to address the inherent issues and challenges researchers face in complying. Even with increasing expecta-tions from funding agencies and research com-munities, such as the announcement by the White House for all federal funding agencies to better share research data (Holdren, 2013), the lack of data curation services tailored for the “small sciences,” the single investigators or small labs that typically comprise science prac-tice at universities, has been identified as a bar-rier in making research data more widely avail-able (Cragin, Palmer, Carlson, & Witt, 2010).Academic libraries, which support the re-search and teaching activities of their home institutions, are recognizing the need to de-velop services and resources in support of the evolving demands of the information age. The curation of research data is an area that librar-ians are well suited to address, and a num-ber of academic libraries are taking action to build capacity in this area (Soehner, Steeves, & Ward, 2010)

REIMAgININg AN ExISTINg ROLEOF LIbRARIANS: TEAChINg INFORMATION LITERACY SkILLS

By combining the use-based standards of information literacy with skill development across the whole data life cycle, we sought to support the practices of science by develop-ing a DIL curriculum and providing training for higher education students and research-ers. We increased ca-pacity and enabled comparative work by involving several insti-tutions in developing instruction in DIL. Finally, we grounded the instruction in the real-world needs as articu-lated by active researchers and their students from a variety of fields

Chapter 1 The development of the 12 DIL competencies is explained, and a brief compari-son is performed between DIL and information literacy, as defined by the 2000 ACRL standards.

chapter 2 thinking and approaches toward engaging researchers and students with the 12 competencies, a re-view of the literature on a variety of educational approaches to teaching data management and curation to students, and an articulation of our key assumptions in forming the DIL project.

Chapter 3 Journal of Digital Curation. http://www.ijdc.net/

http://www.dcc.ac.uk/digital-curation

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/19/digital-curation-2/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/06/digital-curation/

chapter 4 because these lon-gitudinal data cannot be reproduced, acquiring the skills necessary to work with databases and to handle data entry was described as essential. Interventions took place in a classroom set-ting through a spring 2013 semester one-credit course entitled Managing Data to Facilitate Your Research taught by this DIL team.

chapter 5 embedded librar-ian approach of working with the teaching as-sistants (TAs) to develop tools and resources to teach undergraduate students data management skills as a part of their EPICS experience.
Lack of organization and documentation presents a bar-rier to (a) successfully transferring code to new students who will continue its development, (b) delivering code and other project outputs to the community client, and (c) the center ad-ministration’s ability to understand and evalu-ate the impact on student learning.
skill sessions to deliver instruction to team lead-ers, crafted a rubric for measuring the quality of documenting code and other data, served as critics in student design reviews, and attended student lab sessions to observe and consult on student work

chapter 6 Although the faculty researcher had created formal policies on data management practices for his lab, this case study demonstrated that students’ adherence to these guidelines was limited at best. Similar patterns arose in discus-sions concerning the quality of metadata. This case study addressed a situation in which stu-dents are at least somewhat aware of the need to manage their data;

chapter 7 University of Minnesota team to design and implement a hybrid course to teach DIL com-petencies to graduate students in civil engi-neering.
stu-dents’ abilities to understand and track issues affecting the quality of the data, the transfer of data from their custody to the custody of the lab upon graduation, and the steps neces-sary to maintain the value and utility of the data over time.

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more on Scopus in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=scopus

faculty support group meetings

The lecture-capture / course-capture group meets on October 5, 2017, 3PM in Miller Center 205:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/coursecapture/2017/09/12/fall-2017-meeting-support-group/

The online/hybrid teaching group meeting will be determined after taking this poll:
https://doodle.com/poll/cq3g5zpei6dfwcme

(as per blog announcement: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/blendedonline/2017/09/12/first-meeting-for-fall-2017/)

blended learning implementation

Critical Factors for Implementing Blended Learning in Higher Education.

Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318191000_Critical_Factors_for_Implementing_Blended_Learning_in_Higher_Education [accessed Jul 6, 2017].

Definition of Blended learning

Blended learning is in one dimension broadly defined as “The convergence of online and face-to-face Education” as in the study by Watson (2008). At the same time it is important to also include the dimension of technology and media use as it has been depicted in the multimodal conceptual model in Figure 1 below. This conceptual model was proposed and presented in an article published by Picciano (2009). Critical Factors for Implementing Blended Learning in Higher Education.

 

online face to face hybrid

 

 

 

Several studies that argue for the need to focus on pedagogy and learning objectives and not solely on technology (Hoffinan, 2006; Garrison & Vaughan, 2008; Al amm ary et al., 2014; McGee & Reis, 2012; Shand, Glassett Farrelly & Costa, 2016). Other findings in this study are that technology still is a critical issue (So & Brush, 2008; Fleming, Becker & Newton, 2017), not least in developing regions (AI Busaidi & Al-Shihi, 2012; Raphae1 & Mtebe, 2016), and also the more positive idea of technology as a supporting factor for innovative didactics and instructional design to satisfy the needs in heterogeneous student groups (Picciano, 2009). Critical Factors for Implementing Blended Learning in Higher Education.

Critical factors:

  1. technology
  2. didactics –  pedagogy, instructional design and the teacher role
  3. Course outcomes – learning outcomes and learner satisfaction
  4. collaboration and social presence
  5. course design
  6. the heritage from technology enhanced distance courses
  7. multimodal overload
  8. trends and hypes
  9. economy

Blended learning perspectives

  1. the university perspective
  2. the Learner perspective
  3. the Teacher perspective
  4. the Global perspective

 

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more on blended learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+learning

Blended Synchronous Learning Environment

Wang, Q., Quek, C., & Hu, H. (2017). Designing and Improving a Blended Synchronous Learning Environment : An Educational Design Research. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 18(3), 99-118

http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/3034/4142

Definition: blended synchronous learning has attracted much attention and it is often labelled with synchronous hybrid learning (Cain & Henriksen 2013); synchronous blended learning (Okita, 201 3 ); multi – access learning (Irvine, Code, & Richards, 2013); or simultaneous delivery of course s to on – campus and off – campus students (White et al ., 2010). Adapted from the definition given by Bower , Dalgarno, Kennedy, Lee, and Kenney (2015), blended synchronous learning in this paper is defined as a learning method that enables online students to participate in classroom learning activities simultaneously via comput er – mediated communication technologies such as video conferencing . By following this approach , on – campus students attend F2F le ssons in the physical classroom. M eanwhile, online students who are situated at multiple sites participate in the identical class room learning activities via two – way video conferencing in real time .

With regard to  educational benefits , blended synchronous learning can help to establish rich teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence ( Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 200 0 ; Szeto, 2015 ). A BSLE provides a mimic classroom environment (White et al. , 2010) , where teachers ’ direct instruction and facilitation can be easily carried out a nd the teaching presence is hence naturally established.

TPR presentation

Presentation to TPR (Technology and Pedagogy Roundtable), April 19, 2017
WSB 335 | short link: http://tinyurl.com/tprIMS

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I am faculty (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/) with InforMedia Services (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/):

https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/
https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc
https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760

Through the years, I am working with the application of educational technologies in the curriculum process.

During my work and research, I notice an important discussion in the community of higher education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

The topic of the use of electronic devices, being that laptops, and more recently smartphones, tablets 2in1 laptops (or hybrid laptops) has been a disputable issue among instructors.

Under the tutelage of TPR, I am offering to facilitate a campus-wide discussion on the use of electronic devices in the classroom. The short-range goal of such discussion is to provide a platform for SCSU instructors to share their pedagogical experience in handling the use of electronic devices in the classroom.

The long-range goal of such discussion will be to start a conversation among SCSU faculty about the didactic of educational technology; going beyond just learning technology and start building practices for successful use of technology for teaching and learning.

 

definition of blended learning

The Definition Of Blended Learning

January 18, 2013 http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/the-definition-of-blended-learning/

the Sloan Consortium defined hybrid courses as those that “integrate online with traditional face-to-face class activities in a planned, pedagogically valuable manner.” Educators probably disagree on what qualifies as “pedagogically valuable,” but the essence is clear: Hybrid education uses online technology to not just supplement, but transform and improve the learning process.

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more on blended / hybrid learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended

students evals online learning

The Online Discussion group for Blended and Online Learning leads an interesting discussion on course evaluations; here are the highlights:

Perceptions-of-Online-Learning–Analysis-of-Online-Course-Evaluations-tbz6om

When we first started in 1999, we included ~10 questions in addition to our standard  questions that were different for online courses.  This information was particularly useful as we grew our online offerings (i.e. Would you take another online course.  93-5% answered yes consistently. How would you rate the level of interactivity between you and the instructor?  Between you and the other students?)  These were administered via SurveyMonkey because there were no online evaluation services back then.

Now we have a single evaluation that is administered to all students regardless of the delivery format (online, hybrid, blended, F2F or intensive)  The questions were designed to be relevant regardless of the delivery format.  All of these evaluations are administered online…which has its downsides (e.g. response rate is less especially compared to what was captured in F2F classes in the past.)   We continue to explore ways to increase the response rate.

Reta Chaffee Director of Educational Technology-Academic Affairs Granite State College 25  Hall Street Concord, NH 03301 (603) 513-1350

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On Behalf Of Krajewski, Scott
Sent: Friday, February 17, 2017 1:00 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Course Evaluations

Hi Hala, We have a standard online evaluation form for all courses.  We do add 3 questions to the sports courses but otherwise we’re 100% standardized.  We have a ton of info at

http://inside.augsburg.edu/ctl/resources/augsburg-resources-and-support/course-evaluations/

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You might find this study (or the related literature) helpful — http://patricklowenthal.com/publications/Student-Perceptions-of-Online-Learning–Analysis-of-Online-Course-Evaluations.pdf

Patrick Patrick R. Lowenthal | Associate Professor Educational Technology, Boise State  University   http://www.patricklowenthal.com

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On Behalf Of Rob Gibson
Sent: Friday, February 17, 2017 8:39 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Course Evaluations

 

We use the IDEA evaluation framework combined with CampusLabs as the delivery engine.

  • IDEA is a well-established evaluation process dating back to the 1970s.
  • The CampusLabs delivery process (new as of about 2 years ago) provides students with a single URL to complete their evaluations – on-campus or on-line. Mobile friendly.
  • It uses the same base evaluation criteria across the university. (That’s how IDEA is able to substantiate reliability and validity.) IDEA is matched against a national database using a CIP code. Hence, faculty can gather comparative data of their course against other similar courses in the university, or at the national level.
  • While each department uses the same basic framework, there are modification that can be made. For example, custom questions can be added to the eval (these fall outside the scope of the comparative data) and the learning objectives can be modified by course, department, school, college. We have one School that has custom learning objectives for each course in their program. Objectives are set using a 3 point Likert scale.

Very easy to set up a survey administration. Data is retrievable within 48 hours after close.
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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

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