Searching for "learning spaces"

learning spaces and stem students

The Next 10 Years: Helping STEM Students Thrive series, on January 10th, from 12-1:30 PM ET. The topic will be learning spaces with the following guest speakers:

  • Jeanne L. Narum, Principal, Learning Spaces Collaboratory

Jeanne will discuss what she has learned about what works, why and how it works in achieving sustainable institutional transformation in the world of planning spaces for learning in the undergraduate setting.

  • Lisa Stephens, Sr. Strategist- SUNY Academic Innovation – University at Buffalo
  • Rebecca Rotundo, Instructional Technology Specialist, University at Buffalo

Lisa and Rebecca will share their experience in FLEXspace (Flexible Learning Environments eXchange) an open education repository project which has expanded to over 2,600+ users from 1,200+ educational institutions across 42 countries.

  • Xin Li, Associate University Librarian, Cornell

Xin will share information about the Library’s initiative to install a Portal on the Cornell campus in Sept. 2018, with the goal to engage faculty, students, and the community in live conversations with Portal users in different countries, cultures, or life circumstances, such as what others do for STEM education.

For more information on the speakers and to register and log into the event please go tohttps://gateway.shindig.com/event/learningspaces

This collaboration between Cornell University and the University at Buffalo featuring the perspectives of national thought leaders and institutional representatives about expanding the participation of women in undergraduate STEM education at different scales.

This interactive, online series features a different topic per month. Each session kicks off with an introduction by our distinguished thought leaders followed by institutional representatives from Cornell University and the University at Buffalo who will share insights from their campuses. Participants may join the conversation, ask questions, share experiences, build networks and learn more about:

·         Innovations that can expand female or underrepresented minority student participation and success in STEM undergraduate education.

·         Effective evidence-based STEM teaching practices commonly adopted at research universities.

·         Unique institutional and cultural challenges to achieving STEM diversity.

·         What difference at scale looks like.

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more on learning spaces in academic environment in this iMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+spaces

teaching and learning spaces for VR and AR

Planning a Teaching and Learning Space for Virtual and Augmented Reality

Tuesday, November 14, 2017 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Planning a Teaching and Learning Space for Virtual and Augmented Reality

Dr. James P. Frazee is the Senior Academic Technology Officer and Director of Instructional Technology Services (ITS) at San Diego State University.

  • The “What”: Defining the Space
  • The “Why”: Making a Case
    • Incubator for research
    • Promotes experimentation
    • Leveraging partnerships with industry players
    • Opportunity to highlight technology
  • The “How”: Designing and Implementing
    • Designing the space

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more on VR in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

bibliography on K12 learning spaces

Bibliography on K12 learning spaces

articles in popular print:

2nd Annual Next Generation Learning Spaces Asia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.learningspacesasia.com/
10 Tips For Creating Inspiring Learning Spaces Infographic. (2016, January 26). Retrieved from http://elearninginfographics.com/10-tips-creating-inspiring-learning-spaces-infographic/
Active Learning Spaces. (n.d.-a). K-12 Blueprint. Retrieved from https://www.k12blueprint.com/toolkits/active-learning-spaces
Active Learning Spaces. (n.d.-b). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://www.pinterest.com/k12blueprint/active-learning-spaces/
Architecture’s Pivotal Role in the Future of K 12 Learning (EdSurge News). (2016, July 11). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-07-11-the-secret-to-architecture-s-pivotal-role-in-the-future-of-k-12-learning
Bruff, D. (2013, December 19). Flexible Classrooms: Highlights from #Spaces4Learning | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/2013/12/flexible-classrooms-highlights-from-spaces4learning/
Educational Furniture : KI. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.ki.com/markets/educational-furniture/
Elfring, L. (n.d.). UA-AAU STEM Collaborative Learning Spaces Project. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://serc.carleton.edu/StemEdCenters/prog_descriptions/138212.html
fellow, E. S. T. E. is a senior, leadership, thought leader on digital leadership with the I. C. for L. in E. H. also runs a blog on K.-12, & Reflections, A. P. (2016, February 9). 5 Ways Digital Tools Are Transforming the Education Space [Text]. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2016/02/5-ways-digital-tools-are-transforming-education-space
Homeschooling Articles – Homeschool.com – The #1 Homeschooling Community. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.homeschool.com/articles/LaurelSprings17/
Jakes, D. (2014, August 26). All About Design – Strategies for Rethinking Learning Spaces. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://www.k12blueprint.com/blog/david-jakes/all-about-design-strategies-rethinking-learning-spaces
K12 Learning Space. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSHJC7Ue4lYin2Y2YuJ9YKg
K12 learning spaces playbook. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://issuu.com/kberg5280/docs/k12_learning_spaces_playbook
Kurani, D. (2015, April 1). 10 Reasons To Re-Design Your School Space. Retrieved from https://kurani.us/portfolio/10-reasons-to-redesign-your-school-space/
Luchs, S. (2016, February 23). Using Space to Realize a Next Gen Learning Vision | NextGen Learning. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://nextgenlearning.org/blog/using-space-realize-next-gen-learning-vision
New Learning Environments for 21st Century Learners. (2016, August 27). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.bobpearlman.org/Learning21/new%20learning%20environments.htm
Persaud, R. (2014, September 8). Why Learning Space Matters. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/why-learning-space-matters-ramona-persaud
Pierce, B. D., & 08/25/15. (n.d.). 3 Ways Mobile Technology Is Transforming Learning Spaces -. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://thejournal.com/articles/2015/08/25/3-ways-mobile-technology-is-transforming-learning-spaces.aspx
Reimagining Space, Time & Staffing. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://library.educause.edu/resources/2016/9/reimagining-space-time-and-staffing
Re-Thinking Learning Spaces | Tech Learning. (2013, October 25). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.techlearning.com/news/0002/rethinking-learning-spaces/63044
Seidel, V. P., & Fixson, S. K. (2013). Adopting Design Thinking in Novice Multidisciplinary Teams: The Application and Limits of Design Methods and Reflexive Practices: Adopting Design Thinking in Novice Teams. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 30, 19–33. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpim.12061
Slowakiewicz, M. (2016, March 22). STEM School Learning Spaces. Retrieved from http://www.corbettinc.com/blog/?p=3581
Using Social Media as Learning Spaces. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/using-social-media-learning-spaces
Vickery. (2014, August 18). Are You Hacking Your School’s Learning Spaces? Retrieved October 12, 2016, from http://www.middleweb.com/17033/hacking-schools-learning-spaces/
peer-reviewed articles:
Razavi, M. N., & Iverson, L. (2007). Designing for privacy in personal learning spaces. New Review Of Hypermedia & Multimedia, 13(2), 163-185. doi:10.1080/13614560701709861
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d27777699%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite
Jung, I., & Latchem, C. (2011). A model for e-education: Extended teaching spaces and extended learning spaces. British Journal Of Educational Technology, 42(1), 6-18. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00987.x
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d57417106%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

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more on learning spaces in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+space

Learning Spaces and Instructional Technology

Special Interest Group: Learning Spaces and Instructional Technology (SIG) webinars are FREE and open to anyone. Please feel free to share this with others at your institution.

Dynamic Discussion Artifacts: Moving Beyond Threaded Discussion

Description

This session will describe an approach to online discussions that moves beyond the threaded message boards of D2L Brightspace, yet still maintained an asynchronous online delivery. Using teams, discussions were differentiated by product to allow students to turn in an artifact that represented their shared understanding during specific online course modules.  Strategies, Technology guides, rubrics, and student feedback will be shared.

Presenter: Michael Manderfeld
Senior Instructional Designer
Minnesota State University Mankato

When
Where
https://moqi.zoom.us/j/672493176 (link to virtual room)

 

 

Notes from the previous session available here:

Active Learning Classrooms

game based learning

How Game-Based Learning Empowers Students for the Future

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-22-its-2019-so-why-do-21st-century-skills-still-matter

educators’ guide to game-based learning, packed with resources for gaming gurus and greenhorns alike.

How are schools and districts preparing students for future opportunities? What is the impact of game-based learning?

It’s 2019. So Why Do 21st-Century Skills Still Matter?

By Suzie Boss     Jan 22, 2019

21st-century trends such as makerspaces, flipped learning, genius hour, gamification, and more.

EdLeader21, a national network of Battelle for Kids.has developed a toolkit to guide districts and independent schools in developing their own “portrait of a graduate” as a visioning exercise. In some communities, global citizenship rises to the top of the wish list of desired outcomes. Others emphasize entrepreneurship, civic engagement, or traits like persistence or self-management.

ISTE Standards for Students highlight digital citizenship and computational thinking as key skills that will enable students to thrive as empowered learners. The U.S. Department of Education describes a globally competent student as one who can investigate the world, weigh perspectives, communicate effectively with diverse audiences, and take action.

Frameworks provide mental models, but “don’t usually help educators know what to do differently,” argues technology leadership expert Scott McLeod in his latest book, Harnessing Technology for Deeper Learning. He and co-author Julie Graber outline deliberate shifts that help teachers redesign traditional lessons to emphasize goals such as critical thinking, authenticity, and conceptual understanding.

1. Wondering how to teach and assess 21st-century competencies? The Buck Institute for Education offers a wide range of resources, including the book, PBL for 21st Century Success: Teaching Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, and Creativity (Boss, 2013), and downloadable rubrics for each of the 4Cs.

2. For more strategies about harnessing technology for deeper learning,listen to the EdSurge podcast featuring edtech expert and author Scott McLeod.

3. Eager to see 21st-century learning in action? Getting Smart offers suggestions for using school visits as a springboard for professional learning, including a list of recommended sites. Bob Pearlman, a leader in 21st century learning, offers more recommendations.

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more on game- based learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=game+based

ELI 2018 Key Issues Teaching Learning

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning

https://www.educause.edu/eli/initiatives/key-issues-in-teaching-and-learning

A roster of results since 2011 is here.

ELI 2018 key issues

1. Academic Transformation

2. Accessibility and UDL

3. Faculty Development

4. Privacy and Security

5. Digital and Information Literacies

https://cdn.nmc.org/media/2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II.pdf
Three Models of Digital Literacy: Universal, Creative, Literacy Across Disciplines

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to focus on educational policy details and personal empowerment, the latter encouraging learners to become more effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself, while still trying to grow economies in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and subsequent financial pressures

African digital literacy is more business-oriented.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can also represent a drive to produce more locally-sourced content, as opposed to consuming material from abroad, which may elicit criticism of neocolonialism or religious challenges.

p. 14 Digital literacy for Humanities: What does it mean to be digitally literate in history, literature, or philosophy? Creativity in these disciplines often involves textuality, given the large role writing plays in them, as, for example, in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s instructor’s guide. In the digital realm, this can include web-based writing through social media, along with the creation of multimedia projects through posters, presentations, and video. Information literacy remains a key part of digital literacy in the humanities. The digital humanities movement has not seen much connection with digital literacy, unfortunately, but their alignment seems likely, given the turn toward using digital technologies to explore humanities questions. That development could then foster a spread of other technologies and approaches to the rest of the humanities, including mapping, data visualization, text mining, web-based digital archives, and “distant reading” (working with very large bodies of texts). The digital humanities’ emphasis on making projects may also increase

Digital Literacy for Business: Digital literacy in this world is focused on manipulation of data, from spreadsheets to more advanced modeling software, leading up to degrees in management information systems. Management classes unsurprisingly focus on how to organize people working on and with digital tools.

Digital Literacy for Computer Science: Naturally, coding appears as a central competency within this discipline. Other aspects of the digital world feature prominently, including hardware and network architecture. Some courses housed within the computer science discipline offer a deeper examination of the impact of computing on society and politics, along with how to use digital tools. Media production plays a minor role here, beyond publications (posters, videos), as many institutions assign multimedia to other departments. Looking forward to a future when automation has become both more widespread and powerful, developing artificial intelligence projects will potentially play a role in computer science literacy.

6. Integrated Planning and Advising Systems for Student Success (iPASS)

7. Instructional Design

8. Online and Blended Learning

In traditional instruction, students’ first contact with new ideas happens in class, usually through direct instruction from the professor; after exposure to the basics, students are turned out of the classroom to tackle the most difficult tasks in learning — those that involve application, analysis, synthesis, and creativity — in their individual spaces. Flipped learning reverses this, by moving first contact with new concepts to the individual space and using the newly-expanded time in class for students to pursue difficult, higher-level tasks together, with the instructor as a guide.

Let’s take a look at some of the myths about flipped learning and try to find the facts.

Myth: Flipped learning is predicated on recording videos for students to watch before class.

Fact: Flipped learning does not require video. Although many real-life implementations of flipped learning use video, there’s nothing that says video must be used. In fact, one of the earliest instances of flipped learning — Eric Mazur’s peer instruction concept, used in Harvard physics classes — uses no video but rather an online text outfitted with social annotation software. And one of the most successful public instances of flipped learning, an edX course on numerical methods designed by Lorena Barba of George Washington University, uses precisely one video. Video is simply not necessary for flipped learning, and many alternatives to video can lead to effective flipped learning environments [http://rtalbert.org/flipped-learning-without-video/].

Myth: Flipped learning replaces face-to-face teaching.

Fact: Flipped learning optimizes face-to-face teaching. Flipped learning may (but does not always) replace lectures in class, but this is not to say that it replaces teaching. Teaching and “telling” are not the same thing.

Myth: Flipped learning has no evidence to back up its effectiveness.

Fact: Flipped learning research is growing at an exponential pace and has been since at least 2014. That research — 131 peer-reviewed articles in the first half of 2017 alone — includes results from primary, secondary, and postsecondary education in nearly every discipline, most showing significant improvements in student learning, motivation, and critical thinking skills.

Myth: Flipped learning is a fad.

Fact: Flipped learning has been with us in the form defined here for nearly 20 years.

Myth: People have been doing flipped learning for centuries.

Fact: Flipped learning is not just a rebranding of old techniques. The basic concept of students doing individually active work to encounter new ideas that are then built upon in class is almost as old as the university itself. So flipped learning is, in a real sense, a modern means of returning higher education to its roots. Even so, flipped learning is different from these time-honored techniques.

Myth: Students and professors prefer lecture over flipped learning.

Fact: Students and professors embrace flipped learning once they understand the benefits. It’s true that professors often enjoy their lectures, and students often enjoy being lectured to. But the question is not who “enjoys” what, but rather what helps students learn the best.They know what the research says about the effectiveness of active learning

Assertion: Flipped learning provides a platform for implementing active learning in a way that works powerfully for students.

9. Evaluating Technology-based Instructional Innovations

Transitioning to an ROI lens requires three fundamental shifts
What is the total cost of my innovation, including both new spending and the use of existing resources?

What’s the unit I should measure that connects cost with a change in performance?

How might the expected change in student performance also support a more sustainable financial model?

The Exposure Approach: we don’t provide a way for participants to determine if they learned anything new or now have the confidence or competence to apply what they learned.

The Exemplar Approach: from ‘show and tell’ for adults to show, tell, do and learn.

The Tutorial Approach: Getting a group that can meet at the same time and place can be challenging. That is why many faculty report a preference for self-paced professional development.build in simple self-assessment checks. We can add prompts that invite people to engage in some sort of follow up activity with a colleague. We can also add an elective option for faculty in a tutorial to actually create or do something with what they learned and then submit it for direct or narrative feedback.

The Course Approach: a non-credit format, these have the benefits of a more structured and lengthy learning experience, even if they are just three to five-week short courses that meet online or in-person once every week or two.involve badges, portfolios, peer assessment, self-assessment, or one-on-one feedback from a facilitator

The Academy Approach: like the course approach, is one that tends to be a deeper and more extended experience. People might gather in a cohort over a year or longer.Assessment through coaching and mentoring, the use of portfolios, peer feedback and much more can be easily incorporated to add a rich assessment element to such longer-term professional development programs.

The Mentoring Approach: The mentors often don’t set specific learning goals with the mentee. Instead, it is often a set of structured meetings, but also someone to whom mentees can turn with questions and tips along the way.

The Coaching Approach: A mentor tends to be a broader type of relationship with a person.A coaching relationship tends to be more focused upon specific goals, tasks or outcomes.

The Peer Approach:This can be done on a 1:1 basis or in small groups, where those who are teaching the same courses are able to compare notes on curricula and teaching models. They might give each other feedback on how to teach certain concepts, how to write syllabi, how to handle certain teaching and learning challenges, and much more. Faculty might sit in on each other’s courses, observe, and give feedback afterward.

The Self-Directed Approach:a self-assessment strategy such as setting goals and creating simple checklists and rubrics to monitor our progress. Or, we invite feedback from colleagues, often in a narrative and/or informal format. We might also create a portfolio of our work, or engage in some sort of learning journal that documents our thoughts, experiments, experiences, and learning along the way.

The Buffet Approach:

10. Open Education

Figure 1. A Model for Networked Education (Credit: Image by Catherine Cronin, building on
Interpretations of
Balancing Privacy and Openness (Credit: Image by Catherine Cronin. CC BY-SA)

11. Learning Analytics

12. Adaptive Teaching and Learning

13. Working with Emerging Technology

In 2014, administrators at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina, began talks with members of the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges and North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) leadership about starting a CBE program.

Building on an existing project at CPCC for identifying the elements of a digital learning environment (DLE), which was itself influenced by the EDUCAUSE publication The Next Generation Digital Learning Environment: A Report on Research,1 the committee reached consensus on a DLE concept and a shared lexicon: the “Digital Learning Environment Operational Definitions,

Figure 1. NC-CBE Digital Learning Environment

metaliterate learning

Metaliterate Learning for the Post-Truth World to be Published this Fall!

definition:

Metaliteracy is a pedagogical model for ensuring that learners successfully participate in collaborative information environments, including social media and online communities.

Metaliteracy supports reflective learning through metacognitive thinking, the ethical production of new knowledge, the critical consumption of information, and the responsible sharing of verifiable content across media platforms. Through metaliteracy, learners are envisioned as teachers in collaborative social spaces. This book examines the newest version of the Metaliteracy Goals and Learning Objectives, including the four domains of metaliterate learning.

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more on metaliteraices in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=metaliteracies

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning Survey

The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative has just launched its 2018 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning Survey, so vote today: http://www.tinyurl.com/ki2018.

Each year, the ELI surveys the teaching and learning community in order to discover the key issues and themes in teaching and learning. These top issues provide the thematic foundation or basis for all of our conversations, courses, and publications for the coming year. Longitudinally they also provide the way to track the evolving discourse in the teaching and learning space. More information about this annual survey can be found at https://www.educause.edu/eli/initiatives/key-issues-in-teaching-and-learning.

ACADEMIC TRANSFORMATION (Holistic models supporting student success, leadership competencies for academic transformation, partnerships and collaborations across campus, IT transformation, academic transformation that is broad, strategic, and institutional in scope)

ACCESSIBILITY AND UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING (Supporting and educating the academic community in effective practice; intersections with instructional delivery modes; compliance issues)

ADAPTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING (Digital courseware; adaptive technology; implications for course design and the instructor’s role; adaptive approaches that are not technology-based; integration with LMS; use of data to improve learner outcomes)

COMPETENCY-BASED EDUCATION AND NEW METHODS FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING (Developing collaborative cultures of assessment that bring together faculty, instructional designers, accreditation coordinators, and technical support personnel, real world experience credit)

DIGITAL AND INFORMATION LITERACIES (Student and faculty literacies; research skills; data discovery, management, and analysis skills; information visualization skills; partnerships for literacy programs; evaluation of student digital competencies; information evaluation)

EVALUATING TECHNOLOGY-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL INNOVATIONS (Tools and methods to gather data; data analysis techniques; qualitative vs. quantitative data; evaluation project design; using findings to change curricular practice; scholarship of teaching and learning; articulating results to stakeholders; just-in-time evaluation of innovations). here is my bibliographical overview on Big Data (scroll down to “Research literature”http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/07/irdl-proposal/ )

EVOLUTION OF THE TEACHING AND LEARNING SUPPORT PROFESSION (Professional skills for T&L support; increasing emphasis on instructional design; delineating the skills, knowledge, business acumen, and political savvy for success; role of inter-institutional communities of practices and consortia; career-oriented professional development planning)

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT (Incentivizing faculty innovation; new roles for faculty and those who support them; evidence of impact on student learning/engagement of faculty development programs; faculty development intersections with learning analytics; engagement with student success)

GAMIFICATION OF LEARNING (Gamification designs for course activities; adaptive approaches to gamification; alternate reality games; simulations; technological implementation options for faculty)

INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN (Skills and competencies for designers; integration of technology into the profession; role of data in design; evolution of the design profession (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/04/instructional-design-3/); effective leadership and collaboration with faculty)

INTEGRATED PLANNING AND ADVISING FOR STUDENT SUCCESS (Change management and campus leadership; collaboration across units; integration of technology systems and data; dashboard design; data visualization (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+visualization); counseling and coaching advising transformation; student success analytics)

LEARNING ANALYTICS (Leveraging open data standards; privacy and ethics; both faculty and student facing reports; implementing; learning analytics to transform other services; course design implications)

LEARNING SPACE DESIGNS (Makerspaces; funding; faculty development; learning designs across disciplines; supporting integrated campus planning; ROI; accessibility/UDL; rating of classroom designs)

MICRO-CREDENTIALING AND DIGITAL BADGING (Design of badging hierarchies; stackable credentials; certificates; role of open standards; ways to publish digital badges; approaches to meta-data; implications for the transcript; Personalized learning transcripts and blockchain technology (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

MOBILE LEARNING (Curricular use of mobile devices (here previous blog postings on this issue:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/25/mc218-remodel/; innovative curricular apps; approaches to use in the classroom; technology integration into learning spaces; BYOD issues and opportunities)

MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TECHNOLOGIES (Virtual, augmented, mixed, and immersive reality; video walls; integration with learning spaces; scalability, affordability, and accessibility; use of mobile devices; multi-dimensional printing and artifact creation)

NEXT-GENERATION DIGITAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS AND LMS SERVICES (Open standards; learning environments architectures (here previous blog postings on this issue: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/digital-learning/; social learning environments; customization and personalization; OER integration; intersections with learning modalities such as adaptive, online, etc.; LMS evaluation, integration and support)

ONLINE AND BLENDED TEACHING AND LEARNING (Flipped course models; leveraging MOOCs in online learning; course development models; intersections with analytics; humanization of online courses; student engagement)

OPEN EDUCATION (Resources, textbooks, content; quality and editorial issues; faculty development; intersections with student success/access; analytics; licensing; affordability; business models; accessibility and sustainability)

PRIVACY AND SECURITY (Formulation of policies on privacy and data protection; increased sharing of data via open standards for internal and external purposes; increased use of cloud-based and third party options; education of faculty, students, and administrators)

WORKING WITH EMERGING LEARNING TECHNOLOGY (Scalability and diffusion; effective piloting practices; investments; faculty development; funding; evaluation methods and rubrics; interoperability; data-driven decision-making)

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learning and teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=teaching+and+learning

Library 2.0 Makerspaces

Library 2.017: Makerspaces

Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 2-5PM

registering

organized in partnership with Heather Moorefield-Lang, who will serve as moderator for the opening panel and as the closing keynote speaker: “There has been a lot of talk about makerspaces in libraries over the past four years. If you are unsure what makerspaces are, think of them as creative locations for tinkering, collaborating, problem solving, and creating in a library or educational space. No matter how many maker learning spaces you may visit, you will quickly notice no two are the same. Each librarian and makerspace delivers their own brand of service to their individual community. Attendees will investigate how librarians with makerspaces can create new partnerships and collaborative efforts in and with their communities, offering further services and methods to meet patron needs.”
Joining Heather for the opening hour will be: Dr. June Abbas, PhD, a Professor in the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Oklahoma, Norman campus; Leanne Bowler, Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh; Kristin Fontichiaro, clinical associate professor at the University of Michigan School Information; Kyungwon Koh, assistant professor at the University of Oklahoma School of Library and Information Studies.

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more on Makerspaces and libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=makerspaces

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