Searching for "online learning"

online learning report

GoConqr Online Learning Report

https://info.goconqr.com/files/2017/02/2017-GoConqr-Online-Learning-Report.pdf

2017-GoConqr-Online-Learning-Report-2017

http://www.ecampusnews.com/online-learning/students-online-learning-trends/

Some of the most outstanding findings we found in this report are:

• Despite the prevalence of social networking, online study tends to be a solitary activity: 79% of people choose not to study collaboratively when they are online.

• Students are using online platforms as an additional source to help with difficult subjects Students from non-native English speaking countries are more likely to use online tools for language learning than native English speakers are.

• Learning is lower down the list of priorities for users of mobile devices. Using mobile devices for education is quite low compared to other activities

• There is a strong trend towards visually engaging material , an area in which the offline world simply cannot compete with the online one

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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

students evals online learning

The Online Discussion group for Blended and Online Learning leads an interesting discussion on course evaluations; here are the highlights:

Perceptions-of-Online-Learning–Analysis-of-Online-Course-Evaluations-tbz6om

When we first started in 1999, we included ~10 questions in addition to our standard  questions that were different for online courses.  This information was particularly useful as we grew our online offerings (i.e. Would you take another online course.  93-5% answered yes consistently. How would you rate the level of interactivity between you and the instructor?  Between you and the other students?)  These were administered via SurveyMonkey because there were no online evaluation services back then.

Now we have a single evaluation that is administered to all students regardless of the delivery format (online, hybrid, blended, F2F or intensive)  The questions were designed to be relevant regardless of the delivery format.  All of these evaluations are administered online…which has its downsides (e.g. response rate is less especially compared to what was captured in F2F classes in the past.)   We continue to explore ways to increase the response rate.

Reta Chaffee Director of Educational Technology-Academic Affairs Granite State College 25  Hall Street Concord, NH 03301 (603) 513-1350

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On Behalf Of Krajewski, Scott
Sent: Friday, February 17, 2017 1:00 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Course Evaluations

Hi Hala, We have a standard online evaluation form for all courses.  We do add 3 questions to the sports courses but otherwise we’re 100% standardized.  We have a ton of info at

http://inside.augsburg.edu/ctl/resources/augsburg-resources-and-support/course-evaluations/

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You might find this study (or the related literature) helpful — http://patricklowenthal.com/publications/Student-Perceptions-of-Online-Learning–Analysis-of-Online-Course-Evaluations.pdf

Patrick Patrick R. Lowenthal | Associate Professor Educational Technology, Boise State  University   http://www.patricklowenthal.com

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On Behalf Of Rob Gibson
Sent: Friday, February 17, 2017 8:39 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Course Evaluations

 

We use the IDEA evaluation framework combined with CampusLabs as the delivery engine.

  • IDEA is a well-established evaluation process dating back to the 1970s.
  • The CampusLabs delivery process (new as of about 2 years ago) provides students with a single URL to complete their evaluations – on-campus or on-line. Mobile friendly.
  • It uses the same base evaluation criteria across the university. (That’s how IDEA is able to substantiate reliability and validity.) IDEA is matched against a national database using a CIP code. Hence, faculty can gather comparative data of their course against other similar courses in the university, or at the national level.
  • While each department uses the same basic framework, there are modification that can be made. For example, custom questions can be added to the eval (these fall outside the scope of the comparative data) and the learning objectives can be modified by course, department, school, college. We have one School that has custom learning objectives for each course in their program. Objectives are set using a 3 point Likert scale.

Very easy to set up a survey administration. Data is retrievable within 48 hours after close.
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more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

synchronous online learning

Creating Collaborative, Interactive & Engaging Online Learning Environments with Shindig

Shindig Interactive Video Chat for Canvas LMS, February 6, 2:00 – 3:00pm (EST)

Shindig recently announced its integration with Canvas by Instructure, bringing the former’s video chat platform to the learning management system.

Attend this webinar to learn how instructors can instantly schedule, customize and launch Shindig sessions directly from within the Canvas LMS, as well as automatically add the video chat sessions to students’ schedules.

Learn about the positive impact of collaborative and interactive learning environments on student success first-hand from educators and instructional technologists from leading universities. This session will highlight different use cases Shindig can be utilized for, including course delivery, office hours, guest speakers, workshops and more.

Early adopters of the Shindig platform will also be sharing highlight videos of their use of the platform and answering questions attendees may have.

Shindig Early Adopter Guest Speakers:

  • Michael AngillettaProfessor & Senior Sustainability Scholar, Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs, Arizona State University

Note: Watch the brief tutorial video, Canvas for Shindig

The Shindig Canvas plugin is available for free on a public GitHub Repo. Once the plugin is installed in the university’s LMS, IT administrators can contact Shindig for an API key to enable the creation of on-demand Shindig sessions in Canvas. The company is offering each Canvas client institution 10 free Shindig sessions of up to 1,000 attendees.
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First-time users: upon entering the room, click “Allow” to the Flash prompt requesting access to your webcam. (Chrome users may need to click Allow a second time).

Note: The Shindig app currently only supports interacting with the featured speakers through text. To fully enjoy the Shindig experience and be enabled to ask video chat questions of the speaker or video chat privately with other participants, please log in from a computer with webcam and microphone capabilities.

blended and online learning

How much Online Content in Blended Learning?

http://www.hotlunchtray.com/much-online-content-blended-learning/

In 2007 The Sloan Consortium ( presently the Online Learning Consortium) asserted that when 30-79% of class content is available online that is a blended learning class.

"content

entire report here: http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/blending-in.pdf

Choice within Online Content

Another often referenced definer of Blended Learning is The Christensen Institute.  Student control of Time, Place, and Path are important in this definition.

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more on blended learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+learning

more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online

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synchronous online learning

Most Faculty Tackle Synchronous Online Instruction Ill-Prepared

By Dian Schaffhauser 09/22/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/22/most-faculty-tackle-synchronous-online-instruction-ill-prepared.aspx

a new report from the Online Learning Consortium, a non-profit professional organization that aims to help educators integrate best practices into their online instruction. The OLC researchers involved in developing “What Can We Learn From Our Colleagues? A Framework for Virtual Classroom Training” solicited online responses from 733 people with “substantial” experience in teaching and “significant” experience in online.

Among the instructors who had taught using a synchronous classroom, two thirds (66 percent) had received training specifically on how to do that. A quarter (27 percent) received a month or more of training; a third (32 percent) received less than a day. A remarkable 55 percent took their training before going into a virtual classroom.

Half of the respondents were primarily self-taught; only 24 percent received formal training; and the remaining 26 percent did their learning through informal conversations with peers who teach synchronously. The training included lots of reading, video tutorials and listening to lectures — in other words, as the report’s authors noted, “sage on the stage” activities that are “antithetical to effective virtual classroom pedagogy.” Forty-one percent of people said synchronous activities “played little or no role in their virtual classroom training”; only 30 percent found that synchronous activities did play a substantial role.

What didn’t exist in training for almost four in five respondents were any of the following:

  • “Shadowing” of an experienced online instructor;
  • Teaching or co-teaching in a classroom being monitored by a trainer or experienced online instructor; or
  • Reviewing recordings of their own performances in a virtual classroom.

Also helpful, the survey found:

  • Peer coaching from colleagues;
  • Reviewing recordings of the instructor’s performance; and
  • Consulting with an instructional designer.

my note: another glaring proof that faculty IS needed in the process.

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more on synchronous online instruction in this IMS blog

online learning lingo

Proportion of Content

Delivered Online

Type of Course

Typical Description

0%

Traditional

Classroom-based teaching with assignments and activities which students pursue independently of each other.

1 to 29%

Web Facilitated

Web resources and technologies are used to facilitate what is essentially a face-to-face course. May use webpages and course management systems (CMS) to post syllabuses, readings and assignments.

30-79%

Blended / Hybrid

Course blends online and face-to-face delivery. Substantial parts of the content are delivered online and discussions, team projects and activities and web safaris are used for learning. The number of face-to-face sessions is decreased as the volume of online activity increases.

80+%

Online

A course where all, or almost all, of the content is delivered online with no or a very small number of face-to-face meetings.
  • Synchronous learning
  • Asynchronous learning

Flipped Classroom

Competency-Based Learning

open learning
Flexible learning (badges)

Gamification

Immersive Learning Environments

Adaptive Learning and Assessment

Systems
Simulation
Immersive Tutoring

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Glossary of Online Learning Terms http://theelearningcoach.com/resources/online-learning-glossary-of-terms/

E-Learning Terms
http://www.bpcc.edu/educationaltechnology/glossary.html

online learning and course design

Online learning can work if universities just rethink the design of their courses

https://theconversation.com/online-learning-can-work-if-universities-just-rethink-the-design-of-their-courses-50848

Course design is key to improving student engagement

Training teachers in how to design their courses is key to re-engaging individual students and holding back the tide of dropouts.

Five tips for designing an online course:

  1. State your objective: Each lesson should have one concise, action-oriented learning objective to ensure your lesson design process is focused.
  2. Think as a private tutor: Learners today are inundated with media tailored to them and they expect learning to be tailored as well. So think about how the tools available, including new technologies, will help create meaningful learning moments for all your students.
  3. Storyboard before you build: Being able to see a complete lesson, especially one that integrates various mediums, is essential to creating a successful learning experience.
  4. Build towards high-order thinking: Technology in education can go beyond multiple-choice questions and document repositories. Don’t be afraid to integrate tools that let learners create and share.
  5. Remember you’re learning too: Reviewing learner results from a lesson shouldn’t just be about their score, but also evaluating how effectively the lesson was developed and executed so your teaching can adapt and learn as well.

Face-to-Face vs. Online Learning

Face-to-Face vs. Online Learning: Why Is It Either/Or?

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/face-to-face-vs-online-why-either-or-matt-levinson

Too often, adults assume the worst about kids’ online behavior instead of seeing the best. The facts are that teens know how to build community online — and they’re already doing it. A recent Pew survey of teens and online behavior (as reported by The New York Times) revealed:

57 percent of American teenagers age 13 to 17 say they have made a friend online. Nearly three in 10 of the teenagers surveyed said they had a network of more than five friends they had made through the internet. The vast majority, 77 percent, of these relationships don’t culminate in an actual meeting.

7 Stages of Development

There’s a clear path to online learning, matched with strong face-to-face interactions. Schools should be nimble enough to incorporate both modes of learning. And what does the path to successful digital learning look like? Here are the stages of development:
1. Clean up infrastructure.

2. Go 1:1.

3. Find the right LMS.

4. Consider ergonomics and surfaces.

5. Embrace teamwork and collaboration.

6. Communicate with and educate the parent community.

7. Find the right consortium for online learning.

The “Why” of Technology Adoption

Online Learning Effective

Online Learning is Just as Effective as Traditional Education, According to a New MIT Study

http://bostinno.streetwise.co/2014/09/24/mit-study-how-do-online-courses-compare-to-traditional-learning/

MIT recently released its final report on what the school’s future will look like, education-wise.

As with any disruptive technology, MOOCs have been viewed with enthusiasm in many quarters and skepticism in some. However, the underlying facts are inarguable: that the rising cost of education, combined with the transformative potential of online teaching and learning technologies, presents a long-term challenge that no university can afford to ignore.

Online Learning: MOOC – resources and ideas

http://chronicle.com/section/Online-Learning/623/

A MOOC Platform Based on Engagement:
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2013/11/06/a-mooc-platform-based-on-engagement.aspx

COLLEGE UNBOUND: THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR STUDENTS

Posted on November 5, 2013 by 
http://www.knewton.com/blog/knewton/education-technology/2013/11/05/college-unbound/

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