Searching for "online learning"

digital badges in education

Digital Badges in Education: Trends, Issues, and Cases.

https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138857605

In recent years, digital badging systems have become a credible means through which learners can establish portfolios and articulate knowledge and skills for both academic and professional settings. Digital Badges in Education provides the first comprehensive overview of this emerging tool. A digital badge is an online-based visual representation that uses detailed metadata to signify learners’ specific achievements and credentials in a variety of subjects across K-12 classrooms, higher education, and workplace learning. Focusing on learning design, assessment, and concrete cases in various contexts, this book explores the necessary components of badging systems, their functions and value, and the possible problems they face. These twenty-five chapters illustrate a range of successful applications of digital badges to address a broad spectrum of learning challenges and to help readers formulate solutions during the development of their digital badges learning projects.

digital badges

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Badges and Leaderboards: Professional Developments for Teachers in K12

digital badges

http://www.shakeuplearning.com/blog/more-ideas-for-badges-in-professional-learning/

Why should I bother earning badges?

http://www.connectededucators.org/cem-digital-badges-faq/

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Canvas Badges:

https://canvas.instructure.com/courses/904071

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Edmodo Badges:

http://www.helloliteracy.com/2012/09/technologically-speaking-currently.html

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issues to consider:

digital badges: issues to consider

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More on badges and gaming in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges&submit=Search

wifi for digital education

High Performance Wi-Fi For Today’s Digital Education

Seamless and robust mobile connectivity is a must have in today’s education environment. More student mobile devices, higher performance data rates, greater capacity demands, increasing on-line curriculum and testing require enterprise grade Wi-Fi reliability without the complexities and on-going maintenance. It has to be simple and it has to just work.

In this webinar, you will hear case studies from three different schools, each with their own specific wireless needs, how they addressed them and what recommendation they would each have to ensure your wireless project goes smoothly.

Thank you for registering for High Performance Wi-Fi For Today’s Digital Education. Save this email for details on the webcast.

LIVE WEBCAST DATE:  April 07, 2016
LIVE WEBCAST TIME:  02:00 PM EDT

Use the link below to enter the webcast up to 15 minutes before the start.

WEBCAST LINK:  http://event.on24.com/wcc/r/1160276/320EAD217540BD94C9056C12601219C3

Vinson Houston
Vice President for Information Technology, Jacksonville State University

Since 2008, Mr. Vinson Houston has served as vice president for information technology at Jacksonville State University.  Prior to that, Mr. Houston served as Director of Telecommunications for JSU, beginning in 2005. Mr. Houston currently serves on the board of directors for the Alabama Supercomputer Authority and is on the CORE Executive Committee that leads initiatives promoting PK-20 collaboration related to using new technologies in the classroom.  He holds a B.A. and an M.B.A. from Jacksonville State University.

 

Kris Keckler
Executive Director of Information and Accountability, KUSD

Kenosha Unified School District (KUSD) is the 3rd largest district in Wisconsin, with over 40 schools.  KUSD’s mission is to provide excellent, challenging learning opportunities and experiences that prepare each student for success. From this role, Kris has the pleasure of directly guiding both the Office of Educational Accountability and the Information Services Department.  Kris is a strong advocate for promoting quality integration of technology and data for staff and students alike.

Angela Becker
Network Manager, KUSD

 

Angela Becker is the Network Manager for Kenosha Unified School District.  KUSD serves over 22,200 students and 3,000 staff.  Angela supports and maintains the network and wireless infrastructure for 40 district sites which includes a 10Gb internal fiber ring, over 950 access points and 700 network switches as well as provides application and online testing support for the district.

 

Alex Ender
Network and Systems Administrator, Everest Academy

 

As the Network and Systems Administrator at Everest Academy, Alex is responsible for planning and implementing network and server upgrades. He has worked both as an administrator and technician for the past 4 years. Never one for a dull moment, Alex also monitors and maintains multiple client networks as a consultant.

 

 

 

quizzes for practice and training

Five Types of Quizzes That Deepen Engagement with Course Content

By:

Tropman, E., (2014). In defense of reading quizzes. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 26 (1), 140-146.

Brame, C. J. and Biel, R., (2015). Test-enhanced learning: The potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses. Cell Biology Education—Life Sciences Education, 14 (Summer), 1-12.

Collaborative quizzing
Quizzing with resources
Quizzing after questioning
Online quizzes completed before class

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Top Five Tips for Creating Training Quizzes

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More on the use of quizzes as a conversation starter and/or training tool (versus assessment tool) in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2012/11/28/quizzes-and-fun-games-gamification/

universal design

Universal Design for Libraries and Librarians

Instructors: Jessica Olin, Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College; and Holly Mabry, Digital Services Librarian, Gardner-Webb University

Offered: April 11 – May 27, 2016
A Moodle based web course with asynchronous weekly content lessons, tutorials, assignments, and groups discussion.

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Universal Design is the idea of designing products, places, and experiences to make them accessible to as broad a spectrum of people as possible, without requiring special modifications or adaptations. This course will present an overview of universal design as a historical movement, as a philosophy, and as an applicable set of tools. Students will learn about the diversity of experiences and capabilities that people have, including disabilities (e.g. physical, learning, cognitive, resulting from age and/or accident), cultural backgrounds, and other abilities. The class will also give students the opportunity to redesign specific products or environments to make them more universally accessible and usable.

Takeaways
By the end of this class, students will be able to…

  • Articulate the ethical, philosophical, and practical aspects of Universal Design as a method and movement – both in general and as it relates to their specific work and life circumstances
  • Demonstrate the specific pedagogical, ethical, and customer service benefits of using Universal Design principles to develop and recreate library spaces and services in order to make them more broadly accessible
  • Integrate the ideals and practicalities of Universal Design into library spaces and services via a continuous critique and evaluation cycle

 

Here’s the Course Page

Jessica Olin is the Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College. Ms. Olin received her MLIS from Simmons College in 2003 and an MAEd, with a concentration in Adult Education, from Touro University International. Her first position in higher education was at Landmark College, a college that is specifically geared to meeting the unique needs of people with learning differences. While at Landmark, Ms. Olin learned about the ethical, theoretical, and practical aspects of universal design. She has since taught an undergraduate course for both the education and the entrepreneurship departments at Hiram College on the subject.

Holly Mabry received her MLIS from UNC-Greensboro in 2009. She is currently the Digital Services Librarian at Gardner-Webb University where she manages the university’s institutional repository, and teaches the library’s for-credit online research skills course. She also works for an international virtual reference service called Chatstaff. Since finishing her MLIS, she has done several presentations at local and national library conferences on implementing universal design in libraries with a focus on accessibility for patrons with disabilities.

Dates:

February 29 – March 31, 2016

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

 

Technical Requirements:

Moodle login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date. The Moodle-developed course site will include weekly new content lessons and is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructor. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. The course web site will be open for 1 week prior to the start date for students to have access to Moodle instructions and set their browser correctly. The course site will remain open for 90 days after the end date for students to refer back to course material.

Registration Information:

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

games and badges in education

U Massachusetts Launches its First Online Badge Program

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/03/17/u-massachusetts-launches-its-first-online-badge-program.aspx

By Joshua Bolkan, 03/17/16

The University of Massachusetts’ online consortium, UMassOnline, has launched its first non-credit badge program.

Teaching with Call of Duty, World of Warcraft Subject of New Penn State Course

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/03/18/teaching-with-call-of-duty-world-of-warcraft-subject-of-new-penn-state-course.aspx

By Dian Schaffhauser, 03/18/16

Gaming 2 Learn,” part of Learning Design & Tech, is being offered online to current and future educators through the university’s World Campus. Instructor Ali Carr-Chellman, who once published an article on the Huffington Post titled, “We Need More Games in Schools,”

Students who participate in the course will do a project in which they pick a commercial game and describe how it integrates with their chosen content area. They also need to watch kids play their favorite games and play alongside them, then reflect on those experiences.

More on gaming in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming&submit=Search

more on badges in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges&submit=Search

digital humanities for librarians

Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: April 4-29, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/112-digital-humanities.php

Digital humanities (DH) has been heralded as the next big thing in humanities scholarship and universities have been creating initiatives and new positions in this field. Libraries, too, have moved to create a presence in the digital humanities community, setting up centers and hiring librarians to staff them. This course is designed as an introduction for librarians or library school students who have little or no exposure to DH and wish to be better positioned to offer DH support or services in a library setting. Participants will read and discuss DH scholarship, learn about frequently-used software, and think about why and how libraries and librarians engage DH. While I will encourage participants to explore more complex computing approaches (and I will support those who do as best I can), this course does not presuppose computing skills such as programming or use of the command line and will not ask participants to do much more than upload files to websites or install and use simple programs. Participants should have an interest and background in humanities scholarship and humanities librarianship and while the readings will focus on activities in the United States, our discussions can be more geographically wide-ranging.

Objectives:

– A basic knowledge of what digital humanities is and how it effects scholarship in the humanities disciplines.

– Exposure to core tools and approaches used by digital humanists.

– An understanding of how libraries and librarians have been involved with digital humanities.

– Critical engagement with the role of librarians and libraries in digital humanities.

This class has a follow-up, Introduction to Text Encoding

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/133-text-encoding.php

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.”

Read an interview with John Russell about this class:

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=769

You can register in this course through the first week of instruction (as long as it is not full). The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants us to send a billing statement or wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us by email to make arrangements: inquiries@libraryjuiceacademy.com

Introduction to Text Encoding

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: May 2-27, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

This course will introduce students to text encoding according to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. Why should you care about text encoding or the TEI Guidelines? The creation of digital scholarly texts is a core part of the digital humanities and many digital humanities grants and publications require encoding texts in accordance with the TEI Guidelines. Students in this course will learn about the use-cases for text encoding and get a basic introduction to the principles of scholarly editing before moving on to learning some XML basics and creating a small-scale TEI project using the XML editor oXygen. We will not cover (beyond the very basics) processing TEI, and students interested in learning about XSLT and/or XQuery should turn to the LJA courses offered on those subjects. Participants should have some experience with digital humanities, as this course is intended as a follow up to the Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians course.

Objectives:

  • A basic understanding of digital scholarly editing as an academic activity.
  • Knowledge of standard TEI elements for encoding poetry and prose.
  • Some engagement with more complex encoding practices, such as working with manuscripts.
  • An understanding of how librarians have participated in text encoding.
  • Deeper engagement with digital humanities practices.

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.” Interview with John Russell

Course Structure

This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional synchronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

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Spatial Data Analyst & Curator

University Libraries / U-Spatial

University of Minnesota

 

Overview

The University of Minnesota Libraries and U-Spatial (https://uspatial.umn.edu/) seek a knowledgeable and proactive Spatial Data Analyst & Curator to advance the Libraries’ efforts in the areas of geospatial projects, geospatial data curation and management, and digital spatial humanities. Residing in the John R. Borchert Map Library, the Spatial Data Analyst & Curator works under the management and direction of the University Libraries, which holds institutional responsibility for supporting the products and processes of scholarship through the collection, provisioning, and preservation of information resources in all formats and media. As such, the work of the Spatial Data Analyst & Curator uses a life-cycle data management approach to serve the specific needs of the spatial data creator/user community while ensuring that processes and methods employed are strongly aligned with enterprise strategies and systems.

Required Qualifications include a Master’s degree in library/information science from an American Library Association accredited library school, GIS-related field, or equivalent combination of advanced degree and relevant experience, as well as experience with geographical information systems, including/especially Esri’s ArcGIS software, experience with scripting languages, such as Python or JavaScript, and experience with metadata creation, schema, and management.

 

For complete description, qualifications and to apply, go to: http://z.umn.edu/ulib362

 

The University of Minnesota is an Equal Opportunity Educator and Employer.

 

 

Ryan Mattke

Head, John R. Borchert Map Library

University of Minnesota
S-76 Wilson Library

309 19th Ave South

Minneapolis, MN 55455

Email: matt0089@umn.edu

Web: http://www.lib.umn.edu/borchert

Phone: 612.624.5757
ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8816-9289

flipped classroom resources

More on flipped classroom in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=flipped&submit=Search

what is it?

  • The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed.
EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative 7 Things You Should Know About Flipped Classrooms – eli7081.pdf. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eli7081.pdf
  • Flipped classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional educational arrangement by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom.

Flipped classroom. (2016, March 22). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Flipped_classroom&oldid=711368580

  • In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates.
Flipping the Classroom | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/flipping-the-classroom/

flipped classroom

 

flipped classroom

flipped classroom

The Flipped Class: Overcoming Common Hurdles by Edutopia:
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-learning-toolkit-common-hurdles-jon-bergmann

platforms like Blackboard and Canvas are playing a bigger role in the flipped learning environment. Other viable options include Google’s Classroom, which “automates” the sharing process but isn’t necessarily an organizational tool.
McCrea, B. (2016). 6 Flipped Learning Technologies To Watch in 2016. THE Journal. Retrieved from https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/03/16/6-flipped-learning-technologies-to-watch-in-2016.aspx

Pros:

  • Helps kids who were absent, stay current.

  • Helps kids who don’t get the lesson the first time in class.

  • Good resource for teacher assistants or student support staff who may not know the curriculum or may not know what to focus on.

  • Can attach Google spreadsheets or other online quizzes to check for comprehension, along with the video link sent to students

Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/pros-and-cons-flipped-classroom
  • Students have more control
  • It promotes student-centered learning and collaboration
  • Access = easier for parents to see what’s going on
  • It can be more efficient
Acedo, M. (2013, November 27). 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
an example of a positive take:
  • Myth #1 – Proponents of the Flipped Classroom Methodology Dislike Lectures
  • Myth #2 – Flipping Your Class Means Getting Rid of Lecturing
  • Myth #3 – Flipping Your Class Will Mean That Students Will Stop Coming to Class
  • Myth #4 – Flipping Your Class Will Require Lots of Technical Knowledge
  • Myth #5 – Flipping Your Class Will Require Huge Amounts of Time
  • Myth #6 – Students Will Not Like the Flipped Class, and Your Teaching Evaluations Will Suffer
Kim, J. (n.d.). 6 Myths of the Flipped Classroom | Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved March 23, 2016, from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/6-myths-flipped-classroom

Cons:

  • I have a long way to go in my skill set in making the videos interesting (they, to me anyway, are really boring to watch).
  • I’m not sure how much they (the videos) are being utilized. There are just certain items that are learned better through direct one on one contact.
  • I know as I’m teaching, I get direct feedback from my students by looking at their faces and gauging comprehension. I, as a teacher, don’t get that feedback as I’m designing and creating my videos.”
Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom. (n.d.). Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://www.teachhub.com/pros-and-cons-flipped-classroom
  • It can create or exacerbate a digital divide
  • It relies on preparation and trust
  • Not naturally a test-prep form of learning
  • Time in front of screens–instead of people and places–is increased
Acedo, M. (2013, November 27). 10 Pros And Cons Of A Flipped Classroom. Retrieved from http://www.teachthought.com/learning/blended-flipped-learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/
an example of negative take:
  • I dislike the idea of giving my students homework.
  • A lecture by video is still a lecture.
  • I want my students to own their learning.
  • My students need to be able to find and critically evaluate their own resources
Wright, S. (2012, October 8). The Flip: End of a Love Affair. Retrieved March 23, 2016, from http://plpnetwork.com/2012/10/08/flip-love-affair/

Research:

Zuber, W. J. (2016). The flipped classroom, a review of the literature. Industrial & Commercial Training, 48(2), 97-103. doi:10.1108/ICT-05-2015-0039 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/ICT-05-2015-0039

although learning styletheories serve as a justification for different learning activities it does not provide the necessarytheoretical framework as to how the activities need to be structured (Bishop and Verleger, 2013). p. 99

One observation from the literature is there is a lack of consistency of models of the FCM (Davieset al.,2013, p. 565) in addition to a lack of research into student performance, (Findlay-Thompson andMombourquette, 2014, p. 65; Euniceet al., 2013) broader impacts on taking up too much of thestudents’time and studies of broader student demographics. In another literature review of the FCM,Bishop and Verleger concur with the observation that there is a lack of consensus as to the definitionof the method and the theoretical frameworks (Bishop and Verleger, 2013). p. 99

The FCM isheavily reliant on technology and this is an important consideration for all who consideremploying the FCM. p. 101

Flipped Classrooms’ may not have any impact on learning:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/23/flipped-classrooms-may-not-have-any-impact-on-learning/

Gross, B., Marinari, M., Hoffman, M., DeSimone, K., & Burke, P. (2015). Flipped @ SBU: Student Satisfaction and the College Classroom. Educational Research Quarterly, 39(2), 36-52.
we found that high levels of student engagement and course satisfaction characterised the students in the flipped courses, without any observable reduction in academic performance.

Hotle, S. L., & Garrow, L. A. (2016). Effects of the Traditional and Flipped Classrooms on Undergraduate Student Opinions and Success. Journal Of Professional Issues In Engineering Education & Practice, 142(1), 1-11. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)EI.1943-5541.0000259
It was found that student performance on quizzes was not significantly different across the traditional and flipped classrooms. A key shortcoming noted with the flipped classroom was students’ inability to ask questions during lectures. Students in flipped classrooms were more likely to attend office hours compared to traditional classroom students, but the difference was not statistically significant.

Heyborne, W. H., & Perrett, J. J. (2016). To Flip or Not to Flip? Analysis of a Flipped Classroom Pedagogy in a General Biology Course. Journal Of College Science Teaching, 45(4), 31-37.
Although the outcomes were mixed, regarding the superiority of either pedagogical approach, there does seem to be a trend toward performance gains using the flipped pedagogy. We strongly advocate for a larger multiclass study to further clarify this important pedagogical question.

Tomory, A., & Watson, S. (2015). Flipped Classrooms for Advanced Science Courses. Journal Of Science Education & Technology, 24(6), 875-887. doi:10.1007/s10956-015-9570-8

 

universal design

Universal Design for Libraries and Librarians

Instructors: Jessica Olin, Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College; and Holly Mabry, Digital Services Librarian, Gardner-Webb University.
Starting Monday, April 11, 2016, running for 6 weeks
Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Universal Design is the idea of designing products, places, and experiences to make them accessible to as broad a spectrum of people as possible, without requiring special modifications or adaptations. This course will present an overview of universal design as a historical movement, as a philosophy, and as an applicable set of tools. Students will learn about the diversity of experiences and capabilities that people have, including disabilities (e.g. physical, learning, cognitive, resulting from age and/or accident), cultural backgrounds, and other abilities. The class will also give students the opportunity to redesign specific products or environments to make them more universally accessible and usable. By the end of this class, students will be able to…

  • Articulate the ethical, philosophical, and practical aspects of Universal Design as a method and movement – both in general and as it relates to their specific work and life circumstances
  • Demonstrate the specific pedagogical, ethical, and customer service benefits of using Universal Design principles to develop and recreate library spaces and services in order to make them more broadly accessible
  • Integrate the ideals and practicalities of Universal Design into library spaces and services via a continuous critique and evaluation cycle

Details here and Registration here.

competency-based education

TCC 2016 cordially invites you to join a FREE special pre-conference webinar on competency-based education (CBE).

Unpack CBE
During this session, Diane Singer from Bandman University, and Susan Manning from the University of Wisconsin at Stout, discuss the meaning and processes behind CBE, with a specific eye to how the assessment and recognition of competencies benefit various stakeholders, including business and industry.

Date & time:

March 16, 2:00 PM Hawaii; 6:00 PM Mountain; 8:00 PM Eastern

March 17, 9:00 AM Tokyo & Seoul; 11:00 AM Sydney, Feb. 26

 

Other timezones:

http://bit.ly/tcc16precon2-unpackCBE

 

Full information:

http://2016.tcconlineconference.org/unpacking-cbe/

RSVP for this FREE session!

If you wish to participate, please RSVP. A reminder will be sent a few days prior along with instructions to sign-in.

http://bit.ly/tcc2016precon2-rsvp

The 21st Annual TCC Worldwide Online Conference: April 19-21, 2016
TCC, Technology, Colleges and Community, is a worldwide online conference attended by university and college personnel including faculty, academic support staff, counselors, student services personnel, students, and administrators.

More on competency-based learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=competency+based+learning&submit=Search

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webinar archived recording:

http://2016.tcconlineconference.org/make-the-future/

Make the Future! Create a Virtual Makerspace

Join us as we explore hosting a virtual makerspace. During this session, we explain and discuss makerspaces and how to leverage the maker movement in online education.Do you have an activity, project, creation or game that you’d like to share? Show your ideas and creations by sharing your links, favorite tools, and wonderful stories.

Recorded on February 25, 2016

Presenter

Dr. Cynthia Calongne
CTU Doctoral Program | ccalongne@ctuonline.edu
Twitter and Skype: @lyrlobo

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