Searching for "plagiarism"

topics for IM260

proposed topics for IM 260 class

  • Media literacy. Differentiated instruction. Media literacy guide.
    Fake news as part of media literacy. Visual literacy as part of media literacy. Media literacy as part of digital citizenship.
  • Web design / web development
    the roles of HTML5, CSS, Java Script, PHP, Bootstrap, JQuery, React and other scripting languages and libraries. Heat maps and other usability issues; website content strategy. THE MODEL-VIEW-CONTROLLER (MVC) design pattern
  • Social media for institutional use. Digital Curation. Social Media algorithms. Etiquette Ethics. Mastodon
    I hosted a LITA webinar in the fall of 2016 (four weeks); I can accommodate any information from that webinar for the use of the IM students
  • OER and instructional designer’s assistance to book creators.
    I can cover both the “library part” (“free” OER, copyright issues etc) and the support / creative part of an OER book / textbook
  • Big Data.” Data visualization. Large scale visualization. Text encoding. Analytics, Data mining. Unizin. Python, R in academia.
    I can introduce the students to the large idea of Big Data and its importance in lieu of the upcoming IoT, but also departmentalize its importance for academia, business, etc. From infographics to heavy duty visualization (Primo X-Services API. JSON, Flask).
  • NetNeutrality, Digital Darwinism, Internet economy and the role of your professional in such environment
    I can introduce students to the issues, if not familiar and / or lead a discussion on a rather controversial topic
  • Digital assessment. Digital Assessment literacy.
    I can introduce students to tools, how to evaluate and select tools and their pedagogical implications
  • Wikipedia
    a hands-on exercise on working with Wikipedia. After the session, students will be able to create Wikipedia entries thus knowing intimately the process of Wikipedia and its information.
  • Effective presentations. Tools, methods, concepts and theories (cognitive load). Presentations in the era of VR, AR and mixed reality. Unity.
    I can facilitate a discussion among experts (your students) on selection of tools and their didactically sound use to convey information. I can supplement the discussion with my own findings and conclusions.
  • eConferencing. Tools and methods
    I can facilitate a discussion among your students on selection of tools and comparison. Discussion about the their future and their place in an increasing online learning environment
  • Digital Storytelling. Immersive Storytelling. The Moth. Twine. Transmedia Storytelling
    I am teaching a LIB 490/590 Digital Storytelling class. I can adapt any information from that class to the use of IM students
  • VR, AR, Mixed Reality.
    besides Mark Gill, I can facilitate a discussion, which goes beyond hardware and brands, but expand on the implications for academia and corporate education / world
  • IoT , Arduino, Raspberry PI. Industry 4.0
  • Instructional design. ID2ID
    I can facilitate a discussion based on the Educause suggestions about the profession’s development
  • Microcredentialing in academia and corporate world. Blockchain
  • IT in K12. How to evaluate; prioritize; select. obsolete trends in 21 century schools. K12 mobile learning
  • Podcasting: past, present, future. Beautiful Audio Editor.
    a definition of podcasting and delineation of similar activities; advantages and disadvantages.
  • Digital, Blended (Hybrid), Online teaching and learning: facilitation. Methods and techniques. Proctoring. Online students’ expectations. Faculty support. Asynch. Blended Synchronous Learning Environment
  • Gender, race and age in education. Digital divide. Xennials, Millennials and Gen Z. generational approach to teaching and learning. Young vs old Millennials. Millennial employees.
  • Privacy, [cyber]security, surveillance. K12 cyberincidents. Hackers.
  • Gaming and gamification. Appsmashing. Gradecraft
  • Lecture capture, course capture.
  • Bibliometrics, altmetrics
  • Technology and cheating, academic dishonest, plagiarism, copyright.

intellectual property

When:  October 24, 2017    2:00-3:00pm
Where: Adobe Connect meeting:  https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/oercommunityconversations

Who: Karen Pikula, Psychology faculty, Central Lakes College, and Minnesota State OER Faculty Development Coordinator

Special Guest: Gary Hunter System Director for Intellectual Property

Questions?  

Feel free to contact Kimberly Johnson, Director of Faculty and Instructional Development at kimberly.johnson@minnstate.edu or Karen Pikula, Minnesota State OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at karen.pikula@minnstate.edu.

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notes from the webinar

Gary Hunter. copyright. movies, public performance rights, youtube videos. up

the compliance of the terms of service of the web site. Contract law. copyright law. system procedure – copyright clearance, clearing the copyright means using it without violating the copyright law.

clearing copyright:

  • determine if materials are or are not protected
  • use your own original materials
  • perform fair use analysis with fair use checklist to usitify use
  • use in compliance with sections 110 (1) & (2) of copyright act
  • use materials avaialble through an open or CC license
  • get permission (letter, email, subscription, license, etc.)

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html 

8 categories of copyright works

establishing copyright. eligibility requirements;

  • fixation
  • originality
  • minimal creativity

when these three criteria met, copyright arises automatically.

registering a copyright https://www.copyright.gov/ . $35. 70 years for individuals and 95 for corporations or 210 years

not protected by copyright

  • public domain (expired copyright/donated)
  • federal gov publications and web site info
  • works typically registered as a trademark
    • tag lines and slogans
      • just do it – nike 1988
      • got milk – 1993
  • math equations and formulas
  • recipes
  • blank forms
  • phone books

copyright holder exclusive rights

  1. make copies of the work
  2. prepare derivative works
  3. distribute copies
  4. perform the work – performing live (band concert); pre-record audio visual of the same items. DVD play of a movie is considered “performing”
  5. display the work

legality vs reality

legality – activity may be copyright infringement from a legal point of view.

reality – tolerated or ignored by the copyright holder for various reasons

limitations on copyright

  • fair use (#107). librarians use it a lot to copy. using copyright works in F2F teaching, scholarship, research and other non-profit ed purposes.
    1. criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, research

four factors to consider (not educational exception) ; it is a four part test to apply: 1. purpose and character if tge yse 2. nature of the copyirghted work (e.g. factual v creative) 3. amount
http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Fair_Use_Checklist1.pdf

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

fair use >> . transformation: 1. add / subtract from original 2. use for different purpose; >> parody songs – using enough of music and words to recognize the song, but not enough to it to be copyright infrigement. memes.

students’ use of copyrighted works. students may: use the entire copyrighted work but not publish openly

copyright act #110 (1) applies to F2F teaching.

copyright act #110 (2) applies to Hybrid/Online teaching. exception one digital copy can made and uploaded on D2L. reasonable and limited portions of dramatic musical or audiovisual works

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

personal use v public performance.

if people identifiable ask them to sign a media release form

plagiarism v copyright infringement.

Creative Commons (CC). search engine for content available through cc licenses. https://creativecommons.org/ CC BY – attribution needed; CC BY-SA may remix, tweak CC BY-ND can redistribute, but not alter CC BY-NC for non profit. CC BY-NC-SA

copyright questions

book chapters: one is a rule of thumb
PDF versions of the eassays textbook acceptable, if the students purchased it

music performance licenses: usually cover – educational activities on campus; ed activities at off-campus locations that are outreach

music licenses: BMI, ASCAP, SESAC

#201. Ownership of Copyright. Student ownership http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html

MnSCU board policy 3.26 intellectual policy. part 4, subpart A: institutional works; scholarly works; personal works; student works. MnSCU board policy 3.27.1: copyright clearance.

Gary.Hunter@so.mnscu.edu

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more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=oer

Embedded Librarianship in Online Courses

Embedded Librarianship in Online Courses

Instructor: Mimi O’Malley Dates: October 2nd to 27th, 2017

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/081-embedded-online.php

Learning outcomes:

  • Discuss ways to incorporate library services through the learning management system level.
  • Examine bibliographic instruction in the virtual classroom through team teaching, guest lecturing.
  • Identify librarian roles during the design and development of online courses.
  • Assessing embedded librarianship efforts.

Mimi O’Malley is the learning technology translation strategist at Spalding University. She helps faculty prepare course content for hybrid and fully online courses in addition to incorporating open education resources into courses. She previously wrote and facilitated professional development courses and workshops at the Learning House, Inc. Mimi has presented workshops on online learning topics including assessment, plagiarism, copyright, and curriculum trends at the Learning House, Inc. CONNECT Users Conference, SLOAN-C ALN, Pencils and Pixels and New Horizons Teaching & Learning Conference. Interview with Mimi O’Malley

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more on embedded librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=embedded+librarian

OER workday librarians

Librarians OER Workday

SCSU ad hoc team on open books from Spring 2015

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/04/06/e-textbook-ad-hoc-team/

Gary Hunter
Creating OER Texbooks using copyright and CC licensed materials.

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/index.html

http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/ip/index.html

What can be put on the OER textbooks:

D2L upload: every time, it is called “distribution.”

plays, music, prerecorded files such as DVD, music CD.

sculpture or painting on a Web site,

five rights avoid violating. System procedure 3.27.1 copyright clearance

 

Copyright and OER, GRIT May2017 from Esko Lius

DMCA Digital Millennium Copyright Act

there are certain works which are not protected

Dmc aexemptions2010 from dixieyeager

The difference between Plagiarism and copyright infringement

CI is a violation of a federal law. Plagiarism can turn into CI.

creative commons

Creative Commons License Basics 2010 from Sue Gallaway

NC – no competitor can take our work and use it against us.

faculty can use anything in F2F, which is lawfully obtained. Flickr, photo without violating the regulations, it can be used in a PPT, but only on a F2F classroom. In OER, it needs to be revised.

Gary can share a “media release” form (slid 17).

Open Textbook Institute (Kimberly Johnson)

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Shane Nackerud and Matthew Lee
use of Pressbooks (it is open source). Minitex pays a vendor to host it, but it can be hosted locally, because it is open source

https://mlpp.pressbooks.pub/
Minnesota Library Publishing Project – partner ship between Minitex and public libraries.

authoring tool. Platform to edit and publish.

Building an Ebook Platform from Scratch: Are You Daft?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/07/library-technology-conference-2017/ 

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Alex Kent, Digital Initiative Librarian

Islandora

Islandora Overview: PASIG May 2013 from Mark Leggott

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OER stakeholders and critical contacts on your campus: CETL, TLTR

Preparation: as per link above, the libraray (former LRS) met in the spring of 2015

what is the role of the library staff in the OER movement. promote what already exists. Open textbook group https://www.cccoer.org/

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Stephen Kelly, OER Project Grants Manager

https://www.opened.com/

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more on OER in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=open+source

global education teaching learning conference

International Academic Conference on Global Education, Teaching and Learning in Vienna, Austria 2017 (IAC-GETL in Vienna 2017)

https://www.conferences-scientific.cz/inpage/conference-vienna-iacgetl-2017/

Conference Program Dates

Friday – Saturday, November 24 – 25, 2017

Venue Hotel – Fourside Hotel City Center Vienna
Grieshofgasse 11, A – 1120 Wien / Vienna, AUSTRIA

About the Conference

International Academic Conference in Vienna 2017 is an important international gathering of scholars, educators and PhD students. IAC-GETL 2017 in Vienna will take place in conference facilities located in Vienna, the touristic, business and historic center of Austria.

Conference language: English language

Conferences organized by the Czech Institute of Academic Education z.s. and Czech Technical University in Prague.

Conference Topics

Conference Topics – Education, Teaching, Learning and E-learning

Education, Teaching and Learning

Distance Education, Higher Education, Effective Teaching Pedagogies, Learning Styles and Learning Outcomes, Emerging Technologies, Educational Management, Engineering and Sciences Research, Competitive Skills, Continuing Education, Transferring Disciplines, Imaginative Education, Language Education, Geographical Education, Health Education, Home Education, Science Education, Secondary Education, Second life Educators, Social Studies Education, Special Education, Learning / Teaching Methodologies and Assessment, Assessment Software Tools, Global Issues In Education and Research, Education, Research and Globalization, Barriers to Learning (ethnicity, age, psychosocial factors, …), Women and Minorities in Science and Technology, Indigenous and Diversity Issues, Intellectual Property Rights and Plagiarism, Pedagogy, Teacher Education, Cross-disciplinary areas of Education, Educational Psychology, Education practice trends and issues, Indigenous Education, Academic Research Projects, Research on Technology in Education, Research Centres, Links between Education and Research, Erasmus and Exchange experiences in universities, Students and Teaching staff Exchange programmes

E-learning

Educational Technology, Educational Games and Software, ICT Education, E-Learning, Internet technologies, Accessibility to Disabled Users, Animation, 3D, and Web 3D Applications, Mobile Applications and Learning (M-learning), Virtual Learning Environments, Videos for Learning and Educational Multimedia, Web 2.0, Social Networking and Blogs, Wireless Applications, New Trends And Experiences, Other Areas of Education

grammarly alternatives

https://www.grammarly.com/

alternatives for proofreading, grammar and spelling checker, vocabulary uses, citation suggestions:
http://alternativeto.net/software/grammarly-grammar-checker/
http://www.tricksroad.com/2016/02/grammarly-alternatives.html
https://www.codeinwp.com/blog/grammarly-vs-jetpack-vs-ginger-vs-hemingway-for-wordpress/

LanguageTool

Hemingway Editor  

Ludwig.guru

ProWritingAid

Ginger

Grammar Checker Academic

Writefull

Editsaurus

Unicheck

Antidote

PaperRater

Proofread Bot

Slick Write

Analyze My Writing

Refly Editor

VirtualWritingTutor

Just Not Sorry — the Gmail Plug-in

SEO Tools Centre

Grammarian PRO2

WhiteSmoke

Expresso app

SpellCheckPlus

Stylewriter

Document Grader

Speckie

1Checker

Plagtracker

AfterScan

WeAllEdit

eAngel Human Online Proofreading Service

GradeProof

TextTrust

PlagiarismSearch

Gramlee.com

Compilatio.net

tinySpell

digital assessment literacy

Eyal, L. (2012). Digital Assessment Literacy — the Core Role of the Teacher in a Digital Environment. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 15(2), 37-49.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d76559253%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Common to all is a view of the level of literacy as a measure of the quality of human capital of a society or a particular area. Literacy develops in interaction with the environment (Vygotsky, 1987).

digital assessment literacy refers to the role of the teacher as an assessor in a technology-rich environment.

Learning Management Systems (LMS) benefits and limitations

Measurement allows quantitative description of a particular characterization of an individual, expressed in numbers.

the combination of assessment and measurement provides a thorough and accurate picture, based upon which practical conclusions can be drawn (Wagner, 1997). A test is a systematic process in which an aspect of student behavior is quantitatively evaluated (Suen & Parkes, 2002).

For several decades this system of assessment has been criticized for a variety of reasons, including the separation between the teaching-learning process and the evaluation process, the relatively low level of thinking required, and the quantitative reporting of results, which does not contribute to students’ progress. In the last decade, the central argument against the tests system is that their predictability is limited to the field and context in which the students are tested, and that they do not predict student problem solving ability, teamwork, good work habits and honesty.

teachers mistakenly believe that repeating lessons will improve students’ achievements.

To evaluate how well the goals were achieved, objective measurement methods are employed (Black, et al., 2004).

Eshet- Alkalai (2004) offered a detailed conceptual framework for the term ‘digital literacy’ that includes: photo-visual thinking; reproduction thinking; branching thinking; information thinking; and socio-emotional thinking.

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004). Digital literacy: A conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 13(1), 93–106.

Eshet-Alkalai, Y., & Chajut, E. (2009). Changes Over Time in Digital Literacy. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 12(6), 713-715. doi:10.1089/cpb.2008.0264

two major patterns of change over time: (a) closing the gap between younger and older participants in the tasks that emphasize profi- ciency and technical control and (b) widening the gap between younger and older participants in tasks that emphasize creativity and critical thinking. Based on the comparison with the matched control groups, we suggest that experience with technology, and not age, accounts for the observed lifelong changes in digital literacy skills

Eshet-Alkalai, Y., & Soffer, O. (2012). Guest Editorial – Navigating in the Digital Era: Digital Literacy: Socio-Cultural and Educational Aspects. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 15(2), 1.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d76559228%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

a wide range of technological, cognitive and social competences—collectively termed “Digital Literacy.” Users thus must become “digitally literate” in order to cope effectively with the complex sociological, cognitive and pedagogical challenges these technologies pose. These skills include, for example, the ability to operate computers and navigate the net effectively, to cope with large volumes of information, to evaluate the reliability of information, and to critically assess what seem to be natural (and not ideologically biased) technological tools. In a different way from the spirit of modern print, learners construct and consume knowledge in non-linear environments. They need to learn, collaborate and solve problems effectively in virtual (non face-to-face) learning environments, and to communicate effectively in technology-mediated social participation environments.

It is important to note: digital literacy, then, is not limited simply to computer and Internet operation and orientation. It also relates to a variety of epistemological and ethical issues arise due to the unique characteristics of digital technologies and that are often overlapped with trends related to the post-modern and post-structural era. These include questions regarding the authority of knowledge, intellectual property and ownership, copyright, authenticity and plagiarism. Furthermore, issues such as self-representation, virtual group dynamics, and on-line addiction also arise.

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+assessment+literacy

how often quote

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I QUOTE?

http://www.plagiarism.org/citing-sources/cite-sources/

If you think it’s important to quote something, an excellent rule of thumb is that for every line you quote, you should have at least two lines analyzing it.


How to Cite Other Sources in Your Paper

http://abacus.bates.edu/~ganderso/biology/resources/writing/HTWcitations.html

DO NOT USE DIRECT QUOTES From Published Material: In 99.99% of the cases, the information you want from a research article is an objective result or interpretation. How the author stated this information, i.e., their prose, is of little importance compared to the results or interpretations themselves. Take the information and put it into your own words; avoid paraphrasing since this can potentially lead to plagiarism.

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Purdue OWL

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/03/

Writing direct quotations

  • Quote no more material than is necessary; if a short phrase from a source will suffice, don’t quote an entire paragraph
  • Use quotes that will have the most rhetorical, argumentative impact in your paper; too many direct quotes from sources may weaken your credibility, as though you have nothing to say yourself, and will certainly interfere with your style

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parenthetical / in-text citations MLA

MLA In Text Citation & Parenthetical Guide

Effective Social Media Policy

Status update: How to have a strong and effective social media policy

Employment Update (Australia) y:Brett FelthamLauren Crossman

https://www.dlapiper.com/en/dubai/insights/publications/2016/02/a-strong-and-effective-social-media-policy/

The top ten priorities for strong and effective social media policies should be:

explaining the risks that can arise through the use of social media and the reasons why having a policy is necessary;

clarifying the permitted uses of social media during work hours and/or using the employer’s resources. This will include when employees are allowed to access social media at work (if at all), when such access is permitted – for example, during an employee’s lunch hour or while the employee is on a break, or at any time – and what will be considered to be excessive use;

confirming that the policy applies in respect of social media use by an employee outside of work hours where that use impacts on the employer or the workplace, including by an employee publishing comments which are referable (whether directly or indirectly) to the employer, its products, other employees, customers, partners, suppliers or competitors;

clarifying prohibited uses of social media, such as an employee engaging in online conduct which may constitute unlawful discrimination, defamation, bullying or harassment. There needs to be careful consideration of how this part of the policy links to an employer’s other existing policies covering those issues. Consideration can also be given to requiring employees to inform their employer when they become aware of any potential breach of the policy by another employee – unlike in other jurisdictions, this concept of “dobbing in” a colleague can be difficult to promote in Australian workplaces;

confirming that social media use must be consistent with an employee’s obligations to comply with all applicable laws, including to not make any comment that may be misleading or deceptive in trade or commerce (in breach of Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (Cth)), and to not disclose any market sensitive information prior to disclosure by the employer (in breach of insider trading laws);

reminding employees of their obligations in respect of the employer’s confidential information and intellectual property, and privacy, copyright and plagiarism issues more generally;

where an employee is subject to a workplace investigation, in addition to requiring an employee to generally assist with that investigation, specifically directing an employee to preserve and not delete relevant social media content, and to provide their employer with reasonable access to that content for the purposes of the investigation;

specifically providing the employer the ability to direct an employee to remove or delete prohibited content;

expressly stating that breach of the policy may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment; and

directing an employee on how they can notify their online connections of their departure from their employer and their acceptance of a new role, and confirming that the inappropriate use of those social media connections can constitute a breach of any post-termination restrictions on soliciting clients.

Need Sample Social Media Policies? Here Are 7 to Inspire Yours

Formative Assessment Tools

Use these tech tools to boost engagement while also getting great feedback about what your students know.

March 26, 2014 Jeff Knutson
Infuse Learning
Infuse Learning is a tablet-based student response system for learning through conversation and collaboration. Teachers can build assessments and track students’ responses. The drawing-response tool (for sketches and diagrams) is a powerful feature here. Also, there’s native-language support for English learners. Read full review.
Kahoot
Kahoot is a game-based classroom response system. Teachers can create quizzes using content from the web. Questions appear on a class screen; without needing an account, students answer in real-time on a mobile device. Kahoot is different in that it creates an engaging competition. Students can also create their own quizzes and assessments. Read full review.
Socrative
Socrative is a student response system with a variety of activities: quizzes, assessments, games, and even exit notes. Teachers control the flow of exercises; students respond in real time. It generates reports to help teachers track learning over time. Read full review.
Turnitin
Turnitin is mostly a tool for promoting originality in students’ writing (or catching plagiarism). However, it’s also a tool to support the writing process — from teacher feedback and grading to peer evaluation and review. There’s also a handy discussion forum feature, with built-in moderation. Read full review.
Poll Everywhere
Poll Everywhere isn’t just for schools, but works well as a classroom response system. Students can respond via text message, Twitter, or a Web browser; teachers can project the results on the Web, or in a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation. Read full review.
TodaysMeet
TodaysMeet is a backchannel to help an audience and presenter connect in real time. Like a closed version of Twitter, posts are limited to 140 characters. Teachers can offer students a live stream for discussion, addressing issues on-the-spot, or as an after-lecture reflective activity. Read full review.
Backchannel Chat
Backchannel Chat is just for educational use. Students don’t have to enter any personal information into the system, and teachers can save, search, and archive discussions. Teachers also get a lot of control with customizable moderation options, a room-locking feature, and filtering for unwelcome content. Read full review.
GoSoapBox
is a student response system offering teachers more than a standard quiz/poll tool. The social Q&A feature allows students to vote the most relevant questions to the top, and a “Confusion Barometer” tool lets teachers track understanding throughout a lesson. Read full review.
Blendspace
Blendspace allows teachers to collect resources from the web and create a customizable, blended-instruction experience for students. Formative assessment tools are built in, allowing multiple question types, and the ability to track students’ progress over time. Read full review.
Collaborize Classroom
Collaborize Classroom allows teachers to create an online classroom community for learning — a home-base for online discussion forums, polls, assessments, and student-driven projects. There are differentiation tools and customized learning opportunities for individuals and small groups. Read full review.

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Class Quiz Games with Quizizz (an Alternative to Kahoot)

Quizizz is an alternative to Kahoot, and there’s also a lot for educators to like. It is very similar to Kahoot, with a few key differences.

Just like Kahoot, the teacher (or student host) chooses a quiz to begin. A five digit game code is provided. Players point their browsers to join.quizzizz.com and input the game code, along with their names. If players are using smartphones or tablets, I display the join link as a QR code.

Quizizz takes a different approach. No projector is necessary becauseplayers see questions and answer options on their own screens. The question order is randomized for each student, so it’s no easy for players to cheat. With Quizizz, players don’t have to wait for the whole class to answer a question before they continue to the next one.

So, Quizizz is player-paced while Kahoot’s pace is determined by the teacher or host. This is the major difference and can be a benefit or a drawback. If you want to pause after each question, then Kahoot is better. The class can stop and discuss after each question, immediately addressing misconceptions. With Quizizz, players zip through questions at their own pace, limiting all discussion to after all questions have been answered.

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