Archive of ‘announcement’ category

Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

Book Announcement: Implementing Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

New book: Implementing Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

by Steve McCarty, Hiroyuki Obari, and Takeshi Sato

Publisher: Springer Singapore / SpringerBriefs in Education (107 pages)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction: Contextualizing Mobile Language Learning in Japan

Chapter 2 Mobile Language Learning Pedagogy: A Sociocultural Perspective

Chapter 3 Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology Case Study:

Smartphone App LINE for EFL Peer Learning

Chapter 4 Osaka Jogakuin University Case Study:

Mobilizing the EFL Curriculum and Campus Infrastructure with iPods and iPads

Chapter 5 Aoyama Gakuin University Case Study:

Blended Learning and Flipped Classrooms utilizing Mobile Devices

Chapter 6 Conclusion: Implementing Language Learning in a Mobile-Oriented Society


This book explores theoretical and practical aspects of implementing mobile language learning in university classrooms for English as a Foreign Language in Japan. The technologies utilized, such as smartphones, iPads, and wi-fi, integrate students’ hand-held devices into the campus network infrastructure. The pedagogical aims of ubiquitous mobile learning further incorporate social media, blended learning, and flipped classroom approaches into the curriculum. Chapter 1 defines mobile language learning within dimensions of e-learning and technology-assisted language learning, prior to tracing the development of mobile learning in Japan. Chapter 2 documents the sociocultural theory underpinning the authors’ humanistic approach to implementation of mobile technologies. The sociocultural pedagogy represents a global consensus of leading educators that also recognizes the agency of Asian learners and brings out their capability for autonomous learning. Case studies of universities, large and small, public and private, are organized similarly in Chapters 3 to 5. Institutional/pedagogical and technological context sections are followed by detailed content on the implementation of initiatives, assessment of effectiveness, and recommendations for other institutions. Distinct from a collection of papers, this monograph tells a story in brief book length about theorizing and realizing mobile language learning, describing pioneering and original initiatives of importance to practitioners in other educational contexts.


Steve McCarty lectures for Kansai University, Osaka Jogakuin University, KIC Graduate School of IT, and the government agency JICA.

Hiroyuki Obari, PhD in Computer Science, is a Professor at the Aoyama Gakuin University College of Economics in Tokyo.

Takeshi Sato is an Associate Professor at the Division of Language and Culture Studies, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.

Ordering information from Springer

Paperback (ISBN: 978-981-10-2449-8):

eBook (ISBN: 978-981-10-2451-1) or individual chapters:



more on mobile technologies in this IMS blog

LITA social media webinar

Social Media For My Institution; from “mine” to “ours”
Instructor: Plamen Miltenoff
Starting Wednesday October 19, 2016, running for 4 weeks
Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

A course for librarians who want to explore the institutional application of social media. Based on an established academic course at St. Cloud State University “Social Media in Global Context” (more information at ).
Critically examine the institutional need of social media and juxtapose it to its private use. Discussion about the mechanics of choice for recent and future SM tools. Theoretical introduction to the subculture of social media. How to streamline library SM policies with the goals and mission of the institution. Hands-on exercises on creation and dissemination of textual and multimedia content and patrons’ engagement. Brainstorming on suitable for the institution strategies regarding resources, human and technological, workload share, storytelling, and branding.

This is a blended format web course:

The course will be delivered as 4 separate live webinar lectures, one per week on:

Wednesdays, September 21, 28, October 5 and 12
2:00 – 3:00 pm Central
You do not have to attend the live lectures in order to participate. The webinars will be recorded and distributed through the web course platform, Moodle for asynchronous participation. The web course space will also contain the exercises and discussions for the course.

Social media for my institution week one from Plamen Miltenoff

ePub3 and more

Hello OLC Colleague,

Are you preparing students for job skills required in 2020?


Attend our webinar to see how the Embellisher™ Mobile Publishing, Training and Education platform can give you  a way to move your organization’s mobile collaboration and publication systems to a powerful new level.


Whether you are in the public or the private sector, you can benefit from learning how to use VR/AR as well as seeing how multimedia (ePub3) and live streaming technologies can enhance your collaborative and publishing skills.

Student-Centered Instruction Webinar
Nov. 8, 2016 | 1 PM (UTC-7)


We will be covering:

  • How to use live streaming video to collaborate on projects and assignments.
  • How to use AR and VR to create “empathetic” point-of-view.
  • How to give each author/teacher a publishing platform to feature live broadcasts of new books, book trailers, live chat with readers/students, and even “casting” a virtual book tour to bookstores and libraries as patrons can view on their mobile devices.
  • A guided tour of our three ePub3 Creator Studio Templates that are used for collaborative work inside our web app.

Bonus! All attendees will receive a free copy of Professor Jim Musgrave’s book, Running with the Big Dogs: A Creator’s Guide to Using Electronic Media. Also, if you teach online classes, he will give you an Insert-text Grammar Template to use when grading your students’ papers.


Join our free webinar on November 8, 2016 at 1 PM (UTC-7). Register today.

3D Printing Project-Based Curriculum

Inside WIT’s 3D Printing Project-Based Curriculum

Who better to learn about incorporating 3D printing into instruction than from an instructor who taught the curriculum?

Join us on October 26th to hear directly from Assistant Professor Steve Chomyszak who used Stratasys 3D Printing Curriculum to teach a “Special Topics” 3D printing course at the Wentworth Institute of Technology.

During this complimentary webcast, you’ll gain valuable insight into the successes and lessons learned, including:

  • Overview of the 14-week project-based 3D printing curriculum
  • How an interactive learning environment impacted and inspired WIT students
  • How the WIT 3D printing lab went from crickets to buzzing
  • How curriculum measured up according to students
  • And so much more!

bibliography on K12 learning spaces

Bibliography on K12 learning spaces

articles in popular print:

2nd Annual Next Generation Learning Spaces Asia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
10 Tips For Creating Inspiring Learning Spaces Infographic. (2016, January 26). Retrieved from
Active Learning Spaces. (n.d.-a). K-12 Blueprint. Retrieved from
Active Learning Spaces. (n.d.-b). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Architecture’s Pivotal Role in the Future of K 12 Learning (EdSurge News). (2016, July 11). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Bruff, D. (2013, December 19). Flexible Classrooms: Highlights from #Spaces4Learning | Center for Teaching | Vanderbilt University. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Educational Furniture : KI. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Elfring, L. (n.d.). UA-AAU STEM Collaborative Learning Spaces Project. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
fellow, E. S. T. E. is a senior, leadership, thought leader on digital leadership with the I. C. for L. in E. H. also runs a blog on K.-12, & Reflections, A. P. (2016, February 9). 5 Ways Digital Tools Are Transforming the Education Space [Text]. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Homeschooling Articles – – The #1 Homeschooling Community. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Jakes, D. (2014, August 26). All About Design – Strategies for Rethinking Learning Spaces. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
K12 Learning Space. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
K12 learning spaces playbook. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Kurani, D. (2015, April 1). 10 Reasons To Re-Design Your School Space. Retrieved from
Luchs, S. (2016, February 23). Using Space to Realize a Next Gen Learning Vision | NextGen Learning. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
New Learning Environments for 21st Century Learners. (2016, August 27). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Persaud, R. (2014, September 8). Why Learning Space Matters. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Pierce, B. D., & 08/25/15. (n.d.). 3 Ways Mobile Technology Is Transforming Learning Spaces -. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Reimagining Space, Time & Staffing. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Re-Thinking Learning Spaces | Tech Learning. (2013, October 25). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Seidel, V. P., & Fixson, S. K. (2013). Adopting Design Thinking in Novice Multidisciplinary Teams: The Application and Limits of Design Methods and Reflexive Practices: Adopting Design Thinking in Novice Teams. Journal of Product Innovation Management, 30, 19–33.
Slowakiewicz, M. (2016, March 22). STEM School Learning Spaces. Retrieved from
Using Social Media as Learning Spaces. (n.d.). Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
Vickery. (2014, August 18). Are You Hacking Your School’s Learning Spaces? Retrieved October 12, 2016, from
peer-reviewed articles:
Razavi, M. N., & Iverson, L. (2007). Designing for privacy in personal learning spaces. New Review Of Hypermedia & Multimedia, 13(2), 163-185. doi:10.1080/13614560701709861
Jung, I., & Latchem, C. (2011). A model for e-education: Extended teaching spaces and extended learning spaces. British Journal Of Educational Technology, 42(1), 6-18. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00987.x


more on learning spaces in this IMS blog

NISO Webinar IoT

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. (Eastern Time)

About the Webinar

As the cost of sensors and the connectivity necessary to support those sensors has decreased, this has given rise to a network of interconnected devices.  This network is often described as the Internet of Things and it is providing a variety of information management challenges.  For the library and publishing communities, the internet of things presents opportunities and challenges around data gathering, organization and processing of the tremendous amounts of data which the internet of things is generating.  How will these data be incorporated into traditional publication, archiving and resource management systems?  Additionally, how will the internet of things impact resource management within our community?   In what ways will interconnected resources provide a better user experience for patrons and readers?  This session will introduce concepts and potential implications of the internet of things on the information management community.  It will also explore applications related to managing resources in a library environment that are being developed and implemented.

Education in the Internet of Things
Bryan Alexander, Consultant;

How will the Internet of Things shape education? We can explore this question by assessing current developments, looking for future trends in the first initial projects. In this talk I point to new concepts for classroom and campus spaces, examining attendant rises in data gathering and analysis. We address student life possibilities and curricular and professional niches. We conclude with notes on campus strategy, including privacy, network support, and futures-facing organizations.

What Does The Internet of Things Mean to a Museum?
Robert Weisberg, Senior Project Manager, Publications and Editorial Department; Metropolitan Museum of Art;

What does the Internet of Things mean to a museum? Museums have slowly been digitizing their collections for years, and have been replacing index cards with large (and costly, and labor-intensive) CMS’s long before that, but several factors have worked against adopting smart and scalable practices which could unleash data for the benefit of the institution, its collection, and its audiences. Challenges go beyond non-profit budgets in a very for-profit world and into the siloed behaviors learned from academia, practices borne of the uniqueness of museum collections, and the multi-faceted nature of modern museums which include not only curator, but conservators, educators, librarians, publishers, and increasing numbers of digital specialists. What have museums already done, what are they doing, and what are they preparing for, as big data becomes bigger and ever more-networked?
The Role of the Research Library in Unpacking The Internet of Things
Lauren di Monte, NCSU Libraries Fellow, Cyma Rubin Fellow, North Carolina State University

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deceptively simple umbrella term for a range of socio-technical tools and processes that are shaping our social and economic worlds. Indeed, IoT represents a new infrastructural layer that has the power to impact decision-making processes, resources distribution plans, information access, and much more. Understanding what IoT is, how “things” get networked, as well as how IoT devices and tools are constructed and deployed, are important and emerging facets of information literacy. Research libraries are uniquely positioned to help students, researchers, and other information professionals unpack IoT and understand its place within our knowledge infrastructures and digital cultures. By developing and modeling the use of IoT devices for space and program assessment, by teaching patrons how to work with IoT hardware and software, and by developing methods and infrastructures to collect IoT devices and data, we can help our patrons unlock the potential of IoT and harness the power of networked knowledge.

Lauren Di Monte is a Libraries Fellow at NC State. In this role she develops programs that facilitate critical and creative engagements with technologies and develops projects to bring physical and traditional computing into scholarship across the disciplines. Her current research explores the histories and futures of STEM knowledge practices.

What does the internet of things mean for education?

Bryan Alexander:

I’m not sure if the IoT will hit academic with the wave force of the Web in the 1990s, or become a minor tangent.  What do schools have to do with Twittering refrigerators?

Here are a few possible intersections.

  1. Changing up the campus technology space.  IT departments will face supporting more technology strata in a more complex ecosystem.  Help desks and CIOs alike will have to consider supporting sensors, embedded chips, and new devices.  Standards, storage, privacy, and other policy issues will ramify.
  2. Mutating the campus.  We’ve already adjusted campus spaces by adding wireless coverage, enabling users and visitors to connect from nearly everywhere.  What happens when benches are chipped, skateboards sport sensors, books carry RFID, and all sorts of new, mobile devices dot the quad?  One British school offers an early example.
  3. New forms of teaching and learning.  Some of these take preexisting forms and amplify them, like tagging animals in the wild or collecting data about urban centers.  The IoT lets us gather more information more easily and perform more work upon it.  Then we could also see really new ways of learning, like having students explore an environment (built or natural) by using embedded sensors, QR codes, and live datastreams from items and locations.  Instructors can build treasure hunts through campuses, nature preserves, museums, or cities.  Or even more creative enterprises.
  4. New forms of research.  As with #3, but at a higher level.  Researchers can gather and process data using networked swarms of devices.  Plus academics studying and developing the IoT in computer science and other disciplines.
  5. An environmental transformation.  People will increasingly come to campus with experiences of a truly interactive, data-rich world.  They will expect a growing proportion of objects to be at least addressable, if not communicative.  This population will become students, instructors, and support staff.  They will have a different sense of the boundaries between physical and digital than we now have in 2014. Will this transformed community alter a school’s educational mission or operations?

How the internet could evolve to 2026: responding to Pew Posted on

instructional design librarian

Instructional Design Librarians #libraries #edtech #highered

Thursday, October 13 at 3:00 pm EST with guest Joelle Pitts from Kansas State University Libraries.


more on instructional design in this IMS blog

Information Technology and Teacher Education conference


Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education
March 5 – 9, 2017 Austin, Texas, USA

Proposals Due: October 21, 2016

SITE 2017 is the 28th annual conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education. This society represents individual teacher educators and affiliated organizations of teacher educators in all disciplines, who are interested in the creation and dissemination of knowledge about the use of information technology in teacher education and faculty/staff development.

SITE is unique as the only organization which has as its sole focus the integration of instructional technologies into teacher education programs. SITE promotes the development and dissemination of theoretical knowledge, conceptual research, and professional practice knowledge through conferences, books, projects, and the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (JTATE).

You are invited to attend and participate in this annual international forum which offer numerous opportunities to share your ideas, explore the research, development, and applications, and to network with the leaders in this important field of teacher education and technology.

There are over 800 presentations in 25 major topic areas!

The Conference Review Policy requires that each proposal will be peer- reviewed by three reviewers for inclusion in the conference program, and conference proceedings.

Hosted By: – The Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education
Sponsored by: – The Learning and Technology Library

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