Archive of ‘announcement’ category

Collecting, Preserving, and Transforming the News

: National Library of Iceland http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/iceland/

Collecting, Preserving, and Transforming the News

Conference website: https://ifla2017.landsbokasafn.is/

Organizers: National Library of Iceland, IFLA News Media Section (http://www.ifla.org/news-media), and IFLA Information Technology Section

(http://www.ifla.org/it)

Theme & sub-themes

From printed newspapers to born-digital news, libraries and other cultural heritage institutions have a central role in ensuring future access to news content. This conference will examine issues and challenges in collecting and preserving the news and making it available to users. Do access and preservation have different prerequisites? In addition, the conference will explore how news media is used and transformed by researchers and the public.

Can we recognize variable user needs? Do we offer the most suitable APIs?

Proposals should address the main theme and related topics, including but not limited to:

Users’ experiences with digital newspaper collections and their usability expectations

Case studies of patron services for digitized and born-digital news (e.g., management systems, reading devices, printout services, etc.)

How digitized news collections are being used in the digital humanities, by researchers, and by the public

The importance and possibilities of citizen science

Long-term sustainability planning for news collections and the role of institutional commitment in preservation and sustainability planning

How institutions make digital newspaper collections freely accessible

Rules, regulations, or legislation for mandatory deposit of news content, paper or otherwise

Legal deposit libraries offering access to in-copyright digitized newspapers

National Libraries co-operating with newspaper publishing houses in digitization, access, etc.

Data research that benefits preservation practice and planning

Changing collection building in a social media and online world

New methods for media monitoring

Harvesting and preservation of web-only news content

Issues around suppression of digitized/digital news content and take down orders

Other proposals relevant to the main conference theme will also be considered.

Note: Papers from this conference will be considered for a special issue of IFLA Journal. All authors will be invited to use feedback from the conference to revise their work and submit it for peer review in collaboration with the IFLA Journal editorial committee and the conference organizing committee.

Submission Guidelines

Proposal abstracts should be submitted as an MS Word file. Proposal abstracts must be submitted by 27 January 2017, must be in English, and should clearly

include:

Title of proposed paper

Abstract of proposed paper (no more than 300 words)

Name(s) of presenter(s) plus position and/or title

Employer / affiliated institution

Contact information including e-mail address and telephone number

Short biographical statement(s) of presenter(s)

Proposal abstracts should be emailed to all conference committee members:

Minna Kaukonen (minna.kaukonen@helsinki.fi)

Edmund Balnaves (ebalnaves@prosentient.com.au)

Mary Feeney (mfeeney@email.arizona.edu)

Örn Hrafnkelsson (orn@landsbokasafn.is)

Ana Krahmer (ana.krahmer@unt.edu)

Kazuo Takehana (k-takeha@ndl.go.jp)

Kopana Terry (kopana.terry@uky.edu)

Selected presenters will be notified by 3 February 2017. To discuss any matter relating to this Call for Papers, please contact the conference committee members listed above.

Accepted papers

Complete accepted papers should be 3000-6000 words in length and be an original submission not published elsewhere.

Complete accepted papers and accompanying presentation slides must be submitted by 17 April 2017.

Final papers should be written in English.

The papers will be made available on the Conference Website and the News Media Section Website under theCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 license.

Approximately 20 minutes will be allowed for the presentation of the paper.

Registration

Registration information will be posted on the Conference Website at the beginning of 2017.

Important dates

27 January 2017 Proposal abstracts due

3 February 2017 Acceptance notices sent to authors

10 February 2017 Start of registration

10 April 2017 Completed papers and presentations submitted

27-28 April 2017 Conference

Please note The Programme Committee regrets that it has no funding to assist prospective authors and the submission of an abstract must be on the understanding that the costs of attending the conference including registration, travel, accommodation and other expenses, are the responsibility of the presenters of the accepted papers, or their institutions. No financial support can be provided by IFLA, but a special invitation can be issued to authors.

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more about “news” in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=news

education secretary

A Former Education Secretary’s Advice For Betsy DeVos

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more on NCLB
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=no+child+left

Bryan Alexander on digital literacy

Bryan Alexander Interview – The Challenge of Advancing Digital Literacy in Higher Education

 http://www.stevehargadon.com/2016/12/bryan-alexander-interview-challenge-of.html
At the invitation of Adobe Education, I attended the Educause Annual Conference this year and did a quick series of interviews about the education work that Adobe is doing. A huge highlight for me was reconnecting with futurist Bryan Alexander, whom I’d interviewed in 2012 as a part of my Future of Education series, and whose work and voice I’ve continued to really appreciate.
Video Interview here: https://www.facebook.com/AdobeEdEx/videos/691627301000647/
The full study is here: http://adobe.ly/2eGtFuI
http://www.adobeeducate.com/genz/adobe-education-genz

insightgen-z-profile 3

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

future trends

Future Trends Forum with Bryan Alexander on Wednesday, Dec 21st, 2016 at 2:00 pm (EST) is confirmed.

http://events.shindig.com/event/ftf#close

February 11, 2016 – January 31, 2017

Future Trends Forum hosted by Bryan Alexander will address the most powerful forces of change in academia. The founder of the online blog Future Trends in Technology and Education will begin a weekly forum taking place on Thursdays at 2:00 p.m. EST. The goal of the forum is to advance the discussion around the pressing issues at the crossroads of education and technology. Future Trends Forum will feature weekly online video chat conversations where practitioners in the field can contribute and share their most recent experiences in technology and education.

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more on Bryan Alexander in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bryan+alexander

ECIL

5th European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL2017).

http://ecil2017.ilconf.org
http://www.facebook.com/ecil2017

Topics of the Conference include (but not limited with) the following:

  • Information literacy in the workplace
  • Information literacy and employability
  • Information literacy and workforce development
  • Information literacy and career readiness
  • Information literacy and developing critical and creative workers
  • Information literacy and 21st century workplace
  • Information usage in the workplace
  • Information literacy and organisational success
  • Information literacy and competitiveness
  • Critical perspectives on workplace information literacy
  • Information literacy and the neoliberal agenda
  • Information literacy and digital empowerment
  • Information literacy and trans/inter/multiculturalism
  • Information literacy and community engagement
  • Information literacy and social change
  • Information literacy and democracy, citizenship, active participation
  • Information literacy, libraries, the public sphere
  • Information literacy and lifelong learning
  • Information literacy in theoretical context (models, standards, indicators)
  • literacy, visual literacy, health literacy, multi literacy)civic literacy, transliteracy, metaliteracy, e-literacy, digital literacy, computer literacy, scientific iteracy, lInformation literacy and related concepts (transversal competencies, media literacy, data
  • Information literacy research (research strategies, methodology and methods)
  • Information seeking and information behavior
  • Information literacy good practices
  • Information literacy policies and policy development
  • Information literacy and libraries Information literacy and LIS education
  • Information literacy and knowledge management
  • Information literacy across disciplines
  • Information literacy in different cultures and countries
  • Information literacy in different contexts (law, health, etc.)
  • Information literacy and education
  • Information literacy education in different sectors (K-12, higher education, vocational education)
  • Information literacy instruction
  • Information literacy for different groups (adults, children, young people, disadvantaged groups)
  • Information literacy and ethical/social issues
  • Information literacy and emerging technologies

Information literacy in the future

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More on info literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=information+literacy

roku

What is Roku?

http://www.killthecablebill.com/what-is-roku/

Roku TV Review: Supports Netflix, Hulu, Sling TV and More

What is RokuMost of us know Roku as a small black box that allows you to instantly stream your favorite TV shows and movies to your TV, but most are unaware of how much content is really available, and that there is now a Roku TV, Roku Stick and new Roku boxes available. Not only can you stream tens of thousands of movies and TV shows from services like Netflix, Hulu Plus, & Amazon Video On Demand (VOD), but you can also stream sporting events and music from Pandora, iTunes, and MOG.

Roku offers three types of streaming devices and is widely used by people looking for cost effective alternatives to Cable Television. Their product suite includes a line of streaming players, a streaming stick, and TVs with built in Roku streaming technology.

reference and libraries

Basic Reference Skills for Non-Reference Librarians
facilitated by Francisca Goldsmith
4-week eCourse Beginning Monday, February 6, 2017

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272376987_The_Reference_Guide_to_Data_Sources_by_Julia_Bauder

http://vps100323.vps.ovh.ca/NewYorkbooksBox-27/3722198380-the-reference-guide-to-data-sources-by-julia-bauder.pdf

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/article/view/5888/pdf

Bauder, J., Bohstedt, B., & Jones, P. (2011). Muchos Mentores en Iowa: The Pedagogy of Student to Student Mentoring in Information Literacy (pp. 149–154). Presented at the LOEX.

http://commons.emich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1025&context=loexconf2011

Reinventing your Reference Collection from media3693

Reinventing Ourselves as Internet Librarians from notess

Thursdays with the California Library Association (CLA) from Justin Hoenke

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more on reference in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=reference

scoop it

As discussed in http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/06/digital-curation/ and per Ungerer, L. M. (2016). Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566

Scoop This: A Comprehensive Guide to Scoop.it for Content Curation

Gabriella Sannino
https://www.searchenginejournal.com/scoop-this-a-comprehensive-guide-to-scoop-it-for-content-curation/38963/

Content Curation, Not Content Aggregation
Scoop.it is not just another place to drop your RSS feed. It could be, but then it’s just another content aggregator.
curation online also has to demonstrate: mastery, passion, knowledge and expertise. Without such additional layers, a curated collection of links is just a collection of links.”
Using Scoop.it for Content Curation, Branding and Authority Building

Using Relative Keywords to Pull Content

  1. When you read an article you think would do well for your Scoop.it topic, click the Scoop.it bookmarklet, enter the information you want, and publish. This is a handy feature to have when you’re reading or researching about your favorite topics.
  2. Suggestion Engine for Sifting Through Content
    Sometimes you don’t have time to search for content to curate. Scoop.it’s suggestion engine provides you with a list of suggested sites based on the keywords you enter. When you’re ready to add more content to your Scoop.it, simply scroll down the list of RSS feeds.
  3. Adding Your Own Sources for Reliable Content
    Everybody has their favorite reads and twitter users or lists to follow. Scoop.it allows you to add your own sources, making it easier to find good content – not quite so much crud to weed through. RSS feeds, Twitter users, Twitter lists, Twitter searches, a Facebook page, and Google News, Blogs, or Video search: these options give you a variety of ways to include your favorite sources in your “suggested sources” box.

10 Steps To Curate Your Social Media Content With Scoop.it for Increased Value

http://socialmediapearls.com/10-steps-to-curate-your-social-media-content-with-scoop-it-for-increased-value/

Social media curation is when you filter, select, review and reposition quality content on the web for a specific audience and/or topic.

Scoop.it is a semi-automated curation platform. Scoop.it crawls the web according to apre-determined criteria and then allows the curator to review and reposition the filtered material prior to publishing. This repositioning could be in the form of contextual reorganization and/or commentary of the material to provide an overall perspective. Once the material has been curated, Scoop.it allows the curator to publish the material in an attractive web-magazine by topic. This web-magazine organizes each curated article into “sticky posts” on a digital interactive interface as shown in the examples below.

do you fall into any of the following categories 1) struggling to provide fresh consistent quality content for your audience; 2) cannot invest the time to write your blog; 3) looking for ways to expand your audience; 4) want to increase your service offering to your customer base; 5) want to establish yourself as a thought leader on a specific topic; 6) want to increase your social media visibility; 7) looking for other distribution channels to spread your word; and/or 8 ) looking for a curation option that is not automated so you can leave “your finger print”. If the answer is “yes” to one of any of the above, you should consider this option.

Here is how to curate your social media content using  Scoop.it

  1.  Your Name
  2. Your Profile Picture (Avatar)
  3. Your Bio
  4. Topic Title and Icon
  5. Topic Description
  6. Keywords and Sources
  7. Topic Background
  8. Original Post
  9. Curated Post
  10. Dialogue

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