Archive of ‘announcement’ category

Regulations for Distance Education

Breaking News on “Teacher Prep” Regulations for Distance Education

It is proposed that a college’s program could fall short in ONE state and lose the right to offer TEACH grants to distance students in ANY state. That might work if every state used the same criteria, but that’s not required. The “Discussion of Costs, Benefits, and Transfers” is a baffling attempt at measuring activity for which there is no good data.

beyond threaded discussions

Dynamic Discussion Artifacts: Moving Beyond Threaded Discussion in an Online Course

https://moqi.zoom.us/j/672493176

PPT is converted to iSpring.
rubric and examples of the technology they might use (for podcast etc). They are tech ed master students, so they have the background.

differentiated instruction.

michael.manderfeld@mnsu.edu

more on discussion in education in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=discussion&submit=Search

analytics in education

ACRL e-Learning webcast series: Learning Analytics – Strategies for Optimizing Student Data on Your Campus

This three-part webinar series, co-sponsored by the ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Committee, the Student Learning and Information Committee, and the ACRL Instruction Section, will explore the advantages and opportunities of learning analytics as a tool which uses student data to demonstrate library impact and to identify learning weaknesses. How can librarians initiate learning analytics initiatives on their campuses and contribute to existing collaborations? The first webinar will provide an introduction to learning analytics and an overview of important issues. The second will focus on privacy issues and other ethical considerations as well as responsible practice, and the third will include a panel of librarians who are successfully using learning analytics on their campuses.

Webcast One: Learning Analytics and the Academic Library: The State of the Art and the Art of Connecting the Library with Campus Initiatives
March 29, 2016

Learning analytics are used nationwide to augment student success initiatives as well as bolster other institutional priorities.  As a key aspect of educational reform and institutional improvement, learning analytics are essential to defining the value of higher education, and academic librarians can be both of great service to and well served by institutional learning analytics teams.  In addition, librarians who seek to demonstrate, articulate, and grow the value of academic libraries should become more aware of how they can dovetail their efforts with institutional learning analytics projects.  However, all too often, academic librarians are not asked to be part of initial learning analytics teams on their campuses, despite the benefits of library inclusion in these efforts.  Librarians can counteract this trend by being conversant in learning analytics goals, advantages/disadvantages, and challenges as well as aware of existing examples of library successes in learning analytics projects.

Learn about the state of the art in learning analytics in higher education with an emphasis on 1) current models, 2) best practices, 3) ethics, privacy, and other difficult issues.  The webcast will also focus on current academic library projects and successes in gaining access to and inclusion in learning analytics initiatives on their campus.  Benefit from the inclusion of a “short list” of must-read resources as well as a clearly defined list of ways in which librarians can leverage their skills to be both contributing members of learning analytics teams, suitable for use in advocating on their campuses.

my notes:

open academic analytics initiative
https://confluence.sakaiproject.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=75671025

where data comes from:

  • students information systems (SIS)
  • LMS
  • Publishers
  • Clickers
  • Video streaming and web conferencing
  • Surveys
  • Co-curricular and extra-curricular involvement

D2L degree compass
Predictive Analytics Reportitng PAR – was open, but just bought by Hobsons (https://www.hobsons.com/)

Learning Analytics

IMS Caliper Enabled Services. the way to connect the library in the campus analytics https://www.imsglobal.org/activity/caliperram

student’s opinion of this process
benefits: self-assessment, personal learning, empwerment
analytics and data privacy – students are OK with harvesting the data (only 6% not happy)
8 in 10 are interested in personal dashboard, which will help them perform
Big Mother vs Big Brother: creepy vs helpful. tracking classes, helpful, out of class (where on campus, social media etc) is creepy. 87% see that having access to their data is positive

librarians:
recognize metrics, assessment, analytics, data. visualization, data literacy, data science, interpretation

INSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT – N.B.

determine who is the key leader: director of institutional research, president, CIO

who does analyics services: institutional research, information technology, dedicated center

analytic maturity: data drivin, decision making culture; senior leadership commitment,; policy supporting (data ollection, accsess, use): data efficacy; investment and resourcefs; staffing; technical infrastrcture; information technology interaction

student success maturity: senior leader commited; fudning of student success efforts; mechanism for making student success decisions; interdepart collaboration; undrestanding of students success goals; advising and student support ability; policies; information systems

developing learning analytics strategy

understand institutional challenges; identify stakeholders; identify inhibitors/challenges; consider tools; scan the environment and see what other done; develop a plan; communicate the plan to stakeholders; start small and build

ways librarians can help
idenfify institu partners; be the partners; hone relevant learning analytics; participate in institutional analytics; identify questions and problems; access and work to improve institu culture; volunteer to be early adopters;

questions to ask: environmental scanning
do we have a learning analytics system? does our culture support? leaders present? stakeholders need to know?

questions to ask: Data

questions to ask: Library role

learning analytics & the academic library: the state of the art of connecting the library with campus initiatives

questions:
pole analytics library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

literature

causation versus correlation studies. speakers claims that it is difficult to establish causation argument. institutions try to predict as accurately as possible via correlation, versus “if you do that it will happen what.”

++++++++++++

More on analytics in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=analytics&submit=Search

polling clickers education

Using a Mobile Solution to Empower Students in and out of the Classroom

Date: Tuesday, February 23, 2016.  Time: 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time.  Sponsored by: i>clicker

archived webcast here:
http://w.on24.com/r.htm?e=1130110&s=1&k=281F43456B7CB0FF8CFD94D02CBC7DDC&partnerref=theremind
(you need to register. That means, sharing personal data, so fill out cautiously).

REEF polling is a proprietary for i>Clickers.
All other contenstors, TopHat, Turning Technologies etc. have the same scheme

methodology of the chemistry teacher:
flipped classroom active learning

quizzes: may not use external resources, graded on accuracy
questions: may use external sources, graded on participation (chemistry teacher wants students to be active and not penalized for wrong answer).

think: students consider the question. submit an answer individually
pair: instructors shows the results (no answer is given); students form groups to discuss their answers; students must agree on the answer
share: students submit an answer individually; the instructor shows the result (an answer is given)

kate.biberdorf@cm.utexas.edu @FunwithChem

follow up q/s, also standard:
1. what to do, if students don’t have smart phones, 2. CRS integration with CMS 3. data export

More on polling and CRS in the classroom in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=clickers&submit=Search
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=classroom+response+systems&submit=Search
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=crs&submit=Search

More on flipped classroom and active learning in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=flipped+classroom&submit=Search
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=active+learning&submit=Search

universal design

Universal Design for Libraries and Librarians

Instructors: Jessica Olin, Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College; and Holly Mabry, Digital Services Librarian, Gardner-Webb University

Offered: April 11 – May 27, 2016
A Moodle based web course with asynchronous weekly content lessons, tutorials, assignments, and groups discussion.

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Universal Design is the idea of designing products, places, and experiences to make them accessible to as broad a spectrum of people as possible, without requiring special modifications or adaptations. This course will present an overview of universal design as a historical movement, as a philosophy, and as an applicable set of tools. Students will learn about the diversity of experiences and capabilities that people have, including disabilities (e.g. physical, learning, cognitive, resulting from age and/or accident), cultural backgrounds, and other abilities. The class will also give students the opportunity to redesign specific products or environments to make them more universally accessible and usable.

Takeaways
By the end of this class, students will be able to…

  • Articulate the ethical, philosophical, and practical aspects of Universal Design as a method and movement – both in general and as it relates to their specific work and life circumstances
  • Demonstrate the specific pedagogical, ethical, and customer service benefits of using Universal Design principles to develop and recreate library spaces and services in order to make them more broadly accessible
  • Integrate the ideals and practicalities of Universal Design into library spaces and services via a continuous critique and evaluation cycle

 

Here’s the Course Page

Jessica Olin is the Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College. Ms. Olin received her MLIS from Simmons College in 2003 and an MAEd, with a concentration in Adult Education, from Touro University International. Her first position in higher education was at Landmark College, a college that is specifically geared to meeting the unique needs of people with learning differences. While at Landmark, Ms. Olin learned about the ethical, theoretical, and practical aspects of universal design. She has since taught an undergraduate course for both the education and the entrepreneurship departments at Hiram College on the subject.

Holly Mabry received her MLIS from UNC-Greensboro in 2009. She is currently the Digital Services Librarian at Gardner-Webb University where she manages the university’s institutional repository, and teaches the library’s for-credit online research skills course. She also works for an international virtual reference service called Chatstaff. Since finishing her MLIS, she has done several presentations at local and national library conferences on implementing universal design in libraries with a focus on accessibility for patrons with disabilities.

Dates:

February 29 – March 31, 2016

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

 

Technical Requirements:

Moodle login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date. The Moodle-developed course site will include weekly new content lessons and is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructor. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. The course web site will be open for 1 week prior to the start date for students to have access to Moodle instructions and set their browser correctly. The course site will remain open for 90 days after the end date for students to refer back to course material.

Registration Information:

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

digital humanities for librarians

Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: April 4-29, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/112-digital-humanities.php

Digital humanities (DH) has been heralded as the next big thing in humanities scholarship and universities have been creating initiatives and new positions in this field. Libraries, too, have moved to create a presence in the digital humanities community, setting up centers and hiring librarians to staff them. This course is designed as an introduction for librarians or library school students who have little or no exposure to DH and wish to be better positioned to offer DH support or services in a library setting. Participants will read and discuss DH scholarship, learn about frequently-used software, and think about why and how libraries and librarians engage DH. While I will encourage participants to explore more complex computing approaches (and I will support those who do as best I can), this course does not presuppose computing skills such as programming or use of the command line and will not ask participants to do much more than upload files to websites or install and use simple programs. Participants should have an interest and background in humanities scholarship and humanities librarianship and while the readings will focus on activities in the United States, our discussions can be more geographically wide-ranging.

Objectives:

– A basic knowledge of what digital humanities is and how it effects scholarship in the humanities disciplines.

– Exposure to core tools and approaches used by digital humanists.

– An understanding of how libraries and librarians have been involved with digital humanities.

– Critical engagement with the role of librarians and libraries in digital humanities.

This class has a follow-up, Introduction to Text Encoding

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/133-text-encoding.php

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.”

Read an interview with John Russell about this class:

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=769

You can register in this course through the first week of instruction (as long as it is not full). The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants us to send a billing statement or wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us by email to make arrangements: inquiries@libraryjuiceacademy.com

Introduction to Text Encoding

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: May 2-27, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

This course will introduce students to text encoding according to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. Why should you care about text encoding or the TEI Guidelines? The creation of digital scholarly texts is a core part of the digital humanities and many digital humanities grants and publications require encoding texts in accordance with the TEI Guidelines. Students in this course will learn about the use-cases for text encoding and get a basic introduction to the principles of scholarly editing before moving on to learning some XML basics and creating a small-scale TEI project using the XML editor oXygen. We will not cover (beyond the very basics) processing TEI, and students interested in learning about XSLT and/or XQuery should turn to the LJA courses offered on those subjects. Participants should have some experience with digital humanities, as this course is intended as a follow up to the Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians course.

Objectives:

  • A basic understanding of digital scholarly editing as an academic activity.
  • Knowledge of standard TEI elements for encoding poetry and prose.
  • Some engagement with more complex encoding practices, such as working with manuscripts.
  • An understanding of how librarians have participated in text encoding.
  • Deeper engagement with digital humanities practices.

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.” Interview with John Russell

Course Structure

This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional sychronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

value rubrics

Connecting the Dots
Assessing Student Work Using the VALUE Rubrics
1:00 – 4:00
In this session, we will focus on assessing student work using the VALUE Rubrics.
Together, we will look at common work samples from students at different points in
their academic trajectory. We will identify evidence of critical thinking, quantitative
literacy, written communication, and civic engagement from those samples.
We will then connect that evidence to the appropriate domains and levels on
the VALUE rubrics. And we will consider the implications of what we learn for
our own practice in the classroom.

my notes

viewer people than i expected.

group work, our group was charged with connecting the dots: assessing student work using the value rubrics

written communication value rubric

 

Plagiarism in the Social Sciences

Plagiarism in the Social Sciences

Gary A. Hoover Biography:

Gary A. Hoover is currently a Professor and the Chair of the Economics Department at the University of Oklahoma.

Hoover received his Ph.D. in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis in 1998. Since then he has published numerous scholarly research papers, book chapters, and reviews on areas of public policy and income redistribution. He is a leading scholar on academic misconduct, specifically plagiarism, in the economics profession and sits on the REPEC plagiarism committee. Hoover has given over 100 lectures on plagiarism around the world.

He has also been a visiting scholar at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.  He has also been a guest professor at the University of Hannover and the University of Konstanz in Germany along with the University of Vienna in Vienna, Austria.

universal design

Universal Design for Libraries and Librarians

Instructors: Jessica Olin, Director of the Library, Robert H. Parker Library, Wesley College; and Holly Mabry, Digital Services Librarian, Gardner-Webb University.
Starting Monday, April 11, 2016, running for 6 weeks
Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Universal Design is the idea of designing products, places, and experiences to make them accessible to as broad a spectrum of people as possible, without requiring special modifications or adaptations. This course will present an overview of universal design as a historical movement, as a philosophy, and as an applicable set of tools. Students will learn about the diversity of experiences and capabilities that people have, including disabilities (e.g. physical, learning, cognitive, resulting from age and/or accident), cultural backgrounds, and other abilities. The class will also give students the opportunity to redesign specific products or environments to make them more universally accessible and usable. By the end of this class, students will be able to…

  • Articulate the ethical, philosophical, and practical aspects of Universal Design as a method and movement – both in general and as it relates to their specific work and life circumstances
  • Demonstrate the specific pedagogical, ethical, and customer service benefits of using Universal Design principles to develop and recreate library spaces and services in order to make them more broadly accessible
  • Integrate the ideals and practicalities of Universal Design into library spaces and services via a continuous critique and evaluation cycle

Details here and Registration here.

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