Archive of ‘Blog’ category

can a blog be a library web page

Yes it can and I, Plamen Miltenoff, am trying to convince my esteemed colleagues and administration at LRS to consider educause blog hosted at SCSU as the main vehicle for information. Main consideration is that integrated the blog (as social media) with other social media.
At this point, I have not received an indication that I am even understood what am I proposing. It is that desperate.

MEANWHILE,

ALA offers the following eCourse:

Using WordPress to Build Library Websites

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx

it has happened in the past that SCSU money is spent on activity, which I am educated and experienced to deliver. Lets hope that before someone signs for this workshop, h/she might turn fist to me for information.

If you have a desire to bring your departmental Web presence in the 21st century, please feel welcome to contact me.

 

Library; what should be…

Amidst discussions at LRS and forthcoming strategic planning –

The LinkedIn Higher Education Teaching and Learning group has a discussion started:

“The library as space is becoming more important, even as students are able to log on to databases from wherever.”

based on the the article

Spikes, Stacks, and Spaces

from Inside Higher Ed blog: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-community-college-dean/spikes-stacks-and-spaces


  • Julie Steward
    Julie

    Julie Steward

    Instructional Designer

    University libraries are increasingly the ONLY place on campus that has quiet spaces, since cell-phone conversations are ubiquitous. I think a professional shushher would be a nice touch to any library. Either that, or zero-talking floors and okay-with-some-noise-floors alternating.

  • Andrea KiralyAndrea

    Andrea Kiraly

    Information Specialist, Visiting Lecturer at University of Szeged

    Today university/academic libraries have “all-inclusive services” and they are places for social life, too. In my point of view it is very important for libraries to be always ready for changes, to be regenerative, and to find new ways including the needs of next (Y, Z?) generation. A library is a third place, “a place to be”. And study. With librarians behind the scenes.

    Russ B. likes this

  • Russ BarclayRuss

    Russ Barclay

    Visiting Professor at Campbellsville University

    I note many university libraries have become bistros complete with internet access and quiet rooms for students and student teams to meet and work.

    …And, of course, there are books and databases. Whether students attend to those assets is an open question for me.

  • Sharon BlantonSharon

    Sharon Blanton

    Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Hawaii Pacific University

    I had the opportunity to spend some time in a local high school library yesterday. It was a hub of activity with a class in session, students browsing stacks, small group activities, and numerous meetings. I thought it was great to see so many students collaborating and having fun. The students were very engaged.

    Stephen L. likes this

  • Laura GabigerLaura

    Laura Gabiger

    Professor at Johnson & Wales University

    Top Contributor

    It seems important that Matt Reed mentions both the group study areas and the individual quiet spaces in a library. In the past, university libraries tended to be places for individual quiet work. But as Russ and Sharon mention, students have meetings in libraries to work on group activities. If we pay attention to developments in higher education, student work will be increasingly collaborative rather than individual, interdisciplinary rather than narrowly focused in one disciplinary area. In the USA we can find these values set forth in places such as the AAC&U list of high-impact practices, where collaborative assignments and projects are recommended:http://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/hip_tables.pdf

    Some experts recommend that the most valuable things students can learn to do is work on problem-solving with other people who come from diverse backgrounds.

    Libraries may need less space for stacks as printed books and periodicals are replaced with digital storage, but the need for meeting rooms and collaborative study areas may increase. And of course a coffee shop on the premises definitely helps.

    Stephen L. likes this

  • Dr..Myrna FernandoDr..Myrna

    Dr..Myrna Fernando

    Professor 1 at Technological University of the Philippines

    What is the bearing of a library as a Learning Resource Center if not significant to the students. I think it speaks so much on the learning impact not only by the students together with the faculty. This is also the reason why the area of Library is included in institutional/programs accreditation.

50 Shades of Mobile

50 Shades of Mobile

http://www.themobilenative.org/2012/09/50-shades-of-mobile.html

Smart phones (MLDs)
1.   SMCS Mobile Learning Technology
2.   The Mobile Learning Portal
3.   Learning in Hand
4.   Cybrary Man’s Mobile Learning Page
5.   100 Mobile Tools for Teachers
6.   Breaking the Cell Phone Ban
7.   Go Mobile 4 Learning
8.  Tool for Learning or Distraction?
9.  50+ Tips and Resources
10. Learning2Go
iPads
11. iPad Apps Separated by Subject Area
12. iPad/iPod Resources
13. 102 Interesting Ways to Use iPads in the Classroom
14. Middle School iPad Apps
15. iPads in Education Wiki
16. Mobile Learning Integration
17. Apps for Special Needs
18. 50 Resources for iPad use in the Classroom
19. iPad in Education Resources Worth Exploring
20. 39 Sites for Using iPads in the Classroom
21. 32 iPad Tips and Tricks
22. i Educational Apps Review
23. iSchool Initiative
Blogs
24. Cell phones in Learning
25. The Mobile Native
26. The Mobile Learner
27. Going Mobile
28. Mobile Learning
29. mLearnopedia
30. Mobile ESL
31. Learning in Hand
32. Ubiquitous Thoughts
33. m-learning is good
34. The Mobile Learning Edge
35. @Ignatia Webs
36. K-12 Mobile Learning
37. Mobile Learning 21
38. Float Learning
39. mLearning Trends
40. mLearning: Beyond the Digital Divide
41. The Innovative Educator
42. The m-Learning Revolution
43. Learnlets
BYOD/BYOT
44. BYOD in the 21st Century
45. A New Vision for Mobile
46. BYOD Toolbox
47. BYOD “Food For Thought”
Videos
48. GoKnow Mobile Learning Videos
49. Thoughts on the State of Mobile Learning
50. Why Mobile Learning

25 Smart #SocialMedia Tips For #EdLeaders

http://gettingsmart.com/2013/10/25-smart-socialmedia-tips-edleaders/

 

5 Learning Strategies

  1. Track relevant hashtags on twitter (I use Hootsuite)

  2. Use a reader to scan key blogs (I switched from iGoogle to Ustart & Feedly)

  3. Like causes/companies and track on Facebook

  4. Learn about your audience and growth  (we use Sprout Social and Google Analytics)

  5. Open a doc for good question you receive; use for future blogs

5 Impact Strategies

  1. Blog at least weekly about what you learn

  2. Tweet 5-10/day about what’s catching your attention

  3. Follow people doing good work

  4. Use hashtags/handles when you tweet

  5. Capture contacts in a CRM database for easy sharing

5 Leadership Strategies

  1. Write a weekly staff blast

  2. Publish a weekly community blast

  3. Make contact information available publically

  4. Create multiple points of entry

  5. Create opportunities for discussions and feedback

5 Brand-Building Strategies

  1. Use simple crisp graphics

  2. Create a clean easy to navigate homepage

  3. Add Facebook & Twitter icons to homepage

  4. Blog weekly and make it easy to share

  5. Keep branding between all channels cohesive

5 Survival Strategies

  1. Carve out learning and sharing hour every morning

  2. Don’t obsess the rest of the day

  3. Haters will hate; pick your battles

  4. Clear your inbox twice daily; flag/prioritize follow ups

  5. Turn it all off and go for a walk

Pro Domo Sua: Are We Puppets in a Wired World? Surveillance and privacy revisited…

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/nov/07/are-we-puppets-wired-world/

Are We Puppets in a Wired World?

But while we were having fun, we happily and willingly helped to create the greatest surveillance system ever imagined, a web whose strings give governments and businesses countless threads to pull, which makes us…puppets. The free flow of information over the Internet (except in places where that flow is blocked), which serves us well, may serve others better. Whether this distinction turns out to matter may be the one piece of information the Internet cannot deliver.