Archive of ‘collaboration and creativity’ category

Measuring Learning Outcomes of New Library Initiatives

International Conference on Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries 2018 (QQML2018)

conf@qqml.net

Where: Cultural Centre Of Chania
ΠΝΕΥΜΑΤΙΚΟ ΚΕΝΤΡΟ ΧΑΝΙΩΝ

https://goo.gl/maps/8KcyxTurBAL2

also live broadcast at https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

When: May 24, 12:30AM-2:30PM (local time; 4:40AM-6:30AM, Chicago Central)

Programme QQML2018-23pgopv

Session 1:
http://qqml.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/SESSION-Miltenoff.pdf

Session Title: Measuring Learning Outcomes of New Library Initiatives Coordinator: Professor Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS, St. Cloud State University, USA Contact: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu Scope & rationale: The advent of new technologies, such as virtual/augmented/mixed reality, and new pedagogical concepts, such as gaming and gamification, steers academic libraries in uncharted territories. There is not yet sufficiently compiled research and, respectively, proof to justify financial and workforce investment in such endeavors. On the other hand, dwindling resources for education presses administration to demand justification for new endeavors. As it has been established already, technology does not teach; teachers do; a growing body of literature questions the impact of educational technology on educational outcomes. This session seeks to bring together presentations and discussion, both qualitative and quantitative research, related to new pedagogical and technological endeavors in academic libraries as part of education on campus. By experimenting with new technologies such as Video 360 degrees and new pedagogical approaches such as gaming and gamification, does the library improve learning? By experimenting with new technologies and pedagogical approaches, does the library help campus faculty to adopt these methods and improve their teaching? How can results be measured, demonstrated?

More information and bibliography:

https://www.academia.edu/Documents/in/Videogame_and_Virtual_World_Technologies_Serious_Games_applications_in_Education_and_Training

https://www.academia.edu/Documents/in/Measurement_and_evaluation_in_education

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/QQML-International-Conference-575508262589919/

 

 

 

Exemplary Course Program Rubric

Exemplary Course Program Rubric

http://www.blackboard.com/resources/catalyst-awards
if problems with the link above, try this one:
/bb_exemplary_course_rubric_apr2017.pdf

Course Design

Course Design addresses elements of instructional design. For the purpose of this rubric, course design includes such elements as structure of the course, learning objectives, organization of content, and instructional strategies.

Interaction and Collaboration

Interaction denotes communication between and among learners and instructors, synchronously or asynchronously. Collaboration is a subset of interaction and refers specifically to those activities in which groups are working interdependently toward a shared result. This differs from group activities that can be completed by students working independently of one another and then combining the results, much as one would when assembling a jigsaw puzzle with parts of the puzzle worked out separately then assembled together. A learning community is defined here as the sense of belonging to a group, rather than each student perceiving himself/herself studying independently.

Assessment

Assessment focuses on instructional activities designed to measure progress toward learning outcomes, provide feedback to students and instructors, and/or enable grading or evaluation. This section addresses the quality and type of student assessments within the course.

Learner Support

Learner Support addresses the support resources made available to students taking the course. Such resources may be accessible within or external to the course environment. Learner support resources address a variety of student services.

+++++++++++
more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

more on rubrics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=rubric

resources on Finland Phenomenon

link to the DVD: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2101464/

also available here:

or here

https://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2011/05/02/the-finland-phenomenon-inside-the-worlds-most-surprising-school-system/#2e72f37a572d

https://edexcellence.net/articles/the-finland-phenomenon-inside-the-worlds-most-surprising-school-system

http://www.progressiveteacher.in/the-finnish-phenomenon-in-education/

 

edtech implementation fails

5 All-Too-Common Ways Edtech Implementations Fail

By Chris Liang-Vergara and Kerry Gallagher (Columnist)     Apr 6, 2017

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-04-06-5-all-too-common-ways-edtech-implementations-fail

On the surface, adopting technology to support teacher needs or student challenges isn’t terribly complex: define the problem you’re trying to solve, identify the right tools for the job, and implement the tools effectively and with fidelity.

challenges. End users are too often removed from the decision-making process during procurement. Educators argue that too many products don’t actually meet the needs of teachers or students. Still others worry that it is too easy to implement new and popular technology without considering whether it is research-based and effective.

Only 33 percent of parents surveyed by the Learning Assembly said their child’s school did an excellent job using technology to tailor instruction.

  • Understanding Purpose

Technology is just a tool, not a means in and of itself. Any school or teacher that sets out to use technology for its sake alone, and not in the service of personalizing learning or addressing specific needs, is on a mission to fail.

  • Insufficient Modeling of Best Practices

A survey from Samsung found that 37 percent of teachers say they would love to use technology but don’t know how, and 76 percent say they would like a professional development day dedicated to technology.

ideos that focus on scaling and modeling best practices (produced by places like the Teaching Channel and The Learning Accelerator) can help teachers and schools do this.

  • Bad First Impressions

Teachers face initiative fatigue: They are constantly being asked to implement new programs, integrate new technologies, and add on layers of responsibility. In one Wisconsin district, nearly half of teachers felt ongoing district initiatives were a “significant area of concern.”

Forward-thinking schools take the time to learn from the challenges of other schools, and recruit a coalition of the willing.

  • Real-World Usability Challenges

Relying on multiple devices (remote, clicker, iPad, computer mouse) to launch or navigate technology can be difficult. Additionally, teachers may start to use a tool, only to realize it is not flexible enough to meet their original needs, fit into the constraints of their particular school or classroom, or allow them to integrate their own content or supplemental resources.

  • The Right Data to Track Progress

Lack of useful data, problem definition, weak teacher buy-in, first impressions, and usability challenges all have the potential to torpedo smart technology products.

 

STAR Symposium 2018

https://softchalkcloud.com/lesson/serve/tAyfSOjZTkVW05/html

Keynote: Dr. Todd Zakrajsek, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

“Teaching for Brain-based Learning”

+++++++++++++++++

Effective Online Engagement
Camille Brandt, Bemidji State University

student is a boxed term. but there are flavors; undergrad vs grad, what takeaways they are looking for, categories of students

ask for expectations, outcomes, and keep touching bases during class.

Vocaroo.com

++++++++++++++++++

Grading Participation in an Online Course

Kerry Marrer, St. Cloud State University

Kate Mooney, St. Cloud State University

Kris Portz, St. Cloud State University

+++++++++++++++++++

What’s a FIG? Inquiring Minds Want to Know!

Miki Huntington, Minneapolis Community and Technical College

COP Community of Practice. Stipends – may be or not. May be only a book.

topics: online learning, academic technologies etc

offering support: to one another in a collaborative environment. Commenting to each other notes.

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ijco6s9bNBuD5_fYmrRTgKzubCXFM6GX

learning spaces and stem students

The Next 10 Years: Helping STEM Students Thrive series, on January 10th, from 12-1:30 PM ET. The topic will be learning spaces with the following guest speakers:

  • Jeanne L. Narum, Principal, Learning Spaces Collaboratory

Jeanne will discuss what she has learned about what works, why and how it works in achieving sustainable institutional transformation in the world of planning spaces for learning in the undergraduate setting.

  • Lisa Stephens, Sr. Strategist- SUNY Academic Innovation – University at Buffalo
  • Rebecca Rotundo, Instructional Technology Specialist, University at Buffalo

Lisa and Rebecca will share their experience in FLEXspace (Flexible Learning Environments eXchange) an open education repository project which has expanded to over 2,600+ users from 1,200+ educational institutions across 42 countries.

  • Xin Li, Associate University Librarian, Cornell

Xin will share information about the Library’s initiative to install a Portal on the Cornell campus in Sept. 2018, with the goal to engage faculty, students, and the community in live conversations with Portal users in different countries, cultures, or life circumstances, such as what others do for STEM education.

For more information on the speakers and to register and log into the event please go tohttps://gateway.shindig.com/event/learningspaces

This collaboration between Cornell University and the University at Buffalo featuring the perspectives of national thought leaders and institutional representatives about expanding the participation of women in undergraduate STEM education at different scales.

This interactive, online series features a different topic per month. Each session kicks off with an introduction by our distinguished thought leaders followed by institutional representatives from Cornell University and the University at Buffalo who will share insights from their campuses. Participants may join the conversation, ask questions, share experiences, build networks and learn more about:

·         Innovations that can expand female or underrepresented minority student participation and success in STEM undergraduate education.

·         Effective evidence-based STEM teaching practices commonly adopted at research universities.

·         Unique institutional and cultural challenges to achieving STEM diversity.

·         What difference at scale looks like.

+++++++++++++++
more on learning spaces in academic environment in this iMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+spaces

John Craven

The Wisdom of Crowds

http://wisdomofcrowds.blogspot.com/2009/12/introduction-part-v.html

he assembled a team of men with a wide range of knowledge, including mathematicians, submarine specialists, and salvage men. Instead of asking them to consult with each other to come up with an answer, he asked each of them to offer his best guess about how likely each of the scenarios was. To keep things interesting, the guesses were in the form of wagers, with bottles of Chivas Regal as prizes.

Needless to say no one of these pieces of information could tell Craven where the Scorpion was. But Craven believed that if he put all the answers together, building a composite picture of how the Scorpion died, he’d end up with a pretty good idea of where it was.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._Craven

The Mad Genius from the Bottom of the Sea

CARL HOFFMAN DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06.01.05.

The Mad Genius from the Bottom of the Sea

Craven is hard to keep up with. His mind darts from why the Navy should make subs out of glass to the sad end of his long telephone friendship with the late Marlon Brando to the remarkable prodigiousness of his small experimental Hawaiian vineyard.

Craven’s system exploits the dramatic temperature difference between ocean water below 3,000 feet – perpetually just above freezing – and the much warmer water and air above it. That temperature gap can be harnessed to create a nearly unlimited supply of energy. Although the scientific concepts behind cold-water energy have been around for decades, Craven made them real when he founded the state-funded Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii in 1974 on Keahole Point, near Kona.

1 2 3 8