InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'design' Category

Instructional Design

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th May 2015

7 Things You Should Know About Developments in Instructional Design

http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/7-things-you-should-know-about-developments-instructional-design

Please read the entire EducCause article here: eli7120

discussion of IMS with faculty:

  • pedagogical theories
  • learning outcome
  • design activities
  • students’ multimedia assignments, which lead to online resources
  • collaboration with other departments for the students projects
  • moving the class to online environment (even if kept hybrid)

What is it?

the complexity of the learning environment is turning instructional design into a more dynamic activity, responding to changing educational models and expectations. Flipped classrooms, makerspaces, and competency-based learning are changing how instructors work with students, how students work with course content, and how mastery is verified. Mobile computing, cloud computing, and data-rich repositories have altered ideas about where and how learning takes place.

How does it work?

One consequence of these changes is that designers can find themselves filling a variety of roles. Today’s instructional designer might work with subject-matter experts, coders, graphic designers, and others. Moreover, the work of an instructional designer increasingly continues throughout the duration of a course rather than taking place upfront.

Who’s doing it?

The responsibility for designing instruction traditionally fell to the instructor of a course, and in many cases it continues to do so. Given the expanding role and landscape of technology—as well as the growing body of knowledge about learning and about educational activities and assessments— dedicated instructional designers are increasingly common and often take a stronger role.

Why is it significant?

The focus on student-centered learning, for example, has spurred the creation of complex integrated learning environments that comprise multiple instructional modules. Competency-based learning allows students to progress at their own pace and finish assignments, courses, and degree plans as time and skills permit. Data provided by analytics systems can help instructional designers predict which pedagogical approaches might be most effective and tailor learning experiences accordingly. The use of mobile learning continues to grow, enabling new kinds of learning experiences.

What are the downsides?

Given the range of competencies needed for the position, finding and hiring instructional designers who fit well into particular institutional cultures can be challenging to the extent that instructors hand over greater amounts of the design process to instructional designers, some of those instructors will feel that they are giving up control, which, in some cases, might appear to be simply the latest threat to faculty authority and autonomy. My note: and this is why SCSU Academic Technology is lead by faculty not IT staff. 

Where is it going?

In some contexts, instructional designers might work more directly with students, teaching them lifelong learning skills. Students might begin coursework by choosing from a menu of options, creating their own path through content, making choices about learning options, being more hands-on, and selecting best approaches for demonstrating mastery. Educational models that feature adaptive and personalized learning will increasingly be a focus of instructional design. My note: SCSU CETL does not understand instructional design tendencies AT ALL. Instead of grooming faculty to assume the the leadership role and fill out the demand for instructional design, it isolates and downgrades (keeping traditional and old-fashioned) instructional design to basic tasks of technicalities done by IT staff.

What are the implications for teaching and learning?

By helping align educational activities with a growing understanding of the conditions,
tools, and techniques that enable better learning, instructional designers can help higher education take full advantage of new and emerging models of education. Instructional
designers bring a cross-disciplinary approach to their work, showing faculty how learning activities used in particular subject areas might be effective in others. In this way, instructional
designers can cultivate a measure of consistency across courses and disciplines in how educational strategies and techniques are incorporated. Designers can also facilitate the
creation of inclusive learning environments that offer choices to students with varying strengths and preferences.

More on instructional design in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/13/instructional-design/

Posted in design, instructional technology | No Comments »

Tips on Pairing Fonts Well

Posted by Julia Robeck on 18th February 2015

Tips on pairing fonts well using four methods:

how to pair fonts

This is extremely helpful when designing anything with typography.

types

You can use color and font weight to add interest and differentiate between words, like PayPal and Piktochart below.

contrast

Applying different font sizes or typefaces within the same font classes creates differences between headings, subheading, and body text.

similarity

Combine your text with a picture and you’ve got limitless potential to create an interesting moment.

content

http://piktochart.com/typography-things-you-need-to-know-to-pair-fonts-well/?utm_source=intercom&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly-tip-feb

Check out this post for more infographics resources.

Posted in design | No Comments »

“whiteboard screencasting” and “lecture capture” apps: please enter your choices and suggestions

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 24th October 2013

Greg Jorgensen emailed us with his new darling:

Explain Everything – https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.morriscooke.explaineverything

and raises a very good question:

What do we know and how do we organize our tools and apps for whiteboard screencasting and lecture capture?

Screencasting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-learning#Screencasting

Screencast
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screencast

Greg’s choice of the day is atop of a list from the Ed Tech/y and Mobile Learning web site:
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/6-useful-ipad-apps-for-creating.html

next on that top-6-list are

Teach

Show Me

Educreations Interactive Whiteboard

Doodlecast Pro

Pixntell

Doceri (http://doceri.com/) is a very promissing app, which Bob Lessinger was pushing to be installed on campuos computers (being free), but it is ONLY iPAD-bound (not even iPHone or iTouch)
In addition to Doceri: Stage : Interactive Whiteboard and Document Camera and Splashtop Whiteboard per: 3 Apps to Turn Your iPad into Interactive Whiteboard ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Here is a neat table about the compatibility (iOS and Android) for several of these apps:
http://www.elcamino.edu/administration/staffdev/training/whiteboardscreencasting.pdf

Here is another good resource from Alaska. The screencasting apps reviewed are the same as above, but other good sources regarding a pedagogy involving the technology.

A broader approach to this issue (Presentation & Screencasting Apps) on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/itechservices/presentation-screencasting-apps/

More apps and possibilities, as well as “how-to” directions here:
http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com/2011/06/07/how-i-make-screencasts-the-whiteboard-screencast/

Here is an useful blog entry, comparing  ExlpainEverything with Educreation —
http://freebiologyschool.blogspot.com/2013/04/explaineverything-app-better-than.html

More apps:

Lecturnity ( http://www.lecturnity.com )

Tegrity http://tegr.it/

FlySketch http://flyingmeat.com/flysketch/

http://presentationtube.com/
a lengthy review is available here: http://smorgastech.blogspot.com/?goback=%2Egde_2038260_member_5807615489219772416#%21

Posted in Android, design, Digital literacy, digital storytelling, distance learning, distributive learning, educational technology, gaming, information literacy, information technology, iPAD, learning objects, media literacy, mobile apps, mobile learning, open learning, technology literacy, whiteboard screencasting app | 4 Comments »

basics of design: new handout

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 6th February 2013

The new, 10th edition of “instructional Technology and Media for Learning” by Smaldino et al is out. on p. 191 there is a good layout of the basics for design as discuss during the design session of January 22, 2013. Link to the handouts of that session here:  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/01/22/basics-of-design/

This is the link to a scanned copy of the pages related to visual design: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/informedia/design/visual_design_smaldino.pdf

Posted in collaboration and creativity, design | No Comments »

Adobe Photoshop sessions in February

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st February 2013

Please consider a series of Adobe Photoshop sessions in February:

Workshop registration at:

https://secure.mnsu.edu/mnscupd/login/default.asp?campusid=0073

Computer Skills


Photoshop, Part 1 of 4

 

Monday, February 04, 2013 at 11:00 AM until Monday, February 04, 2013 at 11:45 AM 

Sponsoring Campus: St. Cloud State University 
Location: MC-205

Photoshop, Part 2 of 4

 

Monday, February 11, 2013 at 11:00 AM until Monday, February 11, 2013 at 11:45 AM 

Sponsoring Campus: St. Cloud State University 
Location: MC-205 

Photoshop, Part 3 of 4

 

Monday, February 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM until Monday, February 18, 2013 at 11:45 AM 

Sponsoring Campus: St. Cloud State University 
Location: MC-205

Photoshop, Part 4 of 4

 

Monday, February 25, 2013 at 11:00 AM until Monday, February 25, 2013 at 11:45 AM 

Sponsoring Campus: St. Cloud State University 
Location: MC-205

Posted in design, Photoshop, technology | No Comments »

basics of design

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 22nd January 2013

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2PM, we met to discuss the basics of design, graphic design in particular.

Sliderocket and SLideshare

Here is the handout with sources and outlines. Pls feel welcome to contribute with your sources and ideas.

Design Basics

Handouts

–          What is design and how to we approach it

to prepare the preliminary sketch or the plans for (a work to be executed), especially to plan the form and structure of
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/design
what is graphic design
The process and art of combining text and graphics and communicating an effective message in the design of logos, graphics, brochures, newsletters, posters, signs, and any other type of visual communication is the formal, short definition of graphic design. Today’s graphic designers often use desktop publishing software and techniques to achieve their goals.
http://desktoppub.about.com/cs/basic/g/graphicdesign.htm

–          Why is it important to consider it
Graphic design helps clarify meaning and ease communication from one person (persons) to another, and it does so in a few ways.
http://www.quora.com/Why-is-graphic-design-important

–          How do we enact it

Hands-on exercise: create well-designed PowerPoint.

–          Keep it simple
Your slides should have plenty of white space, or negative space. Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding. The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.

–          Limit bullet points and text
The best slides may have no text at all.

–          Limit transitions and builds (animation)

–          Use high quality graphics

–          Have a visual theme but avoid using PowerPoint templates

–          Use color well
Color evokes feelings. Color is emotional. The right color can help persuade and motivate. Studies show that color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension and retention.
You do not need to be an expert in color theory, but it’s good for business professionals to know at least a bit on the subject. Colors can be divided into two general categories: cool (such as blue and green) and warm (such as orange and red). Cool colors work best for backgrounds, as they appear to recede away from us into the background. Warm colors generally work best for objects in the foreground (such as text) because they appear to be coming at us.

-          Choose your fonts well
Fonts communicate subtle messages in and of themselves, which is why you should choose fonts deliberately. Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold). Make sure you know the difference between a serif font (e.g., Times New Roman) and a sans-serif font (e.g., Helvetica or Arial).
Serif fonts were designed to be used in documents filled with lots of text. They’re said to be easier to read at small point sizes, but for onscreen presentations, the serifs tend to get lost due to the relatively low resolution of projectors. Sans- serif fonts are generally best for PowerPoint presentations, but try to avoid the ubiquitous Helvetica.

-          Spend time in the slider sorter
According to the Segmentation Principle of multimedia learning theory, people comprehend better when information is presented in small chunks or segments. By getting out of the Slide view and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing. In this view, you may decide to break up one slide into, say, two or three slides so that your presentation has a more natural and logical flow or process.

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-slide-design-tips-for-producing-powerful-and-effective-presentations/6117178

Graphic Design Fundamentals
http://www.garrreynolds.com/design/basics.html

Graphic Design Basics

http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/design/graphic-design-basics-elements/

50 Totally Free Lessons in Graphic Design Theory

http://psd.tutsplus.com/articles/web/50-totally-free-lessons-in-graphic-design-theory/

Graphic Design: The New Basics

http://www.gdbasics.com/

Know Thy User: The Role of Research in Great Interactive Design

http://www.slideshare.net/frogdesign/know-thy-user-the-role-of-research-in-great-interactive-design

Basics of Web Design

http://webdesign.about.com/od/webdesigntutorials/a/aa070504.htm

Basics of Web Design

http://ontwik.com/ui/basics-of-web-design/

Posted in collaboration and creativity, design | No Comments »