Archive of ‘digital citizenship’ category

big data and the government

What can the government do about big data fairness?

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/05/23/big-data-fairness.aspx

At a Ford Foundation conference dubbed Fairness by Design, officials, academics and advocates discussed how to address the problem of encoding human bias in algorithmic analysis. The White House recently issued a report on the topic to accelerate research into the issue.

The FTC released two studies on how big data is used to segment consumers into profiles and interests.

U.S. CTO Megan Smith said the government has been “creating a seat for these techies,” but that training future generations of data scientists to tackle these issues depends on what we do today. “It’s how did we teach our children?” she said. “Why don’t we teach math and science the way we teach P.E. and art and music and make it fun?”

“Ethics is not just an elective, but some portion of the main core curriculum.”

more on big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

online risk and teenagers

Researchers: Forget Internet Abstinence; Teens Need some Online Risk

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/16/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/05/16/researchers-forget-internet-abstinence-teens-need-to-face-some-amount-of-online-risk.aspx

My note: after years of imposing Internet filters at schools, “cap” students’ natural curiosity by denying open access to the Internet, etc., this is the first article, which openly defies the bureaucratic / technocratic approach to regulation of the acquisition of knowledge at American schools.

the conclusion from a Pennsylvania State University research project that examined adolescent online safety. This approach includes an important role for teachers as “trusted confidantes” and “educated advisors.”

The results, “Dear Diary: Teens Reflect on Their Weekly Online Risk Experiences,” were published by the Association for Computing Machinery and presented at the organization’s recent Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

“Teens have a strong sense of cost vs. reward, so if we can educate them more clearly on the costs associated with their actions, they may make better decisions on their own,”

individual use of Internet and cloud services

Internet and cloud services – statistics on the use by individuals. Half of Europeans used the internet on the go and a fifth saved files on internet storage space in 2014

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Internet_and_cloud_services_-_statistics_on_the_use_by_individuals

Use of internet and other means for sharing files electronically, EU-28, 2014 (% of individuals)4

Use of internet and other means for sharing files electronically, EU-28, 2014 (% of individuals)4

REP in digital citizenship

Digital citizenship is more important than ever

By Mike Ribble 9/15/2015

R is for respect yourself and others. 

Etiquette. Students need to understand how their technology use affects others. Remind them that there is a person on the other end of their text, tweet, comment or post.

Access. Not everyone has the same opportunities with technology, whether the issue is  physical, socio-economic or location. Those who have more access to technology need to help those who don’t.

Law. The ease of using online tools has allowed some people to steal, harass and cause problems for others online. Students need to know they can’t take content without permission, or at least give credit to those who created it.

E is for educating yourself and others. 

Literacy. Learning happens everywhere. Regardless of whether we get our information from friends, family or online, we need to be aware that it might not be correct. Students need to understand technology and what it can do and be willing to learn new skills so they can use it properly.

Communication. Knowing when and where to use technology is important. Using email, text or social media may not be the best method for interacting with someone. Students need to think about the message first, then the method, and decide if the manner and audience is appropriate.

Commerce. Technology allows us to buy and sell across the globe. Students should be careful about sharing personal and credit card information. Online commerce comes with risks.

P is for protecting yourself and others.

Rights and responsibilities. Build trust so that if something happens online, students are willing to share their problems or concerns about what has happened. Students should know who they are friends with on social networking sites so that they can remain safe online.

Security. It is everyone’s responsibility to guard their tools and data by having software and applications that protect them from online intruders. When we are all connected, everyone is responsible for security.

Health and wellness. There needs to be a balance between the online world and the real world. Students should establish limits with technology and spend quality face-to-face time with friends and family.

++++++++++++++++++++

More on digital citizenship in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

wearables

Report: Wearables To Top 10 Million Shipments in 2016

By Joshua Bolkan 03/21/16

Global sales of wearable devices will exceed 10 million this year, up 32.8 percent over 2015, according to a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC). That total will more than double by the end of the forecast period, 2020, to hit 237.1 million shipments if the company’s prediction holds true.

“Watch and wristband shipments will reach a combined total of 100 million shipments in 2016, up from 72.2 million in 2015,” according to a news release. “Other form factors, such as clothing, eyewear, and hearables, are expected to reach 9.8 million units in 2016 and will more than double their share by 2020. This will open the door for new experiences, use cases, and applications going forward.

rethinking intelligence

Rethinking Intelligence: How Does Imagination Measure Up?

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2016/04/11/rethinking-intelligence-how-does-imagination-measure-up

Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman When he was young, Kaufman had central auditory processing disorder, which made it hard for him to process verbal information in real time. He was asked to repeat third grade because he was considered a “slow” learner.

Kaufman thinks the traditional IQ test does a good job of measuring general cognitive ability, but says it misses all the ways that ability interacts with engagement. An individual’s goals within the learning classroom and excitement about a topic affect how he or she pursues learning, none of which is captured on IQ tests. Worse, those tests are often used to filter people in or out of special programs.

FOUR PRACTICES TO CULTIVATE CHILDREN’S CREATIVITY

  1. allowing more solitary reflective time in kids’ schedules. Whether it’s the constant demands on attention at school or in after-school activities, there often isn’t enough time in a child’s day when she can switch off the executive functioning network and tap into the imagination network.
  2. “We support obsessive passion, but not harmonious passion,” Kaufman said. He defines harmonious passion as a core part of people’s identity that makes them feel good about themselves. Harmonious passion is characterized by flexible engagement, where a child can abandon the pursuit if it isn’t paying dividends.
  3. give young kids a diverse set of experiences in order to increase the chances of inspiration. “Lots of things add meaning to our lives,” he said.
  4. educators, parents, and policymakers need to reset their mindsets around student ability. “Kids who think differently are not appreciated in our school system at all

it’s even worth measuring imagination, but Kaufman believes that measurement is important so researchers can see how changing behavior affects creative achievement. But he hopes the measurements are never used as another sorting mechanism.

My note: Kaufman makes a new call for an old trend. The futility of testing is raging across the United States K12 system. Higher education is turned into the last several decades (similarly to the United States health care system) into a cash cow. When the goal is profit, then good education goes down the drain. Cultivating children’s creativity cannot happen, when the foremost goals to make more money, which inevitably entails spending less cash (not only on teacher’s salaries).

 

ransomware

Adobe issues emergency update to Flash after ransomware attacks

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-adobe-systems-cyber-ransomware-idUSKCN0X502K

Ransomware

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ransomware

Ransomware is a type of malware that restricts access to the infected computer system in some way, and demands that the user pay a ransom to the malware operators to remove the restriction. Some forms of ransomware systematically encrypt files on the system’s hard drive, which become difficult or impossible to decrypt without paying the ransom for the encryption key, while some may simply lock the system and display messages intended to coax the user into paying. Ransomware typically propagates as a trojan, whose payload is disguised as a seemingly legitimate file.

Beware the Rise of Ransomware

Kim Boatman

http://us.norton.com/yoursecurityresource/detail.jsp?aid=rise_in_ransomware

1 2 3 8