Mindfulness and contemplative practices for educational purposes

Calming the teenage mind in the classroom

Why More Western Doctors Are Now Prescribing Yoga Therapy

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/health/western-doctors-prescribing-yoga-therapy/

More on contemplative practices and mindfulness in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=contemplative&submit=Search

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=mindfulness&submit=Search

10 Dangerous Apps

Parents, If Your Kids Have Any of These 10 Dangerous Apps, It’s Time to Hit “Delete”

Sex educator Megan Maas has the scoop on 10 apps that can be very dangerous for your kids, and what you need to know about them.

http://www.foreverymom.com/parents-kids-10-dangerous-apps-time-hit-delete/

You may be thinking your kids are downloading apps because they are just a simple way for them to keep in contact with their friends. This is certainly true for most kids, but unfortunately, even innocent use of most of these apps can land a kid in a situation he/she never intended to be in. Here are some potentially dangerous apps that are popular among kids:

1. 
Tinder

2. Snapchat: This app allows a user to send photos and videos to anyone on his/her friend list.

3. Blendr: A flirting app used to meet new people through GPS location services.
4. Kik Messenger: An instant messaging app with over 100 million users that allows users to exchange videos, pics and sketches.

5. Whisper: Whisper is an anonymous confession app. It allows users to superimpose text over a picture in order to share their thoughts and feelings anonymously.
6. Ask.fm: Ask.fm is one of the most popular social networking sites that is almost exclusively used by kids.

7. Yik Yak: An app that allows users to post text-only “Yaks” of up to 200 characters.

8. Poof

9. Omegle: This app is primarily used for video chatting. When you use Omegle, you do not identify yourself through the service.

10. Down: This app, which used to be called Bang With Friends, is connected to Facebook

EADH

The European Association for Digital Humanities

http://eadh.org/

More on Digital Humanities in this blog:

Digital Humanities

The Digital Humanities network on Twitter

coding or foreign language

Our opinion: both!

Don’t Swap Coding Classes for Foreign Language

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/dont-swap-coding-classes-foreign-language-igor-perisic

The whole problem is rooted in the abuse of the key term, language. In foreign languages the term language refers to “the system of words or signs that people use to express thoughts and feelings to each other (Merriam-Webster) while in programming languages the term language means “a formal system of signs and symbols including rules for the formation and transformation of admissible expressions (Merriam-Webster). To equate foreign languages with programming languages reduces learning a foreign language to the mere acquisition of a set of tokens or words that are semantically and syntactically glued together. It fundamentally ignores the societal, cultural and historical aspects of human languages.

Should Coding be the “New Foreign Language” Requirement?

disconnect the Russian way

Stalin, Siberia and salt: Russian recluse’s life story made into film

British director to tell the tale of Agafia Lykova, the only remaining member of a family of Old Believers who fled to remote Siberian taiga in 1936

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/12/russia-recluse-siberia-stalin-agafia-lykova-documentary

When I finally met Agafia, what surprised me was that rather than feeling like a primitive situation, it felt like arriving in the future – to a world with no technology, the vast forest littered with discarded space junk. It is an incredible and beautiful place

mobile devices for learning

Like It or Not, Students Love Their Mobile Devices for Learning

Nov 25, 2015 By Ryan Seilhamer

http://blog.canvaslms.com/like-it-or-not-students-love-their-mobile-devices-for-learning

As for learning, our survey indicated that students used smartphones (77 percent) and tablets (79 percent) for academic reasons. When asked how often their instructors required a mobile device, there was a significant drop-off for smartphones (19 percent) and tablets (13 percent). This reveals a missed opportunity for instructors to engage with students in a way that is familiar to them. – See more at: http://blog.canvaslms.com/like-it-or-not-students-love-their-mobile-devices-for-learning#sthash.ztx8ousF.cvgdnuFI.dpuf

Learners and their Learning Process

Bryan Alexander Webinar; Learners and their Learning Process

AAEEBL is very lucky to have Bryan Alexander for our first webinar of 2016.  He is a consultant to the world on how to understand technology and its effects on learning and education.  One of the creators of the MOOC idea — the interactive, social form of MOOC — he is a strong contributor to innovations in education and also a wonderfully engaging speaker.

His topic is “Learners and Their Learning Process.”  He will talk for 20 minutes and then will open the webinar to discussion (audience uses chat; Bryan responds in voice) for the last 30 minutes of the Webinar.  Trent Batson will serve as moderator.

The webinar is free but you must register to attend.

social media and the devaluation of information

Iran’s blogfather: Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are killing the web

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/dec/29/irans-blogfather-facebook-instagram-and-twitter-are-killing-the-web

is it possible that the Iranian government realized the evolution of social media and his respective obsolescence and this is why they freed him prematurely?

Blogs were gold and bloggers were rock stars back in 2008 when I was arrested.

The hyperlink was a way to abandon centralisation – all the links, lines and hierarchies – and replace them with something more distributed, a system of nodes and networks. Since I got out of jail, though, I’ve realised how much the hyperlink has been devalued, almost made obsolete.

Nearly every social network now treats a link as just the same as it treats any other object – the same as a photo, or a piece of text. You’re encouraged to post one single hyperlink and expose it to a quasi-democratic process of liking and plussing and hearting. But links are not objects, they are relations between objects. This objectivisation has stripped hyperlinks of their immense powers.

At the same time, these social networks tend to treat native text and pictures – things that are directly posted to them – with a lot more respect. One photographer friend explained to me how the images he uploads directly to Facebook receive many more likes than when he uploads them elsewhere and shares the link on Facebook.

Some networks, like Twitter, treat hyperlinks a little better. Others are far more paranoid. Instagram – owned by Facebook – doesn’t allow its audiences to leave whatsoever. You can put up a web address alongside your photos, but it won’t go anywhere. Lots of people start their daily online routine in these cul-de-sacs of social media, and their journeys end there. Many don’t even realise they are using the internet’s infrastructure when they like an Instagram photograph or leave a comment on a friend’s Facebook video. It’s just an app.

A most brilliant paragraph by some ordinary-looking person can be left outside the stream, while the silly ramblings of a celebrity gain instant internet presence. And not only do the algorithms behind the stream equate newness and popularity with importance, they also tend to show us more of what we have already liked. These services carefully scan our behaviour and delicately tailor our news feeds with posts, pictures and videos that they think we would most likely want to see.

Today the stream is digital media’s dominant form of organising information. It’s in every social network and mobile application.

The centralisation of information also worries me because it makes it easier for things to disappear.

But the scariest outcome of the centralisation of information in the age of social networks is something else: it is making us all much less powerful in relation to governments and corporations. Surveillance is increasingly imposed on civilised lives, and it gets worse as time goes by. The only way to stay outside of this vast apparatus of surveillance might be to go into a cave and sleep, even if you can’t make it 300 years.

Power, Privacy, and the Internet

http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/gallery/2014/feb/07/power-privacy-and-internet-conference/

  • Governments, Corporations and Hackers: The Internet and Threats to the Privacy and Dignity of the Citizen:

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/126066881/download?secret_token=s-QvmZz&client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c 

  • The Internet and the Future of the Press

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/126066391/download?secret_token=s-v6mpP&client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c

  • The Internet, Repression and Dissent

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/126066389/download?secret_token=s-Udzom&client_id=0f8fdbbaa21a9bd18210986a7dc2d72c

 Merkel calls for separate EU internet

http://www.aljazeera.com/video/europe/2014/02/merkel-calls-separate-eu-internet-201421955226908928.html

http://www.ted.com/talks/edward_snowden_here_s_how_we_take_back_the_internet

The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center (Watch What You Say)

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/

 

 

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/03/surveillance-age-and-librarians/