Teenagers, The Internet, And Privacy

The Truth About Teenagers, The Internet, And Privacy

http://www.fastcompany.com/3037962/then-and-now/the-truth-about-teenagers-the-internet-and-privacy

danah boyd, a professor at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, argues that teenagers closely scrutinize what they share online because it is a way for them to negotiate their changing identities. In her book, It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, she describes how teenagers carefully curate their feeds based on the audience they are trying to reach.

Adolescents have been migrating away from Facebook and Twitter over the last few years, showing preference for sites like Snapchat, Whisper, Kik, and Secret that provide more anonymity and privacy. Part of this transition can be explained by the fact that the older social media sites stopped being cool when parents joined them, but perhaps another reason could be that teenagers growing up in the post-Snowden era implicitly understand the value of anonymity. For teens, it’s not a matter of which platform to use, but rather which works best in a particular context.

WHAT ARE YOU REVEALING ONLINE? MUCH MORE THAN YOU THINK

WHAT ARE YOU REVEALING ONLINE? MUCH MORE THAN YOU THINK

http://ideas.ted.com/2014/07/01/do-you-know-what-youre-revealing-online-much-more-than-you-think/

Right now in the U.S. it’s essentially the case that when you post information online, you give up control of it.

Some companies may give you that right, but you don’t have a natural, legal right to control your personal data. So if a company decides they want to sell it or market it or release it or change your privacy settings, they can do that.

The point is, we really don’t know how this information will be used. For instance, say I’m a merchant — once I get information about you, I can use this information to try to extract more economic surplus from the transaction. I can price-discriminate you, so that I can get more out of the transaction than you will.

I’m interested in working in this area, not because disclosure is bad — human beings disclose all the time, it’s an innate need as much as privacy is — but because we really don’t know how this information will be used in the long run.

Pro Domo Sua: Are We Puppets in a Wired World? Surveillance and privacy revisited…

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/nov/07/are-we-puppets-wired-world/

Are We Puppets in a Wired World?

But while we were having fun, we happily and willingly helped to create the greatest surveillance system ever imagined, a web whose strings give governments and businesses countless threads to pull, which makes us…puppets. The free flow of information over the Internet (except in places where that flow is blocked), which serves us well, may serve others better. Whether this distinction turns out to matter may be the one piece of information the Internet cannot deliver.

 

Against DRM

http://www.defectivebydesign.org/dayagainstdrm

what is DRM:

Digital rights management

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_rights_management

Companies such as Amazon,AT&TAOLApple Inc.Google[1]BBCMicrosoftElectronic Arts, and Sony use digital rights management.

Those opposed to DRM contend there is no evidence that DRM helps prevent copyright infringement, arguing instead that it serves only to inconvenience legitimate customers, and that DRM helps big business stifle innovation and competition.[6] Furthermore, works can become permanently inaccessible if the DRM scheme changes or if the service is discontinued.