Archive of ‘digital storytelling’ category

Oculus Rift and Irish students

How Irish Students Use Oculus Rift VR in the Classroom

https://medium.com/gen-z-pop/how-irish-students-use-oculus-rift-vr-in-the-classroom-f8ef64c1bfb9

Derek E. Baird Oct 11, 2017

Shifts in students’ learning style will prompt a shift to active construction of knowledge through mediated immersion.”-Chris Dede

The theory of constructivist-based learningaccording to Dr. Seymour Papert, “is grounded in the idea that people learn by actively constructing new knowledge, rather than having information ‘poured’ into their heads.”

Moreover, constructionism asserts that people learn with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful artifacts (such as computer programs, animations, 3D modeling, creating spatial environments in virtual reality or building robots).”

Technologies like virtual reality, especially for Gen Z students’, provides avenues that allow them to engage in a social, collaborative, and active learning environment.

Virtual reality, especially when combined with powerful storytelling, allows the student to participate in the story, develop empathy to experiences outside their current realm of understanding and allows them to be fully immersed in their own exploration and learning.

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

storytelling

Craft your story at Now/Next in learning

September 26–28, 2018, Renaissance Nashville Hotel

Nashville, TN

In education, storytelling tools help connect students with curriculum, lead to effective classroom engagement, and drive faculty community-building by empowering educators to connect authentically.

Moth’s Seven Principles of Storytelling: https://www.fastcompany.com/3052152/6-rules-for-great-storytelling-from-a-moth-approved-master-of-the-form 

1: MAKE PEOPLE ROOT FOR YOU
2: HAVE A FEW GO-TO STORIES AT THE READY
3: STORIES ARE ABOUT HOW YOU FELT
4: THIS MAY SEEM OBVIOUS, BUT “Stories have a beginning, middle, and an end
5: GOOD STORIES ARE UNIVERSAL
6: DON’T BE BORING

[PDF] Long Story Short: The Only Storytelling Guide You ll Ever Need Kindle ready from nakaliL3248

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more on storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=storytelling

we teach digital storytelling: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SCSUDigitalStorytelling/

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

Immersive Storytelling and Learning

An Imaginary Interview with Lev Vygotsky on Immersive Storytelling and Learning

Ulla, Founder and CEO of ThingLink

https://medium.com/@ulla/an-imaginary-interview-with-lev-vygotsky-on-immersive-storytelling-and-learning-5bbb211c6e50

digital storytelling at the Festival Della Didattica Digitale (Digital Teaching Festival) in Italy.

the trending but undefined concepts of digital storytelling and immersive learning

definition

Storytelling is a logical form of thought. It is an analytical process including perception, labeling, organizing, categorizing real and imaginary objects and their real and imaginary relations in speech.

Q: What do you think immersive documentation technologies such as 360 images and videos can bring to this process?

V: 360 degree media and virtual reality are cultural-historically developed tools that mediate our relationship to the world in a new way. They expand the possible fields of perception transcending space and time. Perception precedes other psychological functions.

Definition

Immersive storytelling can be understood as an activity through which students use language to visualize relations and meaning in 360 degree digital environments. Naming or describing relations between objects in our field of perception using verbal or visual language awakens intellectual processes fundamental to learning.

Q: Would you say immersive storytelling is a form of creative play?

V: That is a possible interpretation. Play is a psychological process through which we create an imaginary situation or place, reflecting or separating objects and their actual meaning, or creating new meanings. The ability to digitally create and modify situations and environments can be understood as a form of play, opening a realm of spontaneity and freedom, connected with pleasure.

Q: Can robots help us learn? Is AI already the More Knowledgeable Other?

V: The More Knowledgeable Other (MKO) refers to anyone or anything who has a better understanding or a higher ability level than the learner, with respect to a particular task, process, or concept. If a robot with artificial intelligence can function as an MKO and support our problem solving, it can expand our Zone of Proximal Development.

SITE 2019

SITE 2019 Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education

http://site.aace.org/conf/

March 18-22, 2018

Digital Storytelling/Media SIG

http://www.learntechlib.org/search/?q=digital+storytelling

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Games & Simulations SIG

Games & Simulations Papers in LearnTechLib

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Technology Leadership SIG

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Wearable Technology in Education SIG

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K-12 Online Learning SIG

K-12 Online Learning Papers in LearnTechLib (10,000+)

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

digital storytelling tools

Six Good Digital Storytelling Tools In One Place

Six Good Digital Storytelling Tools In One Place

Timeline JS

The same people who created Timeline JS, Knight Lab at Northwestern University, offer five other tools for creating and publishing digital stories.

Juxtapose JS from Knight Lab is a free tool for making and hosting side-by-side comparisons of images. The tool was designed to help people see before and after views of a location, a building, a person, or anything else that changes appearance over time. Juxtapose JS will let you put the images into a slider frame that you can embed into a webpage where viewers can use the slider to reveal more or less of one of the images.

Storyline JS is one of the newer Knight Lab offerings. This beta product is designed to help students tell stories with data. The basic purpose of Storyline JS is to help students can create interactive line graphs. Students add annotations to the data points their line graphs. Those annotations are used to tell the story of the data represented in the graph.

Scene VR is another beta product from Knight Lab. The purpose of Scene VR is to enable users to stitch together panoramic images and VR images to create an immersive photo story. Stories published through Scene VR can be embedded into websites and viewed on desktop computers as well as on tablets and mobile phones.

If you want to embed audio into a written story, Soundcite JS is the tool for you. Soundcite JS lets you add audio clips to a written story. When Soundcite JS is properly used, a play button appears where you specify in the text. For example, if I wrote a story that included a scene in which a dog barks, I could have “the dog barks at the stranger” be highlighted with a play button that when clicked plays the sound of a dog barking.

StoryMap JS lets you combine elements of timelines and maps to create mapped stories. On StoryMap JS you create slides that are matched to locations on your map. Each slide in your story can include images or videos along with text. As you scroll through your story there are simple transitions between each slide. StoryMap JS integrates with your Google Drive account. To get started with StoryMap JS you have to grant it access to your Google Drive account. StoryMap JS will create a folder in your Google Drive account where all of your storymap projects will be saved. With StoryMap JS connected to your Google Drive account you will be able to pull images from your Google Drive account to use in your StoryMap JS projects. Here’s a good tutorial video made by Jan Serie Center’s Digital Liberal Arts initiative at Macalester College.

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

storytelling AR and VR tools

Unleash the Power of Storytelling With These New AR and VR Tools

By Jaime Donally (Columnist)     Apr 4, 2018

Teachers can bring VR stories into the classroom in many different ways for meaningful learning experiences. Imagine a scavenger hunt where students narrate a story based on what they find. Or consider using objects they see to identify vocabulary words or recognize letters. Students should have purpose in their viewing and it should directly connect to standards.

Starting with virtual reality, stories in apps such as Google Spotlight Storiesand YouTube 360 videos have been popular from the start.

Similar to the new movie, Ready Player One, they provide an intense experience where the viewer feels like they are in the center of the story.

Using a mobile device or tablet, the student can start the story and look around the scene based on their interest, rather than the cameras focus. New apps such as Baobab VR have continued to appear with more interactions and engagement.

A creative way to have your students create their own virtual stories is using the app Roundme. Upload your 360 image and add directional sound, links and content. Upload portals to walk the viewer into multiple scenes and then easily share the stories by link to the story.

Newer augmented reality apps that work with ARKit have taken another approach to storytelling.  Augmented Stories and My Hungry Caterpillar.Qurious, a company that is working on a release blending gaming, making and storytelling in one app.

Storyfab, turns our students into the directors of the show

A new AR book, SpyQuest, has moved the immersive experience a big step forward as it helps define the story by bringing the images to life. Through the camera lens on a device, the stories make students the agents in an adventure into the world of espionage. The augmented reality experiences on the images use the accompanying app to scan the scene and provide further insight into the story.

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more on storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

more on VR and storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+storytelling

 

student digital storytellers

Check out our LIB 490/590 Digital Storytelling class: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/ Subscribe: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SCSUDigitalStorytelling/ Share your thoughts and ideas: https://goo.gl/forms/pbtikak6M45YRp0z2

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A Guide to Producing Student Digital Storytellers

By Michael Hernandez     Aug 26, 2015 https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-08-26-a-guide-to-producing-student-digital-storytellers

What is Digital Storytelling?

Digital storytelling uses video, audio, social media, blogging and other tools to convey ideas and information effectively. The emphasis is on empowering students to create authentic products that they can share with others beyond the classroom walls, and to allow for audience interaction and feedback.

why should we inspire students to be digital storytellers?

Requires critical thinking: Creating an interdisciplinary product from scratch requires high level thinking skills like evaluating evidence, editing and curation, and production timelines. Digital stories often use multiple skills like writing, public speaking, photography, design and collaboration in a single project which makes them ideal for practicing skills learned other units or classes.

Authentic projects have impact: Creating real-world, impactful products that students share with an audience beyond the classroom is one of the best ways to enhance motivation and increase quality.

Places focus on writing: A picture is worth a thousand words, and video is 30 photos a second. It has its own grammar and style, but concepts of content, structure, tone and audience impact are just as important in multimedia as they are for an essay. Scripts, voiceovers and interview questions emphasize traditional writing skills and are the backbone of all multimedia projects.

Develops digital citizens: What to post online, when and how are all important questions for our students to learn to answer. Require them to comment on others’ work and develop etiquette for online posts and feedback. Rather than being afraid of the internet, embrace it to teach digital citizenship.

Students can add to digital portfolios: All student work can be compiled into a digital portfolio that they can use to promote themselves for jobs/internships

How to Educate Digital Storytellers

1. Focus on content, not the tools

2. Take it to the next “SAMR level.” The SAMR model is a way to gauge how deeply and effectively you use technology (Salvador Dali)

3. Develop expectations and outcomes

4. Start small

5. Evaluate early on and often

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http://edtechteacher.org/tools/multimedia/digital-storytelling/

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How to Use Digital Storytelling in Your Classroom

Empower student creativity with affordable and accessible technology.

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

student inquiry

Type of Student Inquiry

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/50620/how-to-ease-students-into-independent-inquiry-projects

The excerpt below is from the book “Inquiry Mindsets: Nurturing the Dreams, Wonders, and Curiosities of Our Youngest Learners,” by Trevor MacKenzie with Rebecca Bathurst-Hunt, published by EdTechTeam Press.

student inquiry

Scaffolding is critical to our inquiry journey. Too often teachers enter the inquiry pool in the deep end, heading straight to Free Inquiry

power of provocation

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more on student inquiry in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=student+inquiry

 

data storytelling

3 Reasons Why Data Storytelling Will Be A Top Marketing Trend of 2018

https://martechseries.com/mts-insights/guest-authors/3-reasons-data-storytelling-will-top-marketing-trend-2018/
A study that looked at reader engagement across articles that contained charts and infographics vs. articles that were text-only found that those with graphical storytelling, or what I like to call data storytelling, had up to 34 percent more comments and shares and a 300 percent improvement on the depth of scroll down the page.
Using storytelling techniques to present data not only makes it more visually appealing but also enables easy spotting of key trends, seamless results-tracking, and quick goal-monitoring.

Here are things that can help you build a bridge from your current methods to effective data storytelling–

  • Choose a topic by identifying your target audience, the goal of your visual, what you would like to achieve.
  • Organize your data by thinking about what you want to convey and then get rid of anything that doesn’t help you tell that story.
  • Spend time making your visualization look sharp by keeping it simple, using color and interactivity.

A few bonus tips to make your data visualizations really pop–

  • Don’t use more than two graphs at a time so as not to confuse participants.
  • Stick with one color per graph; making things multicolored will cause data to look jumbled.
  • Give context to your concept. Introduce your idea slowly and tell the story of what you want your data to reveal instead of assuming everyone in the room is on the same page.
  • Try using interactive data storytelling techniques to support your data.
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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

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