Archive of ‘distance learning’ category

master program on cybersecurity

Berkeley Launches Online Master of Information and Cybersecurity

By Joshua Bolkan 11/16/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/16/berkeley-launches-online-master-of-information-and-cybersecurity.aspx

The University of California, Berkeley’s School of Information (I School) has tapped a private partner to help launch a new online program, Master of Information and Cybersecurity (MICS).

Dubbed cybersecurity@berkeley, the new program was developed in collaboration with the university’s Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity and College of Engineering.

The 27-unit course will use 2U’s online learning platform for live, weekly meetings. Between sessions, students will have access to interactive content designed by MICS faculty. Students will also have the opportunity to visit campus to meet faculty and classmates and attend lectures and workshops curated specifically for students in the program.

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

elearning growth based on flipped and mobile learning

Report: Flipped and Mobile Helping to Drive Growing Momentum in E-Learning Content and Courses

By Leila Meyer 11/28/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/28/report-flipped-and-mobile-helping-to-drive-growing-momentum-in-elearning-content-and-courses.aspx

According to the report, one of the main reasons for the growth in generic e-learning content and courses is the adoption of teaching and learning methods such as the flipped classroom, blended learning and virtual classrooms

The report identifies the proliferation of mobile devices on campus as the third factor helping to drive adoption of these courses. “The availability of gadgets such as e-book readers, tablets, and laptops, coupled with better and uninterrupted Internet connectivity, has led to a greater penetration of digital classrooms and e-learning products,”

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more on elearning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=elearning

pedagogical research elearning

What Does Recent Pedagogical Research Tell Us About eLearning Good Practice?

Many instructors indicate that they want their elearning teaching approaches to be evidence-based. Indeed, there are rich and varied sources of research being conducted on elearning good practices available in scholarly journals and government reports. However, few of us have time to keep up with these publications. In this session Christina Petersen will do some of that work for you. She summarize findings from recent government and university reports which review over 1,000 online learning studies. Additionally, she will summarize the findings from newly published articles from pedagogical journals with important information about good practices in online education. These practices address evidence-based methods for promoting student engagement in online courses, good practices for video production, and other topics related to online teaching. We will discuss the importance of all of these findings for your teaching.

Christina Petersen is an Education Program Specialist in the Center for Educational Innovation at the University of Minnesota where she partners with faculty and departments to help create and redesign courses and curriculum to promote maximal student learning. She facilitates a monthly Pedagogical Innovations Journal Club at the CEI. She has a PhD in Pharmacology and her teaching experience includes undergraduate courses in Pharmacology, and graduate courses in Higher Education pedagogy. Her teaching interests include integrating active learning into science courses, teaching in active learning classrooms, and evidence-based teaching practice. She is co-author of a soon-to-be-released book from Stylus, “A Guide to Teaching in Active Learning Classrooms”

View the eLearning Summit presentation

WebEx link for the webinar
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2016
Time: 2:00 p.m., Central Daylight Time (Chicago, GMT-05:00)
Session number: 805 333 130
Session Password: MNLC@2016

Teleconference information

To receive a call back, provide your phone number when you join the training session. Alternatively, you can call one of the following numbers and enter the access code:

Call-in toll-free number: 888-742-5095
(US) Call-in number: 619-377-3319
(US) Conference Code: 297 345 8873
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more on elearning in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=elearning

technology use among teachers

Technology Use Among Teachers Strong and Growing

By David Nagel 11/17/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/17/technology-use-among-teachers-strong-and-growing.aspx

The study, conducted by adaptive learning provider Front Row Education, found that 75 percent of teachers use technology with students on a daily basis and that a bit more than half have a 1-to-1 ratio of devices to students in their classrooms (up 10 points from last year’s survey). That increase in student devices is helping to drive an increase in the use of technology, with about 60 percent of teachers surveyed saying they expect to increase the use of technology in the 2016–2017 school year.

60 percent of teachers have access to Chromebooks, up 15 percent from last year; 64 percent have access to iPads, down 5 percent from last year. iPads tend to be the tool of choice in lower grades (75 percent in K–2), while Chromebooks dominate the middle school years (66 percent). Interestingly,

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more on technology use among teachers in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+teachers

student evals online courses

Discussion on the EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Group’s listserv

Question:

develop anonymous mid-course student evaluations allowing students to reflect on course and progress and informing instructor about what is working or not in the course.

Answers:

– what is working well for you in the course?
– what is not working well for you in the course?

krajewsk@AUGSBURG.EDU

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  • What is helping you learn?
  • What is hindering your learning?
  • What suggestions do you have to make the course better for you, your peers, or the instructor?

Katie Linder Research Director Extended Campus, Oregon State University 4943 The Valley Library Corvallis, Oregon 97331  Phone 541-737-4629 | Fax 541-737-2734 Email: kathryn.linder@oregonstate.edu

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At the University of Illinois, we have been using Informal Early Feedback as a way to gauge information from our students to help improve the courses before the end.  Here are a couple of links to our site. The first is the main page on what IEF is and the second is the question bank we offer to faculty. This is a starting point for them, then we meet with those who want to work on tweaking them for their specific needs.

* About IEF: https://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/measurement-evaluation/teaching-evaluation/ief

* Question Bank: https://citl.illinois.edu/citl-101/measurement-evaluation/teaching-evaluation/ief/ief-question-bank

If you have any questions at all, don’t hesitate to ask.

Sol Roberts-Lieb Associate Director, Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning Pedagogy Strategy Team and Industry Liaison UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

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more on student evaluations in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=student+evaluation

research on blended learning

Discussion on the EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Group’s listserv

Question:\

I head an instructional design unit and we’ve been noticing that instructors with no experience in online teaching seem to struggle to teach in a blended environment. They get easily confused about 1) how to decide what content is best suited for in class and what goes online and 2) they also have difficulty bridging the two modalities to create a seamless and rich learning environment.

Rema Nilakanta, Ph.D., Director of Design and Delivery   Engineering-LAS Online Learning 1328 Howe Hall 537 Bissell Rd  P      515-294-9259        F      515-294-6184        W     http://www.elo.iastate.edu 

Answers:

Oregon State University has a hybrid course design program that is a partnership between OSU’s Ecampus and our Center for Teaching and Learning. You can find quite a few resources here: http://ctl.oregonstate.edu/hybrid-learning

Shannon Riggs Director, Course Development and Training Oregon State University Ecampus 4943 Valley Library Corvallis, OR 97331-4504 541.737.2613

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http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/consult/olc-quality-scorecard-blended-learning-programs/

Jennifer Mathes, Ph.D. Director of Strategic Partnerships Online Learning Consortium Office: (781) 583-7571 Mobile: (913) 226-4977 Email:  jennifer.mathes@onlinelearning-c.org Website:  http://www.onlinelearning-c.org Skype:     mathes.olc

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You might find my recent book The Blended Course Design Workbook: A Practical Guide to be a helpful resource. Each chapter has a literature review of the relevant research as well as activities to guide faculty through the various components of blended course design. You can read the first chapter on the fundamentals of blended teaching and learning at the publisher website. The book also has a companion website with additional resources here: http://www.bcdworkbook.com.

Katie Linder Research Director Extended Campus, Oregon State University 4943 The Valley Library Corvallis, Oregon 97331  Phone 541-737-4629 | Fax 541-737-2734 Email: kathryn.linder@oregonstate.edu Twitter: @ECResearchUnit & @RIA_podcast Check out the Research in Action podcast: ecampus.oregonstate.edu/podcast

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more on blended learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+learning

Google Hangout Whiteboard

How to Use a Whiteboard in Google+ Hangouts

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/11/how-to-use-whiteboard-in-google-hangouts.html

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More on Google Hangouts in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=google+hangout

video for social media

these tools useful for hybrid and online learning

By October 19, 2016

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/3-video-storytelling-tools-for-social-marketers/

Adobe Spark

Adobe Spark Video is an elegant, easy-to-use tool for creating animated videos that tell a story. It’s available as a browser-based cloud app or as an iOS app. You can get it as a single app or install the 3-in-1 tool to access the Spark Post and Spark Page companion apps too.

What’s great about Spark Video is that it’s quick. You can create a compelling animated video story in just minutes without any design experience, and work on your project from anywhere. As a cloud-based tool, your progress is saved and synced automatically, so you can work on it on mobile or desktop whenever creative inspiration strikes.

Animoto

Now let’s look at a tool that’s similar to Adobe Spark, but gives you more flexibility over your content. Animoto is an affordable, cloud-based tool that offers an assortment of choices and customizations to create a one-of-a-kind video to tell your brand’s story.

This tool gives you a little more control than Adobe Spark Video. You can start with a blank canvas (choosing your own colors, styles, and frames to more closely match your brand) or adapt one of the tool’s wide variety of templates.

YouTube Director

YouTube Director is a revolutionary tool to create video ads for business. Geared toward small local businesses, it’s a foolproof way to tell a compelling story in a short format.

As you follow the prompts, you’re guided to capture images, video, and voiceovers. Then you can post the video and run a video ad campaign on YouTube.

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more on video and social media in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+video

storyboard in course authoring

Storyboarding: A Simple Way To Get Professional In Course Authoring

Storyboarding: A Simple Way To Get Professional In Course Authoring

7 Tip To Get Started With Storyboarding

  1. Pick the tool you will be using for creating storyboards (MS Office tools: Word, Excel, PPT).
  2. Create a sketch of the title page with the name of the course and 3-5 page mockups containing the course sets out to accomplish, e.g.
    1. What Ιs Gamification?
    2. Game Thinking.
    3. Game Elements.
    4. Motivation & Psychology.
    5. Gamification Design Framework.
  3. After you have outlined the principal structure of the course, it’s time to go deeper and describe the structure of every section of the course.
  4. Try to visualize the general layout of every page.
  5. Enumerate all screens in the storyboard, e.g. 1/16, 2/16, 3/16, and so on.
  6. Lay out the screens of your storyboard in order and try following the story they tell. Look at them through your learners’ eyes. Is all information delivered in a logical order? Did you leave out something important? Are your notes clear enough so that you will be able to build a complete course using your storyboard for reference a week later? Have you touched upon all important areas?
  7. If you need to present your storyboard to your client (student) or boss (student) for review, it pays to show it to a good friend first and ask for feedback. Ask them to read your storyboard and then retell what they took away from it in their own words.

in Geenio (https://www.geen.io/) this mode is called the Pathboard, and entering it allows you to see the structure of your whole course, the sequence in which pages and tests are presented, as well as the connections between them. Some course editors not only provide you an overview of your course’s structure, but enable you to edit the course’s structure and add additional elements to it as well.

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More on storyboard importance for your hybrid/online course design
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online learning and course design

Five tips for designing an online course:

  1. State your objective: Each lesson should have one concise, action-oriented learning objective to ensure your lesson design process is focused.
  2. Think as a private tutor: Learners today are inundated with media tailored to them and they expect learning to be tailored as well. So think about how the tools available, including new technologies, will help create meaningful learning moments for all your students.
  3. Storyboard before you build: Being able to see a complete lesson, especially one that integrates various mediums, is essential to creating a successful learning experience.
  4. Build towards high-order thinking: Technology in education can go beyond multiple-choice questions and document repositories. Don’t be afraid to integrate tools that let learners create and share.
  5. Remember you’re learning too: Reviewing learner results from a lesson shouldn’t just be about their score, but also evaluating how effectively the lesson was developed and executed so your teaching can adapt and learn as well.

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/04/06/guide-to-project-based-learning/

tools for iOS, Android etc.

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elearning infographics

 

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/20/how-to-gamify-your-classroom-in-6-easy-steps/

  • Clarify your desired learning outcomes first
  • Make them measurable
  • Choose a ‘big idea’
  • Storyboard the game. Make sure there’s room for failure and multiple courses of action.
  • Design learning activities
  • Build teams
  • THEN apply the game dynamics

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Videos In Your Classroom

 

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