Archive of ‘distributive learning’ category

OLC Collaborate

OLC Collaborate

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/attend-2019/innovate/

schedule:

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/attend-2019/innovate/program/all_sessions/#streamed

Wednesday

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THE NEW PROFESSOR: HOW I PODCASTED MY WAY INTO STUDENTS’ LIVES (AND HOW YOU CAN, TOO)

Concurrent Session 1

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/olc-innovate-2019-session-page/?session=6734&kwds=

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Creating A Cost-Free Course

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Idea Hose: AI Design For People
Date: Wednesday, April 3rd
Time: 3:30 PM to 4:15 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 3
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Brian Kane (General Design LLC)
Track: Research: Designs, Methods, and Findings
Location: Juniper A
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:What happens when you apply design thinking to AI? AI presents a fundamental change in the way people interact with machines. By applying design thinking to the way AI is made and used, we can generate an unlimited amount of new ideas for products and experiences that people will love and use.https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/olc-innovate-2019-session-page/?session=6964&kwds=
Notes from the session:
design thinking: get out from old mental models.  new narratives; get out of the sci fi movies.
narrative generators: AI design for people stream
we need machines to make mistakes. Ai even more then traditional software.
Lessons learned: don’t replace people
creativity engines – automated creativity.
trends:
 AI Design for People stream49 PM-us9swehttps://www.androidauthority.com/nvidia-jetson-nano-966609/
https://community.infiniteflight.com/t/virtualhub-ios-and-android-free/142837?u=sudafly
 http://bit.ly/VirtualHub
Thursday
Chatbots, Game Theory, And AI: Adapting Learning For Humans, Or Innovating Humans Out Of The Picture?
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 8:45 AM to 9:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 4
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Matt Crosslin (University of Texas at Arlington LINK Research Lab)
Track: Experiential and Life-Long Learning
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:How can teachers utilize chatbots and artificial intelligence in ways that won’t remove humans out of the education picture? Using tools like Twine and Recast.AI chatobts, this session will focus on how to build adaptive content that allows learners to create their own heutagogical educational pathways based on individual needs.++++++++++++++++

This Is Us: Fostering Effective Storytelling Through EdTech & Student’s Influence As Digital Citizens
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 9:45 AM to 10:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 5
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Maikel Alendy (FIU Online)
Co-presenter: Sky V. King (FIU Online – Florida International University)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:“This is Us” demonstrates how leveraging storytelling in learning engages students to effectively communicate their authentic story, transitioning from consumerism to become creators and influencers. Addressing responsibility as a digital citizen, information and digital literacy, online privacy, and strategies with examples using several edtech tools, will be reviewed.++++++++++++++++++

Personalized Learning At Scale: Using Adaptive Tools & Digital Assistants
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 6
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Kristin Bushong (Arizona State University )
Co-presenter: Heather Nebrich (Arizona State University)
Track: Effective Tools, Toys and Technologies
Location: Juniper C
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:Considering today’s overstimulated lifestyle, how do we engage busy learners to stay on task? Join this session to discover current efforts in implementing ubiquitous educational opportunities through customized interests and personalized learning aspirations e.g., adaptive math tools, AI support communities, and memory management systems.+++++++++++++

High-Impact Practices Online: Starting The Conversation
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 1:15 PM to 2:00 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 7
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Katie Linder (Oregon State University)
Co-presenter: June Griffin (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:The concept of High-impact Educational Practices (HIPs) is well-known, but the conversation about transitioning HIPs online is new. In this session, contributors from the edited collection High-Impact Practices in Online Education will share current HIP research, and offer ideas for participants to reflect on regarding implementing HIPs into online environments.https://www.aacu.org/leap/hipshttps://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/LEAP/HIP_tables.pdf+++++++++++++++++++++++

Human Skills For Digital Natives: Expanding Our Definition Of Tech And Media Literacy
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Manoush Zomorodi (Stable Genius Productions)
Track: N/A
Location: Adams Ballroom
Session Duration: 1hr 15min
Brief Abstract:How can we ensure that students and educators thrive in increasingly digital environments, where change is the only constant? In this keynote, author and journalist Manoush Zomorodi shares her pioneering approach to researching the effects of technology on our behavior. Her unique brand of journalism includes deep-dive investigations into such timely topics as personal privacy, information overload, and the Attention Economy. These interactive multi-media experiments with tens of thousands of podcast listeners will inspire you to think creatively about how we use technology to educate and grow communities.Friday

Anger Is An Energy
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Michael Caulfield (Washington State University-Vancouver)
Track: N/A
Location: Adams Ballroom
Position: 2
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:Years ago, John Lyndon (then Johnny Rotten) sang that “anger is an energy.” And he was right, of course. Anger isn’t an emotion, like happiness or sadness. It’s a reaction, a swelling up of a confused urge. I’m a person profoundly uncomfortable with anger, but yet I’ve found in my professional career that often my most impactful work begins in a place of anger: anger against injustice, inequality, lies, or corruption. And often it is that anger that gives me the energy and endurance to make a difference, to move the mountains that need to be moved. In this talk I want to think through our uneasy relationship with anger; how it can be helpful, and how it can destroy us if we’re not careful.++++++++++++++++

Improving Online Teaching Practice, Creating Community And Sharing Resources
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 10:45 AM to 11:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 10
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Laurie Daily (Augustana University)
Co-presenter: Sharon Gray (Augustana University)
Track: Problems, Processes, and Practices
Location: Juniper A
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:The purpose of this session is to explore the implementation of a Community of Practice to support professional development, enhance online course and program development efforts, and to foster community and engagement between and among full and part time faculty.+++++++++++++++

It’s Not What You Teach, It’s HOW You Teach: A Story-Driven Approach To Course Design
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 11:45 AM to 12:30 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 11
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Katrina Rainer (Strayer University)
Co-presenter: Jennifer M McVay-Dyche (Strayer University)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 2-3
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:Learning is more effective and organic when we teach through the art of storytelling. At Strayer University, we are blending the principles story-driven learning with research-based instructional design practices to create engaging learning experiences. This session will provide you with strategies to strategically infuse stories into any lesson, course, or curriculum.

shifting reality of the online landscape

State Systems Plot Major Online Growth

Public universities across the country are adjusting to the shifting reality of the online landscape. Despite similar goals, approaches vary widely.

Mark Lieberman March 20, 2019

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/03/20/how-public-university-systems-missouri-louisiana-and-more-plan

interviewed administrators at systems across the United States for a wide look at how the landscape is shifting.

The University of Missouri System last year signaled plans to increase its total enrollment from 75,000 to 100,000 by 2023. Administrators pointed to online education as a key driver of future growth.

In other ways, the Missouri system’s approach could look similar to Massachusetts’. Administrators in Missouri are pondering the creation of a separate entity within the system that would offer online programs to adult learners.

Administrators have ruled out purchasing or merging with an existing online apparatus, as Purdue University did with the for-profit Kaplan University to enrollment-expanding but controversial effect.

Senior administrators and board members at Louisiana State University began looking at online education in the early 2010s.

From 2016 to 2018, Sasha Thackaberry served as assistant vice president of academic technology, course production and alternative learning models at Southern New Hampshire University. Louisiana State hired her in February 2018 to lead its online growth; three months later, she was promoted from associate vice provost to vice provost of digital and continuing education.

When Kristina Johnson became chancellor of the State University of New York system in 2017, she challenged administrators to consider a wide range of possibilities for growing online capabilities. According to Tod Laursen, SUNY’s senior vice chancellor and provost, the system has just wrapped up an information-gathering process that will inform a soon-to-be-released request for proposals. Johnson has slated for this fall a major online learning initiative, the details of which are still being ironed out.

Colorado State University Online serves as an online program manager for the state system — distinct from Colorado State University Global, which has a separate faculty and governance structure, and tends to serve adults at an average age in their 30s. CSU Online, by contrast, tends to serve “less seasoned” students between 24 and 34 years old, according to Amy Smith, senior director of CSU Online.

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more on online education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

Weakest students online college classes

Weakest students more likely to take online college classes but do worse in them

Survey of rigorous academic research on online education finds lower grades and higher drop out rates Column by  February 4, 2019

online share of total enrollment

According to the most recent federal statistics from 2016, roughly one out of every three or 6.3 million college students learned online. That number is growing even as fewer people are going to college.

The paper, “Does Online Education Live Up to Its Promise? A Look at the Evidence and Implications for Federal Policy,” was also written by Sandy Baum, an economist at the Urban Institute, a nonprofit research organization.

Online degrees are also concentrated among a handful of nonprofit universities. Just three — Western Governors University, Liberty University and Southern New Hampshire University — enroll about a third of all online students at private, nonprofit institutions.

overwhelming research evidence that community college students aren’t faring well in online classes

Another 2017 study of students at a for-profit university which offers both in-person and online classes found that students who took an online class not only got lower grades in that class but also in future classes. Online students were more likely to drop out of college altogether than similar students who attended in-person classes.

There are much stronger results for courses that combine supplemental materials online with traditional, face-to-face instruction. But the authors do not consider this hybrid instruction to be “online” learning.

Engagement in Online Schools

Does Presence Equal Progress? Tracking Engagement in Online Schools

By Steven Guttentag     Sep 25, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-09-25-does-presence-equal-progress-tracking-engagement-in-online-schools

Embracing online school requires a new mindset, as well as new criteria for measuring academic success—measures that take into account the nature of teaching and learning online, the types of students online schools serve, and the unique ways in which those students learn.

Teachers interact with students during synchronous learning sessions, and they connect one-on-one through calls, online chats, texts, and interactive whiteboard sessions.

Accountability measures must adapt to and reflect a self-paced, competency-based learning environment. A traditional one-size-fits-all rubric does not translate cleanly with respect to online schools.

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more on online engagement in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+engagement

Interested in Teaching Online

Interested in Teaching Online?

This course is designed to introduce you to teaching online – the concepts, competencies, pedagogies, and practices that are required to plan, develop, and teach an online course. Along with introducing you to these key topics, this course will showcase the perspectives of students, faculty, and instructional designers who have a wide range of experience teaching and learning online.

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

Badges and faculty development

Creating Digital Badges to Incentivize Participation in Faculty Development

November 7, 2018 | 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Creating Digital Badges to Incentivize Participation in Faculty Development

Badges are more than just participation trophies. Design them to commensurately represent the knowledge and skills gained.

While many institutions have used digital badges as an alternative way to recognize the skills and knowledge developed by students, some are also starting to use this approach in their in-house professional development programs – especially in faculty development programs.

By offering well-designed badges that accompany these programs, you can boost both participation and impact. Join us for this online training and learn how to design your badges to encourage deeper engagement that goes beyond “showing up”. Our instructor, Lindsay Doukopoulos, will share best practices for badging criteria at Auburn University, where 82% of participants chose to earn badges at annual professional development workshops.

indsay Doukopoulos Ph.D.

Assistant Director, Biggio Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Auburn University

Lindsay’s teaching expertise includes experiential, active, and team-based learning in small and large lecture formats. Her research interests include instructional technologies and the use of digital artifacts (e.g., badging, ePortfolios, etc.) to assess and enhance integrated learning, gameful learning, and metacognition for students and faculty.

After a brief overview of our instructor’s faculty development badging program, we’ll walk through several badges Auburn has implemented for faculty.  For each badge collection, we’ll address the following:

  1. How was it designed, and what elements were considered in the design process?
  2. What are the criteria for earning the badges?  Why?
  3. Who has earned the badges to date?
  4. What impact did badge earners self-report?
  5. What kind of data or artifacts did faculty submit to earn this badge / badge constellation?  What did these show about how faculty were using what they learned?

We’ll close with a brief exercise that will let you start designing your own badge criteria for a program on your campus.

$525 through Oct 31$600

Live Webcast + Recording

  • Access to the live webcast: Invite your team!
  • Links to all presentation materials and resources
  • Permanent recording of the live webcast

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Connecting Credentials to Teaching: Badges and Faculty Development from James Willis, III

2015 nmc-presentation from txwescetl

Badges from The Sophisticated User

Making Faculty Training More Agile with Blackboard Badges from Kaitlin Walsh

Soft Skill Development Using Open Badges from Dan Randall

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

Oculus Rift and Irish students

How Irish Students Use Oculus Rift VR in the Classroom

https://medium.com/gen-z-pop/how-irish-students-use-oculus-rift-vr-in-the-classroom-f8ef64c1bfb9

Derek E. Baird Oct 11, 2017

Shifts in students’ learning style will prompt a shift to active construction of knowledge through mediated immersion.”-Chris Dede

The theory of constructivist-based learningaccording to Dr. Seymour Papert, “is grounded in the idea that people learn by actively constructing new knowledge, rather than having information ‘poured’ into their heads.”

Moreover, constructionism asserts that people learn with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful artifacts (such as computer programs, animations, 3D modeling, creating spatial environments in virtual reality or building robots).”

Technologies like virtual reality, especially for Gen Z students’, provides avenues that allow them to engage in a social, collaborative, and active learning environment.

Virtual reality, especially when combined with powerful storytelling, allows the student to participate in the story, develop empathy to experiences outside their current realm of understanding and allows them to be fully immersed in their own exploration and learning.

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

MOOC and online learning discussion

Bryan Alexander’s Future Trends Forum

Thursday, October 4th, at 2:00 PM ET
Special Guest:
Anant Agarwal, CEO and founder of edX as well as Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT
This Week’s Topic:
An interactive discussion on MOOCs, online learning, and the goal of 100 million learners by 2022
The Future Trends Forum welcomes
Anant Agarwal , the founder and CEO of edX, a non-profit venture created by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, focused on transforming online and on-campus learning through groundbreaking methodologies.
He aims to help bring quality education to everyone, everywhere. Anant has also been a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT for 30 years.

register: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fr20.rs6.net%2Ftn.jsp%3Ff%3D001PgetuutFAOolFnliDMeMmErN-enK2gL_yjiPr06Xh7efV0AVvMGKlpU8dfbBxJhBP_uc98IVJgJlsZDRjzWS9b4vPEEtrEhlBX281rdxsV-7fespDLmne7JWfR3n1iFffb-CEy9EvixERnOfzEfixk7rn6G3bwuvzCtRtyyHU-h0woglE1tLOQ%3D%3D%26c%3D3Q4OLdux-1PVXXKEZKF8fyf8cwMV8MUcmStG2pRDxgswHEo2OG9aVQ%3D%3D%26ch%3DA7IVs0tirxv4LKmg8KVx05x70YdR0QKXYu9MnQHCYyOu-vwaHIJWKQ%3D%3D&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7C1baa122241b0415403d508d628723d79%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=LjOA9M76larAmw%2BYg0vPn69CvQB2fC91hLOXkDW43XQ%3D&reserved=0

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more on MOOC in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mooc

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