Archive of ‘distributive learning’ category

students in VR

XR Storytellers: Learners Making Immersive Stories

LIVE NOW
Thursday, May 7, 2020 from 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM (CDT)

PRESENTATION
Our team will share lessons learned in collaborating to create immersive experiences that accelerate STEM education. Find out how students achieve classroom learning objectives by designing AR experiences. Watch a demonstration of how an immersive scientific story is co-created by students and teachers in a virtual learning environment. Explore novel techniques for supporting learners to demonstrate understanding and share knowledge using spatial technologies and storytelling principles. We invite guests to share their questions and perspectives on the possibilities and limitations of XR storytelling to facilitate relational connections to curriculum and instruction.

PRESENTERS:
Sarah Cassidy | Janelle LaVoie | Quincy Wang | Poh Tan
We are a team of VR learners from the University of Saskatchewan and Simon Fraser University in Canada. Our research explores innovative uses of immersive technology for STEM education and pro-social change.


MENTOR: Paula MacDowell
University of Saskatchewan, Assistant Professor
Website
LinkedIN
Twitter: paulamacdowell
Facebook Discord: Paulie#8830

https://internal.altvr.com/events/1460721187360342083

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https://www.everestvirtualreality.com/

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more on students in VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=students+in+vr

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN AN AGE OF ONLINE LEARNING

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN AN AGE OF ONLINE LEARNING

http://libjournal.uncg.edu/ijcp/article/view/1055/892?fbclid=IwAR3SHDRFlxTbj7lMAuVJ_BsO3wLQaYEcEXEukUPQVXDDOqEnHg_XT9VJ1SE

Paulo Freire and Critical Pedagogy

Freire’s pedagogical concepts, such as problem posing, dialogue, praxis, conscientiazation and the politics of education, were devel-oped in a pre-Internet era. His work in popular education was deeply interpersonal and involved spending significant time in a community becoming familiar with the culture, linguistic patterns, and lifestyle of the people before ever embarking on teaching.

struggles to employ a critical pedagogy in the increasingly assessment-oriented, outcomes-based environment

While designed to make teaching in the online environment more efficient, these systems confront the critical pedagogue with challenges to create a teaching-learning environment that promotes critical reflection not only on the content of a course but on the very way in which content is delivered.

teaching in cyberspace requires a different teaching paradigm altogether

p. 170 Feenberg (2009) developed the Critical Theory of Technology (CTT),

p. 171 As outlined by CTT, technology creates a cyber culture that redefines human identity and the meaning and means of human interaction (Gomez, 2009). When viewed through this lens, online education is not simply another tool for the promotion of learning, but rather an all-encompassing environment managing and controlling access to information, structuring relationships, and redefining individual identities.

p. 171 While masquerading as efforts to enhance student learning, these industries are clearly profit-oriented. Knowledge has become a commodity, students have become consumers, faculty have become content providers, and schools operate as businesses

p. 172 Like Feenberg (2009), Freire would be concerned with the values and principles embedded in the technology of online learning, as well as the cyber culture it has created.

p. 173 Schools did not venture into online learning because they thought it was a better way to teach, but rather because they saw it as a way to reach unreached student populations with the promise of off-site educational offerings. Only later was attention given to developing online pedagogies.

Whereas education in the United States was originally viewed as a way to prepare students for effective citizenship, now it is seen as a way to develop loyal and capable employees of their corporate overlords

p. 174 A second area of concern is the banking nature of the LMSs. One of the underlying assumptions of an LMS like Blackboard™, Moodle™, or Brightspace™ is that the online platform is a repository of resources for teaching and learning.

Freire vehemently rejected this banking approach to education because it did not recognize or encourage the student’s creative, exploratory, and critical abilities. In the banking model the teacher is regarded as the holder and transmitter of knowledge, which is then imparted to the student. The banking model assumes the student is an empty vessel and does not value or recognize the student’s experiential and cultural knowledge

By contrast Freire argued for a problem-posing, constructivist approach that invites students to critically engage their world and one another. In the critical classroom, the student at times takes on the role of teacher and the teacher becomes a learner, inviting a sharing of power and mutual learning. While this approach can be carried out to an extent online, the LMS is set up to be the primary source of information in a course, and the teacher is assigned as the expert designer of the learning experience, thus limiting the constructivist nature and mutuality of the learning process.

p. 175 A third area of concern is the limited access to online learning to large sectors of society. While e-learning advocates tout the greater access to learning provided by online learning (Goral, 2013; Kashi & Conway, 2010), the digital divide is a reality impacting millions of students.

p. 176 A final area of concern is the disembodied nature of the online learning process. One of the major attractions of online learning to potential students is the freedom from having to be in a classroom in a particular time or place.

p. 177 Embodied learning means students must not only engage the cognitive dimension (thinking and reflection), but also partake in concrete action. This action in reflection, and reflection in action, referred to as praxis, involves acting on and in the world as one is seeking to learn about and transform the world.
To limit education to the transmission and reception of text-based knowledge without action undermines the entire learning process (Escobar et al., 1994).
Freire believed dialogue begins not with what the teacher professes to know, but with the student’s experience and knowledge.

p. 179 For Freire, the building of a learning community is essential to creating meaningful dialogue; this is also true for those who seek to teach effectively online. Palloff and Pratt (2007) contend that all online teaching must begin with building community and stress that a carefully constructed online learning community provides a space for students to test ideas, get feedback, and create a collaborative learning experience.
For Freire, learning was a social and democratic event where authoritarianism and control of the learning process are minimized.
“reading the world,” or conscientization, that is, understanding the larger political context in which experience occurs and knowledge is situated. In the current era of Facebook, Twitter, instant message, and other social media, in-depth discussion and analysis is often absent in favor of brief, often innocuous statements and personal opinions.
Through online academic databases, students have easy access to far more sources of information than previous generations. Furthermore, search engines like Google, Yahoo, and the like bring students in contact with remote sources, organizations, and individuals instantly.

p. 180 the challenge is not only the accessing of information, but also encouraging students to become discerning purveyors of information—to develop “critical digital literacy,” the capacity to effectively and critically navigate the databases and myriads of potential sources (Poore, 2011, p. 15)

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

Quality Matters and Online Delivery

from the Higher Ed Learning Collective
https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/572361140061255/

My institution is offering to pay for the Quality Matters course “Teaching Online-An Introduction to Online Delivery.” I’m registered for a session this summer. Have any of you taken taken it? What are your thoughts?

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

art and immersive teaching

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more on art and immersive teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=art+immersive

solving problems with AR

Solving Problems in Local, Global and Digital Communities using AR

Join from a PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device:

Please click this URL to join. https://us02web.zoom.us/w/82299762388?tk=JUpHu5mPpNcXt48wcOT70ff9P28x0Xr-xsSJ9DqpsAU.DQIAAAATKXK21BZVcUgyQ0RzNVNGR0dEM01wZldWaU1nAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA&pwd=dTR2WklBWVM4TmNjT3FSYnJBaHdYdz09&uuid=WN_M30zQ5fPTE6qHmmKSgCN4g

Password: 775958

Description: Join Marialice and Jaime as they join GlobalMindED to present, Solving Problems in Local, Global, and Digital Communities in AR. During their webinar, they will Identify and solve real problems in local, global and digital communities using augmented reality. Participants will gain a better understanding of how digital citizens can confidently and positively engage with emerging technologies to think critically and act creatively. Examples of students using the global goals to make a positive impact on society will be shared.

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more on Virbela in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virbela
more on virtual worlds in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+worlds

Mozilla Hubs VR

ARVRinEDU

https://www.arvrinedu.com/post/day-8-mozilla-hub

Live Zoom orientation tour with Jaime Donally (ISTE presenter). https://www.arvrinedu.com/

“ultimatelly, it is a meeting space for the students to connect among each other and connect with us”

mostly K12 questions

it is free, but the HubsCloud (enterprise option). Regular Hub is up to 25 people.

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more on Virbela in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virbela
more on virtual worlds in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+worlds

does this semester alter college

Will this semester forever alter college? No, but some virtual tools will stick around

when we talk about online education is using digital technologies to transform the learning experience,” said Vijay Govindarajan, a professor at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business. “That is not what is happening right now. What is happening now is we had eight days to put everything we do in class onto Zoom.”

Conceiving, planning, designing and developing a genuine online course or program can consume as much as a year of faculty training and collaboration with instructional designers, and often requires student orientation and support and a complex technological infrastructure.

More than 75 percent [of undergraduate students ] said they don’t think they’re receiving a quality learning experience, according to a survey of nearly 1,300 students by the online exam-prep provider OneClass. In a separate poll of 14,000 college and graduate students in early April by the website niche.com, which rates schools and colleges, 67 percent said they didn’t find online classes as effective as in-person ones.

if there’s a silver lining in this situation for residential colleges and universities, it’s that students no longer take for granted the everyday realities of campus life: low-tech face-to-face classes, cultural diversions, libraries, athletics, extracurricular activities, in-person office hours and social interaction with their classmates.

Online higher education “is a thin diet for the typical 18-year-old,” said Richard Garrett, chief research officer at Eduventures. “But today’s 18-year-olds are tomorrow’s 28-year-olds with families and jobs, who then realize that online can be useful.”

Along with their students, faculty were “thrown into the deep end of the pool for digital learning and asked to swim,” Moe said. “Some will sink, some will crawl to the edge of the pool and climb out and they’ll never go back in the pool ever again. But many will figure out what to do and how to kick and how to stay afloat.”

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more on online education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+education

more on emergency teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=emergency+teaching

Magic Leap 2 new strategy

https://www.forbes.com/sites/charliefink/2019/12/10/magic-leap-drops-news-bombs-about-enterprise-updates-and-magic-leap-2/#16748d961263

Physical screens must go. Their days are numbered.”

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more on Magic Leap in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=magic+leap

Faculty Learn New Teaching Methods

Survey: Emergency Move Online Forced More than Half of Faculty to Learn New Teaching Methods

Rhea Kelly 04/22/20

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/04/22/survey-emergency-move-online-forced-more-than-half-of-faculty-to-learn-new-teaching-methods.aspx

56 percent of faculty who moved courses online were using teaching methods they had never used before. That’s according to “Digital Learning Pulse Survey: Immediate Priorities,” a study conducted by Bay View Analytics

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Free and Discounted Ed Tech Tools for Online Learning During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Dian Schaffhauser  03/16/20

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/03/16/free-and-discounted-ed-tech-tools-for-online-learning-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic.aspx

here some examples from a long list of free services:

Addigy, a cloud-based Apple device management platform, has announced free 60-day access for colleges and universities. The program helps organizations deploy, manage, and track new and existing Apple devices from a single console; automate IT tasks and implement IT policies related to deploying software, updating security settings, running scripts, managing groups of users, and distributing and updating software; and troubleshoot problems for users remotely and in real-time. https://addigy.com/covid-19-addigy-60/?utm_content=covid-19-addigy-60

Arizona State University’s EdPlus is working with Complexly’s Crash Course on a series of entry-level course videos, starting with English composition. (Complexly and Crash Course are an initiative of the Green brothers, hosts of a popular vlog and best-selling fiction.) The new content in “Study Hall,” won’t offer credit or replace any degree programs, but rather will serve as a supplement for high school or college learners. Each subject will be the focus of about 15 videos 15 minutes long, covering major points in the topic. Those are being hosted on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNrrxHpJhC8mNXjrAL3Ey1Q6iI35cymzl

Babbel is offering three months of free language learning to U.S. students through mid-June 2020 in any of its languages: Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Turkish, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Indonesian, and English. https://welcome.babbel.com/en/student-discount/

Gale is offering educators and librarians free access to digital content and resources to enhance instruction and learning. Resources include: interdisciplinary, curriculum-aligned resources to support online learning; live and on-demand training materials; e-books on virtual learning; and more. https://www.gale.com/covid19support.

Through July 1, Google is allowing G Suite for Education customers to use the Hangouts Meet premium functionality for free. People can host virtual meetings with up to 250 people and live streams with up to 100,000 viewers. Additionally, they’ll be able to save recordings of their meetings to Google Drive. https://support.google.com/meet/answer/9760270?hl=en

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

zoom fatigue

‘Zoom fatigue’ is taxing the brain. Here’s why that happens.

Video calls seemed an elegant solution to remote work, but they wear on the psyche in complicated ways.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/04/coronavirus-zoom-fatigue-is-taxing-the-brain-here-is-why-that-happens/

Multi-person screens magnify this exhausting problem. Gallery view—where all meeting participants appear Brady Bunch-style—challenges the brain’s central vision, forcing it to decode so many people at once that no one comes through meaningfully, not even the speaker.

group video chats become less collaborative and more like siloed panels, in which only two people at a time talk while the rest listen. Because each participant is using one audio stream and is aware of all the other voices, parallel conversations are impossible.

By contrast, the sudden shift to video calls has been a boon for people who have neurological difficulty with in-person exchanges, such as those with autism who can become overwhelmed by multiple people talking.

If you’re feeling self-conscious or overstimulated, Normand recommends you turn off your camera. Save your energy for when you absolutely want to perceive the few non-verbal cues that do come through, such as during the taxing chats with people you don’t know very well, or for when you want the warm fuzzies you get from seeing someone you love. Or if it’s a work meeting that can be done by phone, try walking at the same time.

 

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