Zaption case

Brown v Board of Education

Facebook Oculus

Facebook’s Oculus virtual-reality division: Let’s not go crazy with the hype

The VR industry is at the beginning of what could be the next major technology trend, with the potential to change the way people live, work and communicate.

Digital Teacher

10 Lessons For The Digital Teacher
purpose of my curriculum planning

10 Lessons For The Digital Teacher

  • Manage your time
  • Be organized in your teaching
  • Measure success
  • Be purposeful
  • Find a mentor
  • Always be learning
  • Reflect on your teaching
  • Grow a personal learning network
  • Create teaching files
  • Be open

World of Classcraft

Game On: Physics Teacher Creates World of Classcraft

World of Classcraft, a not-so-subtle nod to the world’s most popular online role-playing game

n a manner similar to other role-playing games, students assume a class—in this case a Mage, a Warrior, or a Healer—that each boasts specific abilities. Working in teams of roughly six to eight students, Young said each student aspires to gain experience points related to positive classroom interactions, and avoid losing hit points for negative activities.

For example, students get 50 experience points for finding a mistake in class notes; 60 points for answering a classroom question correctly; and 100 experience points for good attitude and participation throughout class.

Alternately, students get -10 hit points for arriving late to class and arguing with the game master (teacher) and -30 points for not fishing homework.

assistance with technology

We, the faculty from InforMedia Services

are willing and able to help faculty,
and students
with their academic endeavors in technology.

We offer one-to-one sessions,
production and
instructional design assistance,
instructional sessions
and in-class technology instructions.
you can reach us by email:

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IMS blog:

ePortfolio patterns

Learning made visible: successful ePortfolio patterns across the U.S.

  • Register for first AAEEBL webinar of 2015-2016 on September 16 at 1 pm US EDT.  Jeff Yan of Digication addressing
    “Learning made visible: successful ePortfolio patterns across the U.S.” 

Jeff, a former academic, is the CEO of Digication, one of the most successful eportfolio companies in the U. S.  He will help us understand the big picture:  how are eportfolios being used on campuses and what works best.

This Webinar is co-sponsored by AAC&U, EPAC and IJeP.

Once you register, you will see an acknowledgement page with the URL to go to on Wednesday. You will not need a password.

Recording available:

The International Journal of ePortfolio (IJeP) is a double-blind, peer-reviewed, open access journal freely available online.


Pebble Pad


Using an ePortfolio to Assess the Outcomes of a First-Year Seminar: Student Narrative and Authentic Assessment;

Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based Learning

themes: strong admin support, instructional design

crowdsourcing: teacher asks students to respond to critical thinking q/s and students populate their eportfolio

make learning visible for ” students, faculty, institution and employer

E-Portfolios: Competency Marketplaces For Colleges
only 13% of Millennials are using LinkedIn and only 7% more have future plans to do so. As I think about it, this makes sense. LinkedIn’s content isn’t directed at traditional-age college students. And few students have professional relationships or relevant work experience to show, which is the whole point of $LNKD.

How does the ePortfolio support in helping students achieve those goals. The ePortfolio should not be another thing they (and the faculty) need to do on top of everything else they are already doing.



——–Call for Papers ICEduTech 2015 (last call): submissions until 2 October 2015 ————-

International Conference on Educational Technologies 2015

30 November-2 December 2015, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil


* Keynote Speakers (confirmed):

Professor Piet Kommers, University of Twente, The Netherlands

Professor Pedro Isaías, Universidade Aberta (Portuguese Open University), Portugal

* Conference Scope

The Educational Technologies 2015 conference (ICEduTech) is the scientific conference addressing the real topics as seen by teachers, students, parents and school leaders. Both scientists, professionals and institutional leaders are invited to be informed by experts, sharpen the understanding what education needs and how to achieve it.

The conference covers six main areas: Education in Context, Education as Professional Field, Curricular Evolution, Learner Orientation, Integrating Educational Technologies and International Higher Education. These broad areas are divided into more detailed areas, for more information please check

* Paper Submission

This is a blind peer-reviewed conference. Authors are invited to submit their papers in English through the conference submission system by October 2, 2015. Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously.

* Important Dates:
– Submission Deadline (last call): 2 October 2015
– Notification to Authors (last call): 26 October 2015
– Final Camera-Ready Submission and Early Registration (last call): Until 6 November 2015
– Late Registration (last call): After 6 November 2015

* Paper Publication
The papers will be published in book and electronic format with ISBN, will be made available through the Digital Library available at
The conference proceedings will be submitted for indexing to INSPEC, EI Compendex, Thomson ISI, ISTP and other indexing services.

Selected papers of best papers will be extended in order to be included in a Special Issue of JICES (, entitled “The Impact of Smart Technology on Users and Society”. This journal is indexed by Scopus and other selected indexes.

Extended versions of best papers will also be invited for publication in journals, in an international book and in other selected and indexed publications.

* Conference Contact:
Web site:

* Organized by: International Association for Development of the Information Society
Co-Organized by: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina and UNISINOS


Adobe Flash

Adobe Flash just took another step towards death, thanks to Google

Google officially killed Flash advertising in its browser. As of September 1, any advertising that uses the technology requires the user to click it to play — it’ll otherwise remain frozen.

A new setting, enabled by default in Chrome automatically optimizes plugins to save battery power and CPU cycles and specifically targeting autoplaying advertising.

Traditional Texts preferred over E-Books

Survey: Most Students Prefer Traditional Texts over E-Books

Reasons commonly cited by students for preferring traditional books include:

  • They are easier to read;
  • Students like to physically highlight selections;
  • They’re cheaper;
  • Students prefer the formatting;
  • They’re easier to navigate and bookmark;
  • E-books make students’ eyes hurt;
  • Students find it harder to concentrate on e-books;
  • Traditional books do not require Internet access;
  • Students like to write on the pages;
  • Tablets or laptops are not allowed in class;
  • Availability of e-books is limited; and
  • Students end up printing the pages of e-books anyway.

Among the 27 percent of respondents who do prefer e-books, common reasons for the preference include:

  • E-books are cheaper;
  • They are lighter;
  • They don’t have to be returned;
  • They are more environmentally friendly than paper books;
  • They are searchable;
  • Print size and brightness is adjustable;
  • They can convert text to audio; and
  • They can be used with apps.

MN E-Summit 2015 had two speakers on the e-book topic:

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open: MN Learning Commons

David sited same stats as in this article:

“According to the Student Monitor, 87 percent of textbooks purchased by students in 2014 were print editions (36 percent new, 36 percent used, 15 percent rented). E-books comprised only 9 percent of the market. The remaining 4 percent was made up by file sharing.”

but puts the stress on e-books as an option to cut the greedy publishing houses and bring down the cost (MN Learning Commons)