Archive of ‘instructional technology’ category

VR chemistry

MEL Science Launches Virtual Reality Chemistry Lessons

By Richard Chang 06/15/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/06/15/mel-science-launches-virtual-reality-chemistry-lessons.aspx

MEL Science, based in London, has launched a series of virtual reality (VR) chemistry lessons for K–12. The 3-year-old company this week released a MEL Chemistry VR app, featuring a virtual chemistry lab, for free on Google Daydream. This free version, which contains the first six chemistry lessons, is available at this MEL Science site.

MEL Science aims to release more than 150 lessons covering all the main topics included in K–12 schools’ chemistry curriculum. Later this year, MEL Science also aims to add support for other VR platforms, including Google Cardboard and Samsung Gear VR.

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more on VR in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

GradeCraft

University of Michigan Commercializes Gameful Learning Tool

By Rhea Kelly 06/20/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/06/20/university-of-michigan-commercializes-gameful-learning-tool.aspx

GradeCraft, the software uses gaming elements such as competition, badges and unlocks to help students progress through their courses.

GradeCraft was co-developed in 2012 by Barry Fishman, professor at the University of Michigan’s Schools of Information and Education, and Caitlin Holman, doctoral candidate in the School of Information and lead software developer at Office of Academic Innovation‘s Digital Innovation Greenhouse. The project was recognized with a Campus Technology Innovators award in 2016.

The University of Arizona has become one of the first universities to purchase a site license for GradeCraft.

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more on gamification in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

microcredentials

What You Need to Know About Microcredentials

ELI Online Event | July 12, 2017 | Noon–4:00 p.m. (ET)

One in five colleges have issued digital badges, according to a recent survey.* Today, all kinds of organizations, from higher education institutions to professional associations to employers, are issuing digital microcredentials. Are you?

Join us for “Microcredentials and Digital Badging in Higher Education,” where expert presenters from various higher education, industry, and government fields will explore today’s issues. Here are just a few highlights:

Join us for an introductory webinar, “Alternative Credentialing in Higher Education,” on July 10. Both events are free and open to all EDUCAUSE members (available to purchase for nonmembers).

Register Now →

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more about badges and microcredentials
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

tutorials on MediaSpace

https://nhcc.ims.mnscu.edu/shared/StudentTraining/MediaSpace%20Instructions-Students.pdf
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/files/2013/10/Getting-Started-with-MediaSpace-v5-14ziaj5.pdf

https://learn.winona.edu/MediaSpace

https://knowledge.kaltura.com/kaltura-capturespace-lite-getting-started

https://knowledge.kaltura.com/kaltura-capturespace-lite-user-guide

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more on MediaSpace in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mediaspace

bitly vs goo.gl

Bitly vs. Goo.gl

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/05/bitly-vs-googl.html

Bitly – Pros & Cons
Pro – If you create a free Bitly.com account you can customize your shortened URLs so that they spell words or at least have initials and numbers that are related to an event.

Con –  A few years ago Bitly removed the option to create QR codes while also shortening URLs. So if you need a QR code to go with your shortened URL, you might want to try Goo.gl.

Goo.gl – Pros & Cons
Pro – Goo.gl is available in your Google Account. You can create shortened URLs and QR codes at the same time in Goo.gl.

Con – Goo.gl doesn’t let you customize the shortened URL that is generated for you. You’re stuck with the randomly generated characters that are given to you.

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more on link shorteners in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=link+shortener

media education differentiated instruction

Friezem, Y. (2017). THE MEDIA PRODUCTION HIVE: USING MEDIA EDUCATION FOR DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION.  Media Education, 8(1), 123-140

https://www.academia.edu/33079666/The_media_production_hive_Using_media_education_for_differentiated_instruction?auto=download

keywords: Media production, media literacy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), executive
functioning, Media Production Hive

the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning (Rose & Meyer, 2002), teaching the same material via various strategies that cumulatively address needs and learning types of each student in the classroom (p. 126). acknowledge all the various types of learners in his class, such as visual learners, auditory learners, write-read learners, and kinesthetic learners, following Gardner’s (1983) multiple intelligence theory.
various ways of receiving, processing, and expressing information by different learners
various ways students can chose to engage in the process of learning
(p. 127) multiple means of representation guarantees each learner processes information in the best way they can, but it also provides repetition of the topic in various ways to deepen understanding
Students need to organize recently acquired knowledge in a strategic way and communicate their understanding to the teacher. Rose and Meyer (2002) created a detailed pathway for teachers to apply UDL using assistive technology.

Media education practices involve demystifying media messages and learning to use
media wisely through activities of evaluation, composition, introspection, and civic engagement. the links between the instructional design of lessons for all students and
the critical analysis, expression, and reflection on media messages are gradually
explored (Dalton, 2017).
Dalton, E. M. (2017). Universal design for learning: Guiding principles to reduce
barriers to digital & media literacy competence. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 9(2).

p. 128 Media production is the process of composing a message via a single or various media platforms. Media production includes creating videos, podcasts, presentations, posters, drawings, and books. With the increasing use of digital devices and applications, students are engaged in various ways to convey their messages using multiple ways of expression and multiple types of representations.

digitalempathy.net/hive

digital empathy media production hive

digital and media literacy competencies (Hobbs, 2010)

p. 137 challenges

Group dynamics often reveal power struggles among team members (Friesem, 2014). The responsibility of the media educator, who is not a mediator by training, is to find the way to mitigate the tension caused by differences among group members (Friesem, 2010). In addition, students have the tendency to use media production as a transgressive practice (Moore, 2011; Grace & Tubin, 1998). Facilitating the process of production involves constant reflection on the classroom power relationship using critical and pragmatic lenses.
Grace, D., & Tobin, J. (1998). Butt jokes and mean-teacher parodies: Video production
in the elementary classroom. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Teaching popular culture: Beyond radical pedagogy (pp. 42-62). London, UK: University College London Press.

The discourse about the implementations of UDL with digital technology has been broad and used for several research studies (Rose & Meyer, 2002).
Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal
design for learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
more on instructional desing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

VR and AR in the classroom

Leslie Fisher Thinks Augmented Reality First, Then VR in the Classroom

05/12/17

https://thejournal.com/Articles/2017/05/12/Leslie-Fisher-Presents-at-Ed-Tech-Conferences-for-a-Living.aspx

Most kids can’t afford to buy their own Oculus headset. Google Cardboard. Google Street View

If you search Twitter effectively, there are not only great resources but great people to help you teach differently and keep the classroom more entertaining. You can grow your own personal learning network.

Versal

Quizlet

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

asynch and LMS online

Asynch Delivery and the LMS Still Dominate for Online Programs

By Dian Schaffhauser  05/22/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/asynch-delivery-and-the-lms-still-dominate-for-online-programs.aspx

a recent research project  by Quality Matters and Eduventures, the “Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE)” offers a “baseline” examination of program development, quality measures and other structural issues.

95 percent of larger programs (those with 2,500 or more online program students) are “wholly asynchronous” while 1.5 percent are mainly or completely synchronous. About three-quarters (73 percent) of mid-sized programs (schools with between 500 and 2,499 online program students) and 62 percent of smaller programs are fully asynchronous.

The asynchronous nature of this kind of education may explain why threaded discussions turned up as the most commonly named teaching and learning technique, mentioned by 27.4 percent of respondents, closely followed by practice-based learning, listed by 27.3 percent of survey participants.

Blackboard and Instructure Canvas dominated. Audio- and videoconferencing come in a “distant second,” according to the researchers. The primary brands that surfaced for those functions were Adobe Connect, Cisco WebEx, Zoom, Kaltura, Panopto, TechSmith Camtasia and Echo360.

While the LMS plays a significant role in online programming, the report pointed to a distinct lack of references to “much-hyped innovations,” such as adaptive learning, competency-based education systems, simulation or game-based learning tools. (my note: my mouth run dry of repeating every time people start becoming orgasmic about LMS, D2L in particular)

four in 10 require the use of instructional design support, three in 10 use a team approach for online course design and one in 10 outsources the work. Overall, some 80 percent of larger programs use instructional design expertise.

In the smallest programs, instructional design support is treated as a “faculty option” for 53 percent of institutions. Another 18 percent expect faculty to develop their online courses independently. For 13 percent of mid-sized programs, the faculty do their development work independently; another 64 percent may choose whether or not to bring in instructional design help. (my note: this is the SCSU ‘case’)

Measuring Quality

Among the many possible quality metrics suggested by the researchers, the five adopted most frequently for internal monitoring were:

  • Student achievement of program objectives (83 percent);
  • Student retention and graduation rates (77 percent);
  • Program reputation (48 percent);
  • Faculty training (47 percent); and
  • Student engagement measures (41 percent).

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

digitization impact on academic library

Survey Highlights Digitization’s Impact on Campus Libraries

By David Raths  05/22/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/survey-highlights-digitizations-impact-on-campus-libraries.aspx

nonprofit Ithaka S+R. The study, Ithaka S+R Library Survey 2016, highlighted a number of challenges facing library directors in an era of increased digitization. Future Trends Forum video chat May 19 hosted by Bryan Alexander.

Alexander zeroed in on the finding that library directors feel increasingly less valued by supervisors such as chief academic officers.

Not surprisingly, the survey illustrates a broad shift toward electronic resources, Wolff-Eisenberg noted, with an increasing number of libraries developing policies for de-accessioning print materials that are also available digitally.

library directors are increasingly recognizing that discovery does not always happen in the library. Compared to the 2013 survey results, fewer library directors believe that it is important that the library is seen by its users as the first place that they go to discover content, and fewer believe that the library is always the best place for researchers at their institution to start their research.

There is also a substantial gap between how faculty members and library directors perceive the library’s contribution in supporting student learning. Both tend to agree that students have poor research skills, Wolff-Eisenberg noted. The faculty members see it as more of a problem, but they are less likely than library directors to see librarians contributing to student learning by helping them to develop research skills

The positions for which respondents anticipate the most growth in the next five years are related to instructional design (my note: this is IMS), information literacy and specialized faculty research support involving digital humanities, geographical information systems (GIS) and data management.

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more on digitization in academic libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitization+library

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