Archive of ‘instructional technology’ category

digital assessment

Unlocking the Promise of Digital Assessment

By Stacey Newbern Dammann, EdD, and Josh DeSantis October 30, 2017

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-with-technology-articles/unlocking-promise-digital-assessment/

The proliferation of mobile devices and the adoption of learning applications in higher education simplifies formative assessment. Professors can, for example, quickly create a multi-modal performance that requires students to write, draw, read, and watch video within the same assessment. Other tools allow for automatic grade responses, question-embedded documents, and video-based discussion.

  • Multi-Modal Assessments – create multiple-choice and open-ended items that are distributed digitally and assessed automatically. Student responses can be viewed instantaneously and downloaded to a spreadsheet for later use.
    • (socrative.com) and
    • Poll Everywhere (http://www.pollev.com).
    • Formative (http://www.goformative.com) allows professors to upload charts or graphic organizers that students can draw on with a stylus. Formative also allows professors to upload document “worksheets” which can then be augmented with multiple-choice and open-ended questions.
    • Nearpod (http://www.nearpod.com) allows professors to upload their digital presentations and create digital quizzes to accompany them. Nearpod also allows professors to share three-dimensional field trips and models to help communicate ideas.
  • Video-Based Assessments – Question-embedded videos are an outstanding way to improve student engagement in blended or flipped instructional contexts. Using these tools allows professors to identify if the videos they use or create are being viewed by students.
    • EdPuzzle (edpuzzle.com) and
    • Playposit (http://www.playposit.com) are two leaders in this application category. A second type of video-based assessment allows professors to sustain discussion-board like conversation with brief videos.
    • Flipgrid (http://www.flipgrid.com), for example, allows professors to posit a video question to which students may respond with their own video responses.
  • Quizzing Assessments – ools that utilize close-ended questions that provide a quick check of student understanding are also available.
    • Quizizz (quizizz.com) and
    • Kahoot (http://www.kahoot.com) are relatively quick and convenient to use as a wrap up to instruction or a review of concepts taught.

Integration of technology is aligned to sound formative assessment design. Formative assessment is most valuable when it addresses student understanding, progress toward competencies or standards, and indicates concepts that need further attention for mastery. Additionally, formative assessment provides the instructor with valuable information on gaps in their students’ learning which can imply instructional changes or additional coverage of key concepts. The use of tech tools can make the creation, administration, and grading of formative assessment more efficient and can enhance reliability of assessments when used consistently in the classroom. Selecting one that effectively addresses your assessment needs and enhances your teaching style is critical.

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more on digital assessment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/15/fake-news-bib/

Software Carpentry Workshop

Minnesota State University Moorhead – Software Carpentry Workshop

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/minnesota-state-university-moorhead-software-carpentry-workshop-registration-38516119751

Reservation code: 680510823  Reservation for: Plamen Miltenoff

Hagen Hall – 600 11th St S – Room 207 – Moorhead

pad.software-carpentry.org/2017-10-27-Moorhead

http://www.datacarpentry.org/lessons/

https://software-carpentry.org/lessons/

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Friday

Jeff – certified Bash Python, John

http://bit.do/msum_swc

https://ntmoore.github.io/2017-10-27-Moorhead/

what is shall and what does it do. language close to computers, fast.

what is “bash” . cd, ls

shell job is a translator between the binory code, the middle name. several types of shells, with slight differences. one natively installed on MAC and Unix. born-again shell

bash commands: cd change director, ls – list; ls -F if it does not work: man ls (manual for LS); colon lower left corner tells you can scrool; q for escape; ls -ltr

arguments is colloquially used with different names. options, flags, parameters

cd ..  – move up one directory .      pwd : see the content      cd data_shell/   – go down one directory

cd ~  – brings me al the way up .        $HOME (universally defined variable

the default behavior of cd is to bring to home directory.

the core shall commands accept the same shell commands (letters)

$ du -h .     gives me the size of the files. ctrl C to stop

$ clear . – clear the entire screen, scroll up to go back to previous command

man history $ history $! pwd (to go to pwd . $ history | grep history (piping)

$ cat (and the file name) – standard output

$ cat ../

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how to edit and delete files

to create new folder: $ mkdir . – make directory

text editors – nano, vim (UNIX text editors) .      $ nano draft.txt .  ctrl O (save) ctr X (exit) .
$ vim . shift  esc (key)  and in command line – wq (write quit) or just “q”

$ mv draft.txt ../data . (move files)

to remove $ rm thesis/:     $ man rm

copy files       $cp    $ touch . (touches the file, creates if new)

remove $ rm .    anything PSEUDO is dangerous   Bash profile: cp -i

*- wild card, truncate       $ ls analyzed      (list of the analyized directory)

stackoverflow web site .

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head command .  $head basilisk.day (check only the first several lines of a large file

$ for filename in basilisk.dat unicorn.dat . (making a loop = multiline)

> do (expecting an action) do

> head -n 3 $filename . (3 is for the first three line of the file to be displayed and -n is for the number)

> done

for doing repetitive functions

also

$ for filename in *.dat ; do head -n 3$x; done

$ for filename in *.dat ; do echo $filename do head -n 3$x; done

$ echo $filename (print statement)

how to loop

$ for filename in *.dat ; do echo $filename ; echo head -n 3 $filename ; done

ctrl c or apple comd dot to get out of the loop

http://swcarpentry.github.io/shell-novice/02-filedir/

also

$ for filename in *.dat

> do

> $filename

> head -n  10 (first ten files ) $filename | tail  -n 20 (last twenty lines)

$ for filename  in *.dat

do
>> echo  $filename
>> done

$ for filename in *.dat
>> do
>> cp $filename orig_$filename
>>done\

history > something else

$ head something.else

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another function: word count

$ wc *.pdb  (protein databank)

$ head cubane.pdb

if i don;t know how to read the outpun $ man wc

the difference between “*” and “?”

$ wc -l *.pdb

$

wc -l *.pdb > lenghts.txs

cat lenghts.txt

$ for fil in *.txt
>>> do
>>> wc -l $fil

by putting a $ sign use that not the actual text.

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nano middle.sh . The entire point of shell is to automate

$ bash (exectubale) to run the program middle.sh

rwx – rwx – rwx . (owner – group -anybody)

bash middle.sh

$ file middle.sh

$path .

$ echo $PATH | tr “:” “\n”

/usr/local/bin

/usr/bin

/bin

/usr/sbin

/sbin

/Applications/VMware Fusion.app/Contents/Public

/usr/local/munki

$ export PATH=$PWD:$PATH

(this is to make sure that the last version of Python is running)

$ ls ~ . (hidden files)        

$ ls -a ~

$ touch .bach_profile .bashrc

$history | grep PATH

   19   echo $PATH

   44  echo #PATH | tr “:” “\n”

   45   echo $PATH | tr “:” “\n”

   46   export PATH=$PWD:$PATH

   47  echo #PATH | tr “:” “\n”

   48   echo #PATH | tr “:” “\n”

   55  history | grep PATH

 

wc -l “$@” | sort -n ($@  – encompasses eerything. will process every single file in the list of files

 

$ chmod (make it executable)

 

$ find . -type d . (find only directories, recursively, ) 

$ find . -type f (files, instead of directories)

$ find . -name ‘*.txt’ . (find files by name, don’t forget single quotes)

$ wc -l $(find . -name ‘*.txt’)  – when searching among direcories on different level

$ find . -name ‘*.txt’ | xargs wc -l    –  same as above ; two ways to do one and the same

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Saturday

Python

Link to the Python Plotting : https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder

C and C++. scripting purposes in microbiology (instructor). libraries, packages alongside Python, which can extend its functionality. numpy and scipy (numeric and science python). Python for academic libraries?

going out of python $ quit () .      python expect beginning and end parenthesis

new terminal needed after installation. anaconda 5.0.1

python 3 is complete redesign, not only an update.

http://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/setup/

jupyter crashes in safari. open in chrome. spg engine maybe

https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/01-run-quit/

to start python in the terminal $ python

>> variable = 3

>> variable +10

several data types.

stored in JSON format.

command vs edit code.  code cell is the gray box. a text cell is plain text

markdown syntax. format working with git and github .  search explanation in https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/01-run-quit/

hackMD https://hackmd.io/ (use your GIthub account)

PANDOC – translates different data formats. https://pandoc.org/

print is a function

in what cases i will run my data trough Python instead of SPSS?

python is a 0 based language. starts counting with 0 – Java, C, P

atom_name = ‘helium ‘
print(atom_name[0])                  string slicing and indexing is tricky

atom_name = ‘helium ‘
print(atom_name[0:6])
vs
atom_name = ‘helium ‘
print(atom_name[7])                python does not know how to slice it
synthax of python is        start : end : countby/step
string versus list .   string is in a single quote, list will have brakets
strings allow me to work not only w values, revers the string
atom_name = ‘helium lithium beryllium’
print(atom_name[::-1])
muillyreb muihtil muileh
Atom_name = ‘helium’
len (atom_name)                                     6 .             case sensitive
to clean the memory, restart the kernel
objects in Python have different types. adopt a class, value may have class inherent in its defintion
print (type(’42’)) .   Python tells me that it is a string
print (type(42)) .    tells e it is a string
LaTex
to combine integer and letter: print (str(1) + ‘A’)
converting a string to integer . : print (1 + int(’55’)) .    all the same type
translation table. numerical representation of a string
float
print (‘half is’, 1 / 2.0)
built in functions and help
print is a function, lenght is a function (len); type, string, int, max, round,
Python does not explain well why the code breaks
ASCI character set – build in Python conversation
libraries – package: https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/06-libraries/
function “import”
 Saturdady afternoon
reading .CSV in Python
http://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/files/python-novice-gapminder-data.zip
**For windows users only: set up git https://swcarpentry.github.io/workshop-template/#git 
python is object oriented and i can define the objects
python creates its own types of objects (which we model) and those are called “DataFrame”
method applied it is an attribute to data that already exists. – difference from function
data.info() . is function – it does not take any arguments
whereas
data.columns . is a method
print (data.T) .  transpose.  not easy in Excel, but very easy in Python
print (data.describe()) .
/Users/plamen_local/anaconda3/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pandas/__init__.py
%matplotlib inline teling Jupyter notebook

import pandas

data = pandas.read_csv(‘/Users/plamen_local/Desktop/data/gapminder_gdp_oceania.csv’ , index_col=’country’)
data.loc[‘Australia’].plot()
plt.xticks(rotation=10)

GD plot 2 is the most well known library.

xelatex is a PDF engine.  reST restructured text like Markdown.  google what is the best PDF engine with Jupyter

four loops .  any computer language will have the concept of “for” loop. In Python: 1. whenever we create a “for” loop, that line must end with a single colon

2. indentation.  any “if” statement in the “for” loop, gets indented

pedagogically sound Minecraft examples

FridayLive!! Oct 27 THIS WEEK 2:00 PM EDT 

Minecraft for Higher Ed? Try it. Pros, Cons, Recommendations? 

Description: Why Minecraft, the online video game? How can Minecraft improve learning for higher education?
We’ll begin with a live demo in which all can participate (see “Minecraft for Free”).
We’ll review “Examples, Not Rumors” of successful adaptations and USES of Minecraft for teaching/learning in higher education. Especially those submitted in advance
And we’ll try to extract from these activities a few recommendations/questions/requests re Minecraft in higher education.

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Examples:

Minecraft Education Edition: https://education.minecraft.net/
(more info: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/05/23/minecraft-education-edition/)

K12: 

Minecraft empathy skillshttp://www.gettingsmart.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/How-Minecraft-Supports-SEL.pdf 

coding w MineCraft

Minecraft for Math

Higher Ed: 

Minecraft Higher Education?

Using MCEE in Higher Education

Why NOT to use minecraft in education:

https://higheredrevolution.com/why-educators-probably-shouldn-t-use-minecraft-in-their-classrooms-989f525c6e62

College Students Get Virtual Look at the Real World with ‘Minecraft’

Carnegie Mellon University uses the game-based learning tool to help students demonstrate engineering skills. SEP182017

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2017/09/college-students-get-virtual-look-real-world-minecraft

Using Minecraft in Higher Education

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/minecraft-teachers/cED6MM0E0bQ

Using MinecraftEdu – Part 1 – Introduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lsfd9J5UgVk

Physics with Minecraft example

Chemistry with Minecraft example

Biology

other disciplines

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Does learning really happen w Minecraft?

Callaghan, N. (2016). Investigating the role of Minecraft in educational learning environments. Educational Media International53(4), 244-260. doi:10.1080/09523987.2016.1254877

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d119571817%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Noelene Callaghan dissects the evolution in Australian education from a global perspective. She rightfully draws attention (p. 245) to inevitable changes in the educational world, which still remain ignored: e.g., the demise of “traditional” LMS (Educase is calling for their replacement with digital learning environments http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/07/06/next-gen-digital-learning-environment/ and so does the corporate world of learning: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/digital-learning/ ), the inevitability of BYOD (mainly by the “budget restrictions and sustainability challenges” (p. 245); by the assertion of cloud computing, and, last but not least, by the gamification of education.

p. 245 literature review. In my paper, I am offering more comprehensive literature review. While Callaghan focuses on the positive, my attempt is to list both pros and cons: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

 

  1. 246 General use of massive multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs)

levels of interaction have grown dramatically and have led to the creation of general use of massive multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs)

  1. 247 In teaching and learning environments, affordances associated with edugames within a project-based learning (PBL) environment permit:
  • (1)  Learner-centered environments
  • (2)  Collaboration
  • (3)  Curricular content
  • (4)  Authentic tasks
  • (5)  Multiple expression modes
  • (6)  Emphasis on time management
  • (7)  Innovative assessment (Han & Bhattacharya, 2001).

These affordances develop both social and cognitive abilities of students

 

Nebel, S., Schneider, S., Beege, M., Kolda, F., Mackiewicz, V., & Rey, G. (2017). You cannot do this alone! Increasing task interdependence in cooperative educational videogames to encourage collaboration. Educational Technology Research & Development65(4), 993-1014. doi:10.1007/s11423-017-9511-8

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d124132216%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Abrams, S. S., & Rowsell, J. (2017). Emotionally Crafted Experiences: Layering Literacies in Minecraft. Reading Teacher70(4), 501-506.

Nebel, S., Schneider, S., & Daniel Rey, G. (2016). Mining Learning and Crafting Scientific Experiments: A Literature Review on the Use of Minecraft in Education and Research. Source: Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 19(192), 355–366. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/jeductechsoci.19.2.355

Cipollone, M., Schifter, C. C., & Moffat, R. A. (2014). Minecraft as a Creative Tool: A Case Study. International Journal Of Game-Based Learning4(2), 1-14.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ1111251%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Niemeyer, D. J., & Gerber, H. R. (2015). Maker culture and Minecraft : implications for the future of learning. Educational Media International52(3), 216-226. doi:10.1080/09523987.2015.1075103

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Nebel, S., Schneider, S., & Daniel Rey, G. (2016). Mining Learning and Crafting Scientific Experiments: A Literature Review on the Use of Minecraft in Education and Research. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 19(192), 355–366. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/jeductechsoci.19.2.355

 

Wilkinson, B., Williams, N., & Armstrong, P. (2013). Improving Student Understanding, Application and Synthesis of Computer Programming Concepts with Minecraft. In The European Conference on Technology in the Classroom 2013. Retrieved from http://iafor.info/archives/offprints/ectc2013-offprints/ECTC2013_0477.pdf

Berg Marklund, B., & Alklind Taylor, A.-S. (2015). Teachers’ Many Roles in Game-Based Learning Projects. In Academic Conferences International Limited (pp. 359–367). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/openview/15e084a1c52fdda188c27b9d2de6d361/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=396495

Uusi-Mäkelä, M., & Uusi-Mäkelä, M. (2014). Immersive Language Learning with Games: Finding Flow in MinecraftEdu. EdMedia: World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (Vol. 2014). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved from https://www.learntechlib.org/noaccess/148409/

Birt, J., & Hovorka, D. (2014). Effect of mixed media visualization on learner perceptions and outcomes. In 25th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (pp. 1–10). Retrieved from http://epublications.bond.edu.au/fsd_papers/74

Al Washmi, R., Bana, J., Knight, I., Benson, E., Afolabi, O., Kerr, A., Hopkins, G. (2014). Design of a Math Learning Game Using a Minecraft Mod. https://doi.org/10.13140/2.1.4660.4809
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267135810_Design_of_a_Math_Learning_Game_Using_a_Minecraft_Mod
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uch2iC_CGsESdF9lpATGwWkamNbqQ7JOYEu_D-V03LQ/edit?usp=sharing

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more on Minecraft in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=minecraft

faculty training for online teaching

he EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv

Quick poll – do you require your faculty to be trained how to teach online before they are allowed to teach an online course at your institution?

Kristen Brown, Assistant Director, UofL Online

YES. Our faculty are required to complete two classes. One on using the LMS and the other is a 5-week moderated course called Teaching Online. Both courses are offered online.

Linda C. Morosko, MA   Director, eStarkState Division of Student Success

Chad Maxson, EdD │  Dean of Online Learning, Olivet Nazarene University │ Center for Teaching and Learning One University Avenue │ Bourbonnais, IL  60914

Gina Okun Assistant Dean, Online Berkeley College 64 East Midland Avenue, Suite 2 Paramus, NJ 07652

The online academic program director (i.e. MBA, M.Ed.) and I meet with each new instructor to go materials that cover providing instructor presence and best practices in general. I also ask that they sign something that lists 14 online teaching practices we expect as an institution. They also have to complete some LMS training so that they can post announcements, participate in discussions, and manage their gradebook.

We are currently designing a more formal 6 hour online training that is required.

Course design is separate and that’s a 16 week process with our designers.

Tex Brieger  Director of Distance Education (814) 871-7134

Absolutely.  Also, we give them a stipend to attend the training and develop and online course.

Linda S. Futch, Ed.D. Department Head, Course Design and Development Center for Distributed Learning University of Central Florida

I think the bigger need is for ongoing training for recertification to teach online as technology and online pedagogical models evolve over time.

Kelvin Kelvin Bentley <timelord33@GMAIL.COM>

At Suffolk yes, we do.  Over time that went from essentially “how to make the LMS work” to a Faculty Academy where faculty spend an entire semester working as a cohort to examine online pedagogy and best practices.  The latter works much better for sound course development.

Doug Kahn College Assistant Dean for IT Operations Suffolk County Community College 533 College Road Selden, NY 11784

I can’t speak of other accrediting bodies, but SACS-COC is fairly clear in its documentation that faculty should be adequately trained before teaching online. Prior to my arrival at U of R in 2015, I worked for 20 years at E. Carolina U. which has a large assortment of online programs and courses. I assisted in the process of designing several online training modules that were to serve as “basic training” (with assessments) for online instructors…directly due to needing to meet accreditation guidelines. As part of documentation for reaffirmation/reaccreditation, had to provide documentation showing that faculty had successfully completed the training. I believe it is required to complete every three years.

Michael Dixon, Assistant Director Center for Teaching, Learning & Technology University of Richmond


I wish we did, but we do not.  We run up against contract issues with.  Certainly, this could be changed with institutional will but would require a shift in how our agreements with the faculty union.

TRAVIS FREEMAN, MFA  EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPER FACULTY AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT CENTRE (FCDC) Office Location: 113 McCaul St, Room 501 T 416 977 6000 x3358 E tfreeman@ocadu.ca

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more on online teaching in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+teaching

effective presentations and AR

SORRY, POWERPOINT: THE SLIDE DECK OF THE FUTURE WILL BE IN AR

https://www.wired.com/story/prezi-augmented-reality/
augmented reality takeover. It’s played out at Snapchat and Facebook, at Google and Apple. Companies are using AR to design carssell furniture, make little digital sharks swim around your breakfast table. What if Prezi could apply that same technology to make better presentations?
the product isn’t ready for a public launch yet. Prezi has enlisted a select group of influencers to try out the AR tools and offer feedback before the company releases a beta version.

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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=effective+presentations

teaching and learning spaces for VR and AR

Planning a Teaching and Learning Space for Virtual and Augmented Reality

Tuesday, November 14, 2017 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. EST

Planning a Teaching and Learning Space for Virtual and Augmented Reality

Dr. James P. Frazee is the Senior Academic Technology Officer and Director of Instructional Technology Services (ITS) at San Diego State University.

  • The “What”: Defining the Space
  • The “Why”: Making a Case
    • Incubator for research
    • Promotes experimentation
    • Leveraging partnerships with industry players
    • Opportunity to highlight technology
  • The “How”: Designing and Implementing
    • Designing the space

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more on VR in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

online learning attitudes

online learning attitudes

Students match their preference for hybrid learning with a belief that it is the most effective learning environment for them.

Despite the fact that faculty prefer teaching in a hybrid environment, they remain skeptical of online learning. Nearly half do not agree online 45% learning is effective.

https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2017/9/studentst2017infog.pdf

 

Students asked what technologies they wish their instructors used more, and we asked faculty what technologies they think could make them more effective instructors. Both agree that content and resource-focused technologies should be incorporated more and social media and tablets should be incorporated less.

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more on the use (or not) of ed technology in the classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

Google in the classroom

How Has Google Affected The Way Students Learn?

con?:with the advent of personal assistants like Siri and Google Now that aim to serve up information before you even know you need it, you don’t even need to type the questions.

pro: Whenever new technology emerges — including newspapers and television — discussions about how it will threaten our brainpower always crops up, Harvard psychology professor Steven Pinker wrote in a 2010 op-ed in The New York Times. Instead of making us stupid, he wrote, the Internet and technology “are the only things that will keep us smart.”

Pro and conDaphne Bavelier, a professor at the University of Geneva, wrote in 2011 that we may have lost the ability for oral memorization valued by the Greeks when writing was invented, but we gained additional skills of reading and text analysis.

conDaphne Bavelier, a professor at the University of Geneva, wrote in 2011 that we may have lost the ability for oral memorization valued by the Greeks when writing was invented, but we gained additional skills of reading and text analysis.

con: A 2008 study commissioned by the British Library found that young people go through information online very quickly without evaluating it for accuracy.

pro or con?: A 2011 study in the journal Science showed that when people know they have future access to information, they tend to have a better memory of how and where to find the information — instead of recalling the information itself.

pro: The bright side lies in a 2009 study conducted by Gary Small, the director of University of California Los Angeles’ Longevity Center, that explored brain activity when older adults used search engines. He found that among older people who have experience using the Internet, their brains are two times more active than those who don’t when conducting Internet searches.

the Internet holds great potential for education — but curriculum must change accordingly. Since content is so readily available, teachers should not merely dole out information and instead focus on cultivating critical thinking

make questions “Google-proof.”

“Design it so that Google is crucial to creating a response rather than finding one,” he writes in his company’s blog. “If students can Google answers — stumble on (what) you want them to remember in a few clicks — there’s a problem with the instructional design.”

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more on use of laptop and phones in the classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

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