Archive of ‘learning’ category

Library 2.0 Emerging Technologies

third Library 2.019 mini-conference: “Emerging Technology,” which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, October 30th, from 12:00 – 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).

Tomorrow’s technologies are shaping our world today, revolutionizing the way we live and learn. Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Blockchain, Internet of Things, Drones, Personalization, the Quantified Self. Libraries can and should be the epicenter of exploring, building and promoting these emerging techs, assuring the better futures and opportunities they offer are accessible to everyone. Learn what libraries are doing right now with these cutting-edge technologies, what they’re planning next and how you can implement these ideas in your own organization.

This is a free event, being held live online and also recorded.
REGISTER HERE

smartphones technology behavior

Ellis, D. A. (2019). Are smartphones really that bad? Improving the psychological measurement of technology related behaviors. Computers in Human Behavior, 97 
, 60-66
https://www.academia.edu/39660117/Are_smartphones_really_that_bad_Improving_the_psychological_measurement_of_technology-_related_behaviors?auto=download

Conclusions sur- rounding use have therefore been
largely negative and smartphones have repeatedly
been associated with depression (Elhai, Dvorak,
Levine, & Hall, 2017), anxiety (Richardson,
Hussain, & Griffiths, 2018), disrupted sleep
(Rosen, Carrier, Miller, Rokkum, & Ruiz, 2016),
cognitive
impairment (Clayton,
Leshner,&
Almond, 2015), and poor academic performance
(Lepp, Barkley, & Karpinski, 2015). This repeats a
pattern of research priorities, which previously
focused on the ne- gative impacts of many other
screen-based technologies, systematically moving
from television and video games, to the internet
and social media (Rosen et al., 2014).

There is also little
evidence to support the existence of the constructs
under investigation (e.g., technology ‘addiction’),
yet many papers and scales continue to use
language associated with a specific diagnosis (see
Panova & Carbonell, 2018 for a recent review).

When it comes to understanding the impact of
technology more generally, there is an intrinsic
lack of high-quality evidence (Ellis et al., 2018a).
Revised psychometric tests may hold some value
in the future, provided they are grounded in
relevant theory and validated accordingly.

networked college

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-05-10-longtime-higher-ed-leader-and-former-u-s-congressman-argues-for-a-networked-college

Goldie Blumenstyk, called it the “embedded for-profit university” because there’s all these different for-profits operations within a nonprofit higher-ed institution.

One of the MOOC founders who said five years later, well MOOCs have failed as an educational experiment. And my comment to that was, they never were an educational experiment.

Anya Kamenetz called “DIY U” people cobbling together an education from various sources

And we are in a world of multiple new models. The work I’ve done in the last 20 years in online or technologically enhanced learning suggests that fewer than 10 percent of the people who are learners are able to self-direct—or really more like 4 percent.

 

library leadership

Library Leadership Your Way

https://www.alastore.ala.org/content/library-leadership-your-way

core issues

  • discovering why you want to lead;
  • research findings on the five most desirable traits in library leaders;
  • wrestling with the constraints of organizational culture;
  • a tour of practical leadership models such as Theory Z, Situational Leadership, Transformational Leadership, and emotional intelligence;
  • how to develop habits that will bolster your confidence through inevitable moments of doubt;
  • cultivating a “people first, mission always” mentality;
  • self-care for leaders; and
  • living out your unique leadership vision through goal setting, self-evaluation, and other key steps.

lib admin tech lending

Survey of Academic Library Leadership: Evaluation of Library Info Technology Lending Programs (ISBN No:978-1-57440-591-0 )

https://www.primaryresearch.com/AddCart.aspx?ReportID=566

survey of 116 directors, deans and other high level officials of academic libraries about how they feel about their library’s info technology lending programs.
data on the level of satisfaction with such programs, plans for library budget support
for these programs, and plans for new acquisitions of tablets, virtual reality
technology, laptops, digital cameras and other types of information
technology. In addition to looking at plans for the future, the report gives
detailed data on the level and nature of budgetary support for technology
lending programs over the past few years. Survey participants also comment on
which library constituencies use the programs the most.
  • Administrators over age 65 were much more likely than others to want to contract the program while those under age 50 were much less likely.
  • In general, the more sophisticated the degree offered by the college, the greater the likelihood that it had increased spending on its technology lending program over the past three years.
  • Art and architecture students were frequently cited as prime users of academic library technology lending programs.

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