InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'learning' Category

LRS and mobile devices: Please join us in exploring

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 22nd April 2014

Please join us in exploring our mobile devices.

Log in your questions, suggestions and helpful information.

Plamen Miltenoff and Tom Hergert

InforMedia Services

informedia@stcloudstate.edu

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

trhergert@stcloudstate.edu

Contact us via social media:

IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

 

Posted in announcement, educational technology, mobile apps, mobile devices, mobile learning, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

Cheatsheet to Myer Briggs

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 21st April 2014

cheatsheet to Myer Briggs

http://myersbriggs.tumblr.com/post/31022087127

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/259379259763466552/

Posted in brain, learning | No Comments »

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 21st April 2014

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/10/for-students-why-the-question-is-more-important-than-the-answer/

It’s a bit like the Socratic method flipped on its head.

Rule 1: Ask As Many Questions as You Can (Gives License to Ask). There are a number of potential stumbling blocks related to this rule, including:

  • Students struggle trying to produce the questions:
  • Students ask for examples:
  • Groups are working at different pace:
  • Some students are not participating or one student is producing all the questions:

Rule 2: Do Not Stop to Discuss, Judge, or Answer Any Question (Creates Safe Space and Protection).

Rule 3: Write Down Every Question Exactly as It Is Stated (Levels the Playing Field So All Questions and Voices Are Respected.)

Rule 4: Change Any Statement into a Question (Insists on the Discipline of Phrasing, Asking, and Thinking in Questions, Not Statement). Potential challenges that may arise with rule 4 include:

  • Students get off task and start talking:
  • Students are confused about the instructions:
  • The QFocus is not working:

Posted in learning, learning styles, student-centered learning, teaching | No Comments »

How To Gamify Your Classroom In 6 Easy Steps

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th April 2014

How To Gamify Your Classroom In 6 Easy Steps

http://www.edudemic.com/gamify-your-classroom/

  • Clarify your desired learning outcomes first
  • Make them measurable
  • Choose a ‘big idea’
  • Storyboard the game. Make sure there’s room for failure and multiple courses of action.
  • Design learning activities
  • Build teams
  • THEN apply the game dynamics

Posted in gamification, gaming | No Comments »

Minecraft: Games and Gamification

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th April 2014

The Minecraft Experience Panel Presentation Games for Change NYC April 24th 2014

http://www.minecraftexperience.net/G4C2014+Panel

Extended Description:

Last year at G4C Nick Fortugno threw some controversy into the conversation about Minecraft by suggesting Minecraft was not a game but a toy. The proposed panel extends that conversation by asking what is the Minecraft experience, can it be defined or categorised and what as game designers and exponents can we take from understanding its zeitgeist and the impact it has had on the serious gaming landscape?

In 2012/23 at both GLS and G4C many presenters made jokes about including the obligatory Minecraft slide and for very good reasons. Minecraft is arguably a game of immense impact. It has been embraced as part of learning programs focussing on seemingly disparate areas from digital citizenship, history, coding and the maker movement. It is probably the first game brought into the classroom by teachers to leverage the out of school groundswell of existing player excitement. It’s impact is multi generational and perhaps more global than any game before it. The fan base and user community/ies are strong and well supported and exemplar of the potential Jim Gee describes for Big G game. This panel proposes to leverage that Big G space in the lead up to Games for Change 2014 and to honor the voices of its players.

Minecraft has been variously described as a game, toy sandpit, learning space, creative environment, virtual world, and game-infused service. But what really are the affordances of this blocky 16 bit program and how can we even begin to define its value to learning? Enter the Minecraft Experience, a global crowdsourced program managed by Bron Stuckey of The Massively Minecraft Project. People engaging in Minecraft activities about the globe are being invited to describe Minecraft in all its contexts and adaptations. The categories for these experiences will emerge from the crowd sourced content as members contribute thoughts, media, resources and questions to build the __Minecraft Experience__ evidence base.

This panel of notable speakers has been drawn together to answer provocative questions about Minecraft’s success and define its relationship to and impact on learning. The panelists have been chosen to represent play in many contexts formal education, informal learning, self-organised learning, schools and non-school contexts. They include game designers, educators, researchers, learners and parents who have each had a personal and professional experience of this and many other games.

Panelists take a position on the Minecraft experience and use the resources provided by members of the project to inform, support and evidence their case.

How are players, educators and researchers invited to contribute?

  • project wiki to prod, poke, stimulate and support crowd sourced content and dialog
  • live youth speakers on the panel
  • social media and wiki activity in lead-up using selected #minecraftproject
  • video inclusions of educators, parents, kids/youth arguments, evidence and questions
  • promotion of youth media pieces from existing YouTube etc to support and stimulate various provocative dialogs
  • livestream of the panel to global contributors with live feedback and questions.

Who could benefit from joining this project and attending the G4C 2014 panel session?

  • Educators seeking to understand Minecraft’s value to learning
  • Programs seeking to adapt Minecraft as part of a program of impact or change.
  • Game designers seeking to build in its wake
  • Anyone wanting to consider issues of fidelity, adaptation, constructionism, popular culture, and impact in gaming.

http://www.stevehargadon.com/2014/04/learning-revolution-conference-schedule.html

http://www.connectsafely.org/teacher-teaching-minecraft-looks-like/

http://www.pearltrees.com/#/N-f=1_10785583&N-fa=3358517&N-p=105030132&N-play=0&N-s=1_10785583&N-u=1_372724

http://gamesandimpact.org/members/bronst/activity/friends/

Posted in digital identity, gamification, gaming | No Comments »

Peer to peer online tutoring: practical and empirical results

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 19th April 2014

https://www.brainfuse.com/home/peers.asp

http://www.magazine.utoronto.ca/life-on-campus/donny-ouyang-online-peer-tutoring/

https://peers.aristotlecircle.com/page/1-to-1-in-home-tutoring

http://study-guide-services-review.toptenreviews.com/what-is-peer-to-peer-tutoring.html

http://www.azcentral.com/news/arizona/articles/20130426education-nation-peer-tutoring-gets-high-tech-makeover.html

http://jobs.aol.com/videos/job-search/rayku-p2p-online-tutoring-program-startup-presentation/517175995/

Peer reviewed (please consider LRS online dbase to retrieve):
Westera, W., De Bakker, G., & Wagemans, L. (2009). Self-arrangement of fleeting student pairs: a Web 2.0 approach for peer tutoring. Interactive Learning Environments17(4), 341-349. doi:10.1080/10494820903195249

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d45141111%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

http://ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/mcloughlin.html
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036013150600090X

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0740818807000448

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S8755461507000734

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02602930410001689144#.U1J_MvldWSo

Interesting conference proceedings:
Gaofeng, R., & Yeyu, L. (2007). An Online Peer Assisted Learning Community Model and its Application in ZJNU.Online Submission,

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dED500172%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

A model to consider, if you have a higher ed instution in the vicinity and replace freshman students with K12 ones. I like how the authors further classified the tutors into 3 categories:

De Smet, M., Van Keer, H., & Valcke, M. (2008). Blending asynchronous discussion groups and peer tutoring in higher education: An exploratory study of online peer tutoring behaviour. Computers & Education50207-223. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2006.05.001

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/eds/detail?vid=4&sid=2fae304e-fee9-4a4f-8119-386670956bbb%40sessionmgr111&hid=106&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=edselp&AN=S036013150600090X

This is the foundation, which the startup companies from Sillicon Valley are using to make money:
Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., Kester, L., & Sloep, P. (2013). Cognitive load and knowledge sharing in Learning Networks. Interactive Learning Environments21(1), 89-100. doi:10.1080/10494820.2010.548068

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d85198881%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

this is old, but you can take the concepts and apply them right toward your research of using CAI
Dewey, D. P., & Cannon, A. E. (2006). Supporting technology instruction through peer tutoring, discussion boards and electronic journals. IALLT Journal Of Language Learning Technologies38(2), 17.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedo%26AN%3d24660100%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

this one goes towad
Mengping, T. (2014). Mathematics Synchronous Peer Tutoring System for Students with Learning Disabilities.Journal Of Educational Technology & Society17(1), 115-127.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d94937804%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Tsuei, M. (2012). Using Synchronous Peer Tutoring System to Promote Elementary Students’ Learning in Mathematics. Computers & Education58(4), 1171-1182.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ955399%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Posted in Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, Multiple intelligences, online learning, student-centered learning, teaching, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

BYOD in high school: soon to come to college

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 9th April 2014

High school policy is turning from banning mobile devices at school to acceptance of students’ mobile devices and integrating them into the learning process: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)

How is higher ed addressing/integrating such evolution?

byod in high schools

#m #techworkshop #BYOD in schools http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/04/08/a-third-of-secondary-students-use-school-issued-mobile-devices.aspx

Posted in Bring Your Own Device BYOD, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning | No Comments »

SMUG (smart mobile users’ group)

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd April 2014

Good day everyone,

The rising prominence of mobile devices in education and our private lives prompts us to revisit the “tablets” group of 2012/2013. Back then LRS and ITS faculty and staff, who were given iPads and Android tablets, met monthly to share ideas and experience.

With Dean Vargas’s support we plan to reconvene this group. We recognize that many more of us now have mobile devices, including tablets and smart phones, so we invite anyone who has a mobile device (not only a tablet and not only using iOS or Android, but any mobile device or operating system) to meet with us and:

a. share experience and knowledge,

b. seek answers to questions and/or

c. brainstorm and develop ideas as to how we can use these tools more effectively at work and in our private lives.

The group is initially christened as SMUG (smart mobile users’ group, not for our attitude, but for fun). We expect the group to create its own personality and name.

Please contact us if you’re interested. Please have the Doodle poll https://doodle.com/2uaytxbth728sa9b for the initial meeting.

Thanks,

Tom Hergert and Plamen Miltenoff

 

Posted in Android, information literacy, iPAD, mobile devices, mobile learning, technology literacy | 1 Comment »

How Social Media & Game Mechanics Can Motivate Students

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 31st March 2014

How Social Media & Game Mechanics Can Motivate Students

http://mashable.com/2011/05/26/social-media-games-education/

Social media and online games have the potential to convey 21st century skills that aren’t necessarily part of school curricula — things like time management, leadership, teamwork and creative problem solving that will prepare teens for success in college and beyond.

 

Posted in gamification, gaming, social media | No Comments »

The Finland Phenomenon: infographic

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 29th March 2014

Finland Phenomenon

Posted in learning | 1 Comment »