Traditional Texts preferred over E-Books

Survey: Most Students Prefer Traditional Texts over E-Books

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/09/01/survey-most-students-prefer-traditional-texts-over-ebooks.aspx

Reasons commonly cited by students for preferring traditional books include:

  • They are easier to read;
  • Students like to physically highlight selections;
  • They’re cheaper;
  • Students prefer the formatting;
  • They’re easier to navigate and bookmark;
  • E-books make students’ eyes hurt;
  • Students find it harder to concentrate on e-books;
  • Traditional books do not require Internet access;
  • Students like to write on the pages;
  • Tablets or laptops are not allowed in class;
  • Availability of e-books is limited; and
  • Students end up printing the pages of e-books anyway.

Among the 27 percent of respondents who do prefer e-books, common reasons for the preference include:

  • E-books are cheaper;
  • They are lighter;
  • They don’t have to be returned;
  • They are more environmentally friendly than paper books;
  • They are searchable;
  • Print size and brightness is adjustable;
  • They can convert text to audio; and
  • They can be used with apps.

MN E-Summit 2015 had two speakers on the e-book topic:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/

The Balancing Act: Team-Creating an eBook as an Alternative Method for Content Delivery Tom Nechodomu, University of Minnesota

David Wiley. Making Teaching and Learning Awesome with Open: MN Learning Commons

David sited same stats as in this article:

“According to the Student Monitor, 87 percent of textbooks purchased by students in 2014 were print editions (36 percent new, 36 percent used, 15 percent rented). E-books comprised only 9 percent of the market. The remaining 4 percent was made up by file sharing.”

but puts the stress on e-books as an option to cut the greedy publishing houses and bring down the cost (MN Learning Commons)

[don’t] check your smartphone before bed

This is what happens to your brain and body when you check your smartphone before bed

Dr. Dan Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, lays out all of the negative effects that bedtime screen viewing can have on the brain and body. WATCH THE 2 MIN VIDEO

Photoshop series

Welcome to the Fall 2015 four-week series on Photoshop

where: Miller Center 205. Second floor on the East side (computer lab). Here is a virtual reality map:  

when: Today, Sept 3, Sept 10, Sept 17 and Sept 24. 11AM

who: anyone who would like to discuss and hands-on image processing techniques

BRING YOUR OWN PICTURES and have fun with us

Photoshop

Photoshop

 

presentation tools for teaching

21 Top Presentation Tools for Teachers

http://morethanatech.com/2015/07/21/21-top-presentation-tools-for-teachers/

As repeated by me for years, PPT should not be the one and only. Here are some choices. Please consider that IMS delivers workshops, one-on-one sessions and class sessions on the applications listed below:

What Works on What Device

Tool Windows Mac iPad iPad App Chromebook Chromebook App Android
Tablet
Android App
Animoto Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Bunkr Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
Canva Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
Clear Slide Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Creedoo Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
eMaze Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
Flowvella No Yes Yes No No No No No
Goanimate Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
Google Slides Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Haiku Deck Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Impress Yes Yes No No No Yes No No
Keynote No Yes Yes Yes No No No No
KnowledgeVision Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
MoveNote Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
PearDeck Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
PowerPoint Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes
PowerPoint Online Yes Yes No No No Yes No Yes
PowToon Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
Prezi Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Slidedog Yes No No No No No No No
Visme Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No

More on this topic at the IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=presentation&submit=Search

reading fine print

Practical advice to read fine print

from informal Facebook Discussion: with age and / or feeble eyes, how one can read fine print

6 Must-Have Magnifier Apps to Use for Free on Your Android Device

http://www.sellmymobile.com/blog/6-must-magnifier-apps-use-free-android-device/ 

 

mobile video is growing

Mobile video advertising is growing three times as fast as spending on desktop video

YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitch, BuzzFeed, and Snapchat videos are increasingly keeping audiences glued to their small screens, opening up new greenfield opportunities in advertising.

good teaching

New Teacher Advice – ‘Hold On To Your Optimism & Idealism’

http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?cid=25920011&item=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.edweek.org%2Fv1%2Fblog%2F100%2F%3Fuuid%3D47397&cmp=soc-edit-tw-tm

Your job is to grow your students to become independent, self-directed learners not for someday in the distant future, but right now. Students deserve to have clarity on the following questions:

  • Why do I have to learn this? What value is it to me?
  • How will I be assessed?
  • How will I be judged?
  • How will I be supported during the learning experience?

 

future of textbooks

Memento Mori: Why the Chegg IPO is Not About Textbooks

http://www.edukwest.com/chegg-ipo/

About 80% of the revenue still comes from renting textbooks, which might seem a bit outdated with everyone talking about tablet deployments and digital textbooks.

Though heavily funded and with more than 225,000 digital textbooks in its library, the startup was sold for pennies on a dollar to Intel Education last week.

With the Internet and tablet devices, publishers themselves can now go directly for the students through digital products. There is no need for physical bookstores or other middlemen to distribute the textbooks. Also professors are now able to sell their own textbooks directly to students.

This IPO is not so much about the current business of renting physical textbooks but about the time after paper-based textbooks. Chegg apparently does not see a future with publishers or professors by their side, and they will probably choose more direct sales channels in order to balance out sinking margins.

Educational Technology Engaging Students: bookstores, ebooks and cost for students

From Books to Bytes: How Educational Technology is Engaging Students and Enhancing Learning

Sponsored By: VitalSource
This presentation will begin on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 at 11:00 AM Pacific Daylight Time.

http://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/EventLobbyServlet?target=lobby.jsp&eventid=1030139&sessionid=1&key=65FED8F873D5F1BF695F2E0D8A27ADCF&eventuserid=123437779

moderated by Linda Briggs

David Kent Director VOLSHOP (official bookstore) U of Tennessee, Knoxville
Lisa Kiefer, Managing Director Wakefield ResearchCindy Clarke Vice President Marketing, Vital Source Technologies

stats from presentation available here: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/informedia/blog/bytes_books.pdf or http://wcc.on24.com/event/10/30/13/9/rt/1/documents/slidepdf/vitalsource_campustechnologywebcast_finalslidedeck.pdf

methodology: 519 students from 4 years college and u/s

close to what keynote speaker at MN eSummit 2015 shared http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/ David Wiley, MN Learning Commons

students want formally taught life skills: interview for a job, balance checkbook and do taxes, how to take out and pay for student loans

Tennessee:
traditional 4 year school. cost is part of the program, not charged as a course fee. all materials avaiable first day of school and available in perpetuity. way below rental books prices. via LMS (BB). no printed textbooks. few books through websites, for books, which do not subscribe for the program. ebooks offered at the store. increasing titles selection. cost, learning outcomes. the outlook for digital in the future: already digital, but open for further development. expand courses offered, launching more programs with materials bundled and online course.
digital is easier to work with, deliver to customer,
business partnership (this is different now from http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/ David Wiley, MN Learning Commons). working closely with provost, cio, vital source. working with publishers to make sure that content is available>
business model: program bundle all the content and deliver to students and advertise periodically to students
the course fee model: charged to student account semester by semester bases. also student-paid method. all access model is better for everyone.

ebooks are important for the interactivity, collaboration

Q and As:
what was the students’ reaction moving to digital books. how traditional faculty are accepting the change. A: pilot group of several faculty and gradual roll out. early adopters influencing others.
does the content open on all devices? A: yes, device-agnostic. dedicated apps for iOS, Android, and Windows
disability? A: enhanced apps, migrate all PDF format to proprietory platform. epub and PDF content. user added epub content. Center for accessible material innovation, American Foundation for the blind, Tech for All etc
libraries do not provide course materials for students. clean division between campus store and library
BB admin is loading the codes in the LMS, but the idea is to load the information straight into BB. cio in charge. helpdesk support for vital provided by the cio department.
cost savings in percent for students digital to print. student pay model, ebooks can vary to new book price. ebooks even more expensive. with the course fee, 70% off rental. 3rd party operator may add 30%.  all parties must be looking for reasonable margin. greater digital adoption results in lower costs for students.

digital alleviates dropout rate.

what course which don’t fit digital materials. life sciences and mathematics, science and engineering is landing itself well

how much interactive content and links to social media is incorporated.