Archive of ‘academic library’ category

Innovative Pedagogy

Rebecca Ferguson
  • Senior lecturer in the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) at The Open University in the UK
  • Senior fellow of the Higher Education Academy
TODAY, Thursday at 1:00 PM CT
JOIN HERE
This Week:
An interactive discussion on the Innovating Pedagogy 2019 report from The Open University
About the Guest
Rebecca is a senior lecturer in the Institute of Educational Technology (IET) at The Open University in the UK and a senior fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Her primary research interests are educational futures, and how people learn together online and I supervise doctoral students in both these areas.
Rebecca worked for several years as a researcher and educator on the Schome project, which focuses on educational futures, and was also the research lead on the SocialLearn online learning platform, and learning analytics lead on the Open Science Lab (Outstanding ICT Initiative of the Year: THE Awards 2014). She is currently a pedagogic adviser to the FutureLearn MOOC platform, and evaluation lead on The Open University’s FutureLearn MOOCs. She is an active member of the Society for Learning Analytics Research, and have co-chaired many learning analytics events, included several associated with the Learning Analytics Community Exchange (LACE), European Project funded under Framework 7.
Rebecca’s most recent book, Augmented Education, was published by Palgrave in spring 2014.
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My notes
innovative assessment is needed for innovative pedagogy.
Analytics. what is I want to know about my learning (from the learner’s perspective)
Ray Garcelon
How is “stealth assessment” unique compared to formative assessment?
students teaching robots
learning analytics, Rebecca is an authority.
how to assess resources are trustworthy, fake news and social media, navigating post-truth society
how to advance the cause of empathy through technological means
gamification. XR safer environment. digital storytelling and empathy.
poll : learning with robots –
digital literacy and importance for curriculum primary, secondary and post secondary level.
digital literacy is changing every year;
drones
Buckingham Shum, S., & Ferguson, R. (2012). Social Learning Analytics. Educational Technology & Society15(3), 3–26.https://mnpals-scs.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=ericEJ992500&context=PC&vid=01MNPALS_SCS:SCS&search_scope=MyInst_and_CI&tab=Everything&lang=en
Mor, Y., Ferguson, R., & Wasson, B. (2015). Editorial: Learning design, teacher inquiry into student learning and learning analytics: A call for action. British Journal of Educational Technology46(2), 221–229. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12273
Rebecca Ferguson. (2014). Learning Analytics: drivers, developments and challenges. TD Tecnologie Didattiche22(3), 138–147. https://doi.org/10.17471/2499-4324/183
Hansen, C., Emin, V., Wasson, B., Mor, Y., Rodriguez-Triana, M., Dascalu, M., … Pernin, J. (2013). Towards an Integrated Model of Teacher Inquiry into Student Learning, Learning Design and Learning Analytics. Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact – Proceedings of EC-TEL 20138095, 605–606. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-40814-4_73
how to decolonize educational technology: MOOCs coming from the big colonial powers, not from small countries. Video games: many have very colonial perspective
strategies for innovative pedagogies: only certainly groups or aspects taking into account; rarely focus on support by management, scheduling, time tabling, tech support.

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more on future trends in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=future+trends

Beginning Git & GitHub

The session will include practical, hands-on instruction for version control and collaboration in Git, as well as experience building a simple & free website on GitHub!

Beginning Git & GitHub

Friday, June 21  12:00 PM – 4:00 PM  Registration and logisitics 

Work smarter, collaborate faster and share code or other files with the library community using the popular version control system Git. Featuring a mix of git fundamentals and hands-on exercises, participants learn the basics of Git, learn how to use key commands, and how to use GitHub to their advantage, including sharing their own work and building upon the projects of others.

Git is a tool (technically, a version control system) that allows you to easily track changes in your files, scripts, websites, or entire programs. You can run it on your own computer for your own projects, but Git also makes it easy to collaborate with others on shared projects – thus helpful to small teams, large organizations, and people coordinating on open source projects. Easier collaboration is not the only advantage to using Git: you can also easily test out changes and write new code without threatening your existing work. It is very popular – verging on a necessity – amongst coders.

GitHub is a website that allows you to easily host and manage the code for git-tracked projects. It simplifies collaboration among project contributors, and is especially helpful for open source projects where you don’t necessarily meet your fellow contributors in real life. GitHub is free if your code is open to the public.

Bring your laptop for an afternoon of hands on exploration!

More info about the class

 

Heather Klish | Senior Systems Librarian

TTS : Library Technology Services

Tufts University

heather.klish@tufts.edu | 617.627.5853

Elsevier privacy break

Due a to a misconfigured server, a researcher found a constant stream of Elsevier users’ passwords.

By Joseph Cox | Mar 18 2019, 1:09pm

https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/vbw8b9/elsevier-user-passwords-exposed-online

Elsevier is controversial, after acquiring a number of platforms that distributed academic material for free. Profit-driven Elsevier’s legal threats against other sites that openly host millions of scientific papers have forced them to go into the digital underground, and distribute their material with the protection of the Tor anonymity network. Some universities have boycotted Elsevier.

Psychodynamics of Bullying in Libraries

The Psychodynamics of Bullying in Libraries
Steven W. Staninger

https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/article/view/7170/6381

Bullying in the workplace has been defined as:
The repeated actions and practices (of a perpetrator) that are directed to one or more
workers, which are unwanted by the victim, which may be done deliberately, or
unconsciously, but clearly cause humiliation, offense, distress, may interfere with job
performance, and/or cause an unpleasant working environment.

Bullying most often occurs within an organization where negative aspects of that
organizations’ culture aggregate.

The challenge for the library administrator is to identify where these accumulations are, and take steps to re-create the culture of that area and change the systems that allow bullying to occur. This is an essential function of an effective administraton

Bullies will almost always deny that what they are doing is bullying, particularly when the stated goal – or directive sent down from higher administrators – is to
move the organization “forward.”

Bullying includes but is not limited to unreasonable criticism of job performance, attempts to
control workplace interactions between peers, and creating unwritten policies. Other bullying
behaviors include assigning unrealistic workloads, ignoring and ridiculing suggestions about
library operations, and excessive monitoring that leaves employees excluded and isolated, not to mention exhausted.

Librarians would do well to honestly reflect and determine if they are participating in
bullying behaviors, and/or are watching it happen without attempting to take steps to call it out
for what it is.

Library administrators should be vigilant about identifying bullying and addressing it before it becomes ingrained in the institutional culture.

As Reed notes, “Toxic leadership, like leadership in general, is more easily described then
defined, but terms like self-aggrandizing, petty, abusive, indifferent to unit climate, and
interpersonally malicious seem to capture the concept.” 17 Distressingly, a library with a culture of bullying corrupts those who serve it, marginalizing those with initiative and new ideas and rewarding the sycophants. Ultimately, bullying creates a continuous fear of failure, so people work to avoid being bullied instead of attending to their assigned tasks. The result is an ineffective library that falls well short of its intended mission

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more on bullying in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bullying

Genrefication School Libraries Like Bookstores

How Genrefication Makes School Libraries More Like Bookstores

Gail Cornwall Jul 22, 2018 https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51336/how-genrefication-makes-school-libraries-more-like-bookstores

Under the Dewey Decimal System that revolutionized and standardized book shelving starting in 1876, nonfiction essentially already gets the genrefication treatment with, for example, Music located in the 780s and Paleontology in the 560s. Yet most fiction is shelved in one big clump alphabetized by author’s last name.

Many librarians say the “search hurdle” imposed by Dewey classification (a system originally designed for adults) significantly reduces the odds of a child finding something new they’re likely to enjoy. In a genrefied library, on the other hand, a young reader standing near a favorite book need only stick out a hand to find more like it. (It’s a bit like the analog version of Amazon’s recommendation feature: “Customers who bought this item also bought”)

The Dewey-loyal also oppose genrefication in principle for, interestingly enough, the same reason others support it: self-sufficiency. Sure, they argue, kids might be better able to find a book independently in their school library, but what happens when they go to the public one? When they get to high school?

The debate has led to compromise positions. Some leave books for older students in the Dewey arrangement while genrefying for younger ones. Other librarians rearrange middle readers and young adult books but leave picture books shelved by author since it can be unclear how to categorize a story about a duck driving a tractor.

blockchain for academic libraries

An interesting discussion on the use of blockchain for academic libraries on the LITA listserv

in response to a request from the Library Association in Pakistan for an hour long session on “block chain and its applications for Academic Libraries”.

While Nathan Schwartz, MSIS Systems & Reference Librarian find blockchain only related to cryptocurrencies, Jason Griffey offers a MOOC focused on Blockchain for the Information Professions: https://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains/

According to Jason, “Blockchain, as a data storage technology, can be separated from the idea of cryptocurrencies and expressions of value and coin.”

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

Conference on Digital Libraries

CM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries
June 2-6, 2019 – Urbana-Champaign, IL
Curated Knowledge. Connected People. Extraordinary Results.
UPDATED DEADLINE: January 25, 2019
JCDL welcomes interesting submissions ranging across theories, systems,
services, and applications. We invite those managing, operating, developing,
curating, evaluating, or utilizing digital libraries broadly defined, covering
academic or public institutions, including archives, museums, and social
networks. We seek involvement of those in iSchools, as well as working in
computer or information or social sciences and technologies. Multiple tracks
and sessions will ensure tailoring to researchers, practitioners, and diverse
communities including data science/analytics, data curation/stewardship,
information retrieval, human-computer interaction, hypertext (and Web/network
science), multimedia, publishing, preservation, digital humanities, machine
learning/AI, heritage/culture, health/medicine, policy, law, and privacy/
intellectual property.
Additional Topics of Interest:
In addition to the topics indicated above, the following are some of the many
topics that will be considered relevant, as long as connections are made to
digital libraries:
* Collaborative and participatory information environments
* Crowdsourcing and human computation
* Cyberinfrastructure architectures, applications, and deployments
* Distributed information systems
* Document genres
* Extracting semantics, entities, and patterns from large collections
* Information and knowledge systems
* Information visualization
* Infrastructure and service design
* Knowledge discovery
* Linked data and its applications
* Performance evaluation
* Personal digital information management
* Scientific data management
* Social media, architecture, and applications
* Social networks, virtual organizations and networked information
* User behavior and modeling
* User communities and user research
We invite submissions in many forms: short papers, long papers, panels,
posters, tutorials, and workshops. We also host a Doctoral Consortium.
Submission Deadlines:
Jan. 25, 2019 – Tutorial, workshop, full paper and short paper, and consortium
submissions
Jan. 29, 2019 – Panel, poster and demonstration submissions
Submissions are to be made in electronic format via the conference’s EasyChair
submission page. Please see the conference website for more details:
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2F2019.jcdl.org%2F&data=01%7C01%7Cpmiltenoff%40stcloudstate.edu%7C51f8325dcd444ea9051b08d67affde34%7C5e40e2ed600b4eeaa9851d0c9dcca629%7C0&sdata=RaBtwLMPYb0gwcqsXHHXsNODc1UrU3w3BFtI7uMgtKY%3D&reserved=0
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Complexity A Leader’s Framework

Complexity: A Leader’s Framework for Understanding and Managing Change in Higher Education

George Siemens, Shane Dawson and Kristen Eshleman
Monday, October 29, 2018

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/10/complexity-a-leaders-framework-for-understanding-and-managing-change-in-higher-education

The relationships between jobs, locality, families, housing, work and government policy, tax processes, crime, psychology, environment, access to education, and urban planning interact and converge in what is known as a Complex Adaptive System (CAS).

definition: Complexity can be understood as a theory of change and adaptation that details how change occurs within systems as well as the principles and mindsets needed to flourish in turbulent environments

he complexification of higher education is an intentional goal of engaging with complexity rather than attempting to reduce it to its constituent parts. Effective vision generation, planning, and goal achievement in the modern uncertain economic-social-technical environment benefits from embracing complexity and the utilization of strategies and actions that reflect a CAS.

ive principles of complexity science are of particular relevance to the higher education system. These attributes—networks, emergence, self-organization and social coordination, feedback sensitivity, and agility—are sufficient to provide higher education leaders with an entry into complexity science as a means of observing, understanding, and interacting with change.

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more on leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ed+leadership

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