Archive of ‘contemplative pedagogy’ category

Mindfulness in curriculum

Mindfulness And Meditation Will Now Be Part Of The Curriculum In 370 Schools In England
March 29, 2019

Read More: https://www.trueactivist.com/mindfulness-and-meditation-will-now-be-part-of-the-curriculum-in-370-schools-in-england-t1/?utm_source=TA&utm_medium=Organic&utm_campaign=TA-t1-MindfulnessMeditation-TAfb&fbclid=IwAR3lYe82p_jpiH3rjkr9ENgyN5BQhaAeXgblvXZkxpPLjhgszJQ1X76fs18

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NYT Feb 4, 2019

a news release announcing the program.The initiative comes months after a survey commissioned by the National Health Service found that one in eight children in England between the ages of 5 and 19 suffered from at least one mental disorder at the time of their assessment in 2017.

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https://www.mindful.org/why-schools-in-england-are-teaching-mindfulness/

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MISP (Mindfulness in Schools Project)
https://mindfulnessinschools.org/teach-dot-b/dot-b-curriculum/

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https://www.mindfulschools.org/training/mindful-educator-essentials/

prime the brain for learning

Activities That Prime the Brain for Learning

Brain breaks and focused attention practices help students feel relaxed and alert and ready to learn.

BRAIN BREAKS

FOCUSED ATTENTION PRACTICES

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more on mindfulness in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindfulness

Mindfulness And Trauma-Informed Teaching

Why Mindfulness And Trauma-Informed Teaching Don’t Always Go Together

Katrina Schwartz Published on 

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/52881/why-mindfulness-and-trauma-informed-teaching-dont-always-go-together

Teachers are turning to the practice as a simple way to restore calm to the classroom, help students find some quiet space, and build self-regulation skills. Some teachers say their personal mindfulness practicehas helped them respond more calmly to students and helps them keep perspective.

“This isn’t about calming down,” said Sam Himelstein, a clinical psychologist, trainer and author who has spent most of his career working with incarcerated youth. “Calming down is great and it is a skill that youth can get better at. But if we’re talking about mindfulness, at its core, we are just talking about being present with whatever it is.”

Larry Rosenberg the dog-mind versus the lion-mind.
Reacting with the mind of a lion allows a person to say, “I’m angry right now,” and that little bit of metacognitive space between the person and the thought allows them to choose how to respond.

TRAUMA SENSITIVE MINDFULNESS

  • Students don’t take the activity seriously
  • Students are triggered by silence because it feels like a storm is brewing, so they don’t want to be quiet
  • Students feel too many requests are made of them without the requisite trust being built up
  • Students exhibit avoidance behavior

Guidelines for teachers using mindfulness:

  • Don’t force it
  • Don’t focus on the logistics like sitting with eyes closed
  • Somatic awareness, like counting breaths, could be a good place to start. “There’s different types of awareness. Sometimes we’re really aware of what’s going on in the mind and sometimes we’re more aware of what’s going on in the body,” Himelstein said.
  • Think about the child’s window of tolerance and whether he is already triggered or not. “It’s good to strike when the iron is cold in a lot of these cases,” Himelstein said.
  • Build relationships

SELF CARE

Cultivating a trauma-informed classroom is much harder when educators themselves are burnt out. Building relationships, not reacting defensively to student behavior and taking time to listen to students can feel nearly impossible if the adult is barely making it through the day.

several categories of self-care, according to Himelstein:

  1. Regular cultivation of relaxation response (3Rs): things like watching TV, going into nature, getting a massage.
  2. Effortful training: These are things like more sustained meditation or exercise where the payoff comes over a longer time period.
  3. Creativity: something that gives purpose and adds vibrancy to life. Writing, reading, painting or other passions are examples.
  4. Advocacy: everything from learning to say “No” (set boundaries), to working at a higher level to impact policy or structural change.

Steve Hoover on mindfulness

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#SteveHoover on #mindfulness don’t miss it

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@Steve Hoover presenting in #mindfulness

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, January 23, 2019

 

How To Raise a Child Who Cares

How To Raise a Child Who Cares

https://blog.ed.ted.com/2018/12/14/how-to-raise-a-child-who-cares/

Daniel J. Siegel is clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, the founding co-director of the UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center, and executive director of the Mindsight Institute. He is also the author of several books, including the New York Times bestsellers “Brainstorm” and, with Tina Payne Bryson, “The Whole-Brain Child” and “No-Drama Discipline.”

Tina Payne Bryson is a pediatric and adolescent psychotherapist and the Founder and Executive Director of The Center for Connection in Pasadena, California. She is also is the co-author, with Daniel J. Siegel, of the New York Times bestsellers “The Whole-Brain Child” and “No-Drama Discipline.”

Nelson, B. W., Parker, S. C., & Siegel, D. J. (2014). Interpersonal neurobiology, mindsight, and integration: The mind, relationships, and the brain. In K. Brandt, B. D. Perry, S. Seligman, & E. Tronick (Eds.), Infant and early childhood mental health: Core concepts and clinical practice. (pp. 129–144). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. Retrieved from http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpsyh%26AN%3d2014-01143-008%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Siegel, D. J. (2012). The developing mind: How relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are, 2nd ed. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Retrieved from http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpsyh%26AN%3d2012-12726-000%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Siegel, D. J. (2001). Toward an interpersonal neurobiology of the developing mind: Attachment relationships, “mindsight,” and neural integration. Infant Mental Health Journal22(1/2), 67–94. Retrieved from http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d11772284%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Siegel, D. J. (2004). Attachment and Self-Understanding: Parenting with the Brain in Mind. Journal of Prenatal & Perinatal Psychology & Health18(4), 273–285. Retrieved from http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpsyh%26AN%3d2004-17965-002%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

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more on empathy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=empathy

mental health day for teachers

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More on contemplative practices in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative

meditation and education
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=meditation+education

mindfulness
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mindful

 

yoga by Western doctors

Why More Western Doctors Are Now Prescribing Yoga Therapy

With a growing body of research proving yoga’s healing benefits, it’s no wonder more Western doctors are prescribing this ancient practice. Learn what’s behind the trend.

SUSAN ENFIELDFEB 3, 2016

https://www.yogajournal.com/lifestyle/western-doctors-prescribing-yoga-therapy

With a growing body of research proving yoga’s healing benefits, it’s no wonder more doctors—including those with traditional Western training—are prescribing this ancient practice to their patients.

Yoga therapy is now recognized as a clinically viable treatment, with established programs at major health care centers, such as The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, and many others. In 2003, there were just five yoga-therapy training programs in the International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT) database. Today, there are more than 130 worldwide, including 24 rigorous multi-year programs newly accredited by IAYT, with 20 more under review. According to a 2015 survey, most IAYT members work in hospital settings, while others work in outpatient clinics or physical therapy, oncology, or rehabilitation departments (and in private practice).

Some therapists focus on physical mechanics, while others bring in Ayurvedic healing principles and factor in diet, psychological health, and spirituality to create a holistic, customized plan.

“Researchers take blood samples before and after yoga practice to see which genes have been turned on and which were deactivated,” says Khalsa. “We’re also able to see which areas of the brain are changing in structure and size due to yoga and meditation.” This kind of research is helping take yoga into the realm of “real science,” he says, by showing how the practice changes psycho-physiological function.

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more on contemplative practices in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative

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