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Archive for the 'e-learning' Category

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 14th June 2014

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

http://elearningindustry.com/5-tips-for-elearning-voice-recording

These are the top 5 frequent e-Learning voice recording situations that I’ve come across:

  1. A.C.R.O.N.Y.M.S.
    Is this pronounced A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S or ‘acronyms’? Is it read as letters or read as a word? A lot of scripts do have acronyms related to company or industry jargon. Define this in the script to avoid confusion and save re-records! You can use ALL CAPS but that may not be enough. Periods or dashes between letters (A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S) generally indicate the word to be read as individual letters. But to be safe, put explanation notes in the margin or at the top of the script defining correct pronunciation, to reduce risk.
  2. Audio file – technical specifications
    If you hire a voice talent to record for you, usually you ask for either mp3 or wav audio files back from her. But are you also specifying the bit rate? 16 bit resolution is the gold standard. If you get 24 bit, your audio may sound garbled but only after it’s embedded into your program. Save time and trouble upfront by stating your audio tech specs!
  3. Attitude or Point Of View
    What kind of attitude do you want to hear in the voice recording? Think about the end listener. What will peak their interest and attentiveness more? By taking the small amount of time to define the “who is talking” and “to whom”, you can help the person recording to provide a POV (point of view) with the right attitude. Plus, it’s a great way to provide impact and underscore the project for the client. This is a gem – often unused! For example, is this a co-worker talking to her peers or (differently) is she showing a new person the ropes? Is this an SME (subject matter expert) sharing expert information? To whom – Top management or research engineers? If your project is required information, like an annual safety review or similar, it can often be very dry material. Taking a couple minutes to think about the role of who delivers such information can energize dry material. Some more general examples of attitude can be: Strong and Authoritative. Caring and Conversational. Casual like a co-worker. Blue collar vs white collar.
  4. Proximity
    Another gem of a different color! A voice recording can be done further or closer to the microphone. We call that ‘proximity’. This can change or impact the way a listener responds. Compare whispering vs talking at a cubicle vs presenting to a room of people. Changing ‘proximity’ can create poignant moments that listeners will notice. Let your clients know about this technique as well. Used sparingly = high impact!
  5. Script Writing flow – or Writing with listening in mind
    After all the information is written, review the script for a flow of words that, when read aloud, are easy to comprehend and will engage the listener. This may be hard to find time for, depending on your client’s budget – but it is one of those quality elements that can win you a client’s loyalty. When I see a line or two in a script that I think can be phrased to flow more conversationally, I might offer it as an alternate.

Posted in audio editing, e-learning, mobile learning, online learning, technology | No Comments »

Backchannel: is it only K12 moving that direction?

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 28th May 2014

backchannel – a digital conversation that runs concurrently with a face-to-face activity — provides students with an outlet to engage in conversation.

In a recent article by Edutopia:
The Backchannel: Giving Every Student a Voice in the Blended Mobile Classroom. (n.d.). Edutopia. Retrieved May 28, 2014, from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/backchannel-student-voice-blended-classroom-beth-holland

the author brings yet another argument in support of using the BYOD movement in K12 to promote usage of mobile devices and social media FOR the learning process, rather then seeking ways to shut them off.
It seems that Higher Ed is lagging behind in their paradigm shift toward Backchanneling.
What do you think must be done at SCSU to seek the usage of mobile devices and/or social media to involved students in the learning process?

Posted in e-learning, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

MANAGING ONLINE COURSE WORKLOAD

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 8th May 2014

MANAGING ONLINE COURSE WORKLOAD

http://www.academicimpressions.com/PDF/pdf_serve.php?i=1804&q=24756q203944kR102

Posted in Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, hybrid learning, mobile learning, online learning, student-centered learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

10 technology hallmarks for every campus

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st May 2014

10 technology hallmarks for every campus

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/technology-hallmarks-campus-099

1. High-speed wireless broadband.

According to the Center for Digital Education’s recent “2013 Yearbook: Technology Innovation in Education,” over 80 percent of education institutions surveyed said that wireless broadband was their “top priority for IT investment.”

2. 24/7 IT support.

We have 24/7 support for emergencies and much of our staff, just like at a hospital, are on call. That’s not a perk for the campus, it’s a necessity.

3. The cloud.

The cloud can also: acquire and implement the latest software and application updates; streamline enrollment and admissions processes; and turn to subscriptions that are scalable and provide options, says Edudemic.

4. Digital textbooks.

Planning for digital textbooks means not only boosting mobile device capabilities on campus, but helping faculty learn to implement digital resources into their course.

5. 21st Century PD for faculty and admin.

From offering a MOOC on classroom management online solutions, to hosting a PD session on Twitter, campus admin should offer multiple options for PD delivery, just like how faculty should offer students multiple options for learning–there’s no better way to teach something than to model it first!

6. MOOCs.

[Read: “3 pros and 3 cons of MOOCs.”]

7. Online course management system.

From sending in-class emails to checking grades, course management systems, like Blackboard, offer faculty and students a fairly intuitive way to manage courses more efficiently.

8. Big Data…

Future-proofing universities are beginning to deploy storage solutions to help manage the unstructured data in physical, virtual and cloud environments. More modern storage solutions are also open source for a high learning curve but low cost.

9…security.

precautions can range from scanning existing databases on the university’s servers to determine where personal information is located and then, depending on the database, destroy the personal information or add more digital security; as well as put cybersecurity systems through a series of penetration tests to highlight security shortcomings.

[Read: “University data breach prompts ‘top-to-bottom’ IT review.”]

10. Social media done well.

of the major ways campuses use social media well is by serving up both “cake” and “broccoli,” or balancing the content that is important and good for the school (broccoli) and the content that is fun and delicious (cake). “If you share enough cake, your audience will consume the occasional broccoli,” she advises.

Posted in Cybersecurity, Desire2Learn (D2L), distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, E-Learning Authoring Tool, educational technology, information technology, learning, mobile apps, mobile learning, MOOC, mooc, online learning, social media, teaching | No Comments »

E-learning missing pieces and Four Essential Principles of Blended Learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 26th April 2014

E-learning missing pieces

Smiley face

http://www.designelearn.com/news/elearnings-missing-pieces-infographic/

Four Essential Principles of Blended Learning

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/08/four-essential-principles-of-blended-learning/

1.  EVERY SCHOOL NEEDS A VISION.

2.  ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL.

3.  DON’T LET SOFTWARE DICTATE LEARNING GOALS.

4.  SUPPORT TEACHERS AND INCLUDE THEM IN DECISION-MAKING PROCESS.

Need assistance with restructuring your F2F course to hybrid and online one? Please consider us:

InforMedia Services

informedia@stcloudstate.edu

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

trhergert@stcloudstate.edu

Contact us via social media:

IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

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Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

Posted in distance learning, e-learning, educational technology, hybrid learning, learning, online learning | No Comments »

Peer to peer online tutoring: practical and empirical results

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 19th April 2014

https://www.brainfuse.com/home/peers.asp

http://www.magazine.utoronto.ca/life-on-campus/donny-ouyang-online-peer-tutoring/

https://peers.aristotlecircle.com/page/1-to-1-in-home-tutoring

http://study-guide-services-review.toptenreviews.com/what-is-peer-to-peer-tutoring.html

http://www.azcentral.com/news/arizona/articles/20130426education-nation-peer-tutoring-gets-high-tech-makeover.html

http://jobs.aol.com/videos/job-search/rayku-p2p-online-tutoring-program-startup-presentation/517175995/

Peer reviewed (please consider LRS online dbase to retrieve):
Westera, W., De Bakker, G., & Wagemans, L. (2009). Self-arrangement of fleeting student pairs: a Web 2.0 approach for peer tutoring. Interactive Learning Environments17(4), 341-349. doi:10.1080/10494820903195249

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d45141111%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

http://ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/mcloughlin.html
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036013150600090X

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0740818807000448

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S8755461507000734

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02602930410001689144#.U1J_MvldWSo

Interesting conference proceedings:
Gaofeng, R., & Yeyu, L. (2007). An Online Peer Assisted Learning Community Model and its Application in ZJNU.Online Submission,

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dED500172%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

A model to consider, if you have a higher ed instution in the vicinity and replace freshman students with K12 ones. I like how the authors further classified the tutors into 3 categories:

De Smet, M., Van Keer, H., & Valcke, M. (2008). Blending asynchronous discussion groups and peer tutoring in higher education: An exploratory study of online peer tutoring behaviour. Computers & Education50207-223. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2006.05.001

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/eds/detail?vid=4&sid=2fae304e-fee9-4a4f-8119-386670956bbb%40sessionmgr111&hid=106&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=edselp&AN=S036013150600090X

This is the foundation, which the startup companies from Sillicon Valley are using to make money:
Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., Kester, L., & Sloep, P. (2013). Cognitive load and knowledge sharing in Learning Networks. Interactive Learning Environments21(1), 89-100. doi:10.1080/10494820.2010.548068

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this is old, but you can take the concepts and apply them right toward your research of using CAI
Dewey, D. P., & Cannon, A. E. (2006). Supporting technology instruction through peer tutoring, discussion boards and electronic journals. IALLT Journal Of Language Learning Technologies38(2), 17.

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this one goes towad
Mengping, T. (2014). Mathematics Synchronous Peer Tutoring System for Students with Learning Disabilities.Journal Of Educational Technology & Society17(1), 115-127.

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Tsuei, M. (2012). Using Synchronous Peer Tutoring System to Promote Elementary Students’ Learning in Mathematics. Computers & Education58(4), 1171-1182.

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Posted in Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, Multiple intelligences, online learning, student-centered learning, teaching, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

literature on online teaching

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 22nd January 2014

A former SCSU faculty asked me to help her with literature regarding online learning; she is applying to teach complete online somewhere in the South.

Hey Plamen, Do you have any reading suggestions regarding teaching online? I am applying for a job at ?????? and the program is completely online. I want to be current with the literature if I happen to get an interview.

Hey ???,

It is a simple question, with ever growing complex answer. 2013 was announced as the “MOOC” year and that term literally killed the tag “online education.” Most of the literature on online teaching now is subdued one way or another under MOOC.

However, there are still authors, who are widely cited as “foundational.” E.g.: Susan Ko, Paloff and Pratt

Ko, S., & Rossen, S. (2010). Teaching Online: A Practical Guide. Taylor & Francis.

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2010). Collaborating Online: Learning Together in Community. John Wiley & Sons.

Palloff, R. M., & Pratt, K. (2009). Assessing the Online Learner: Resources and Strategies for Faculty. John Wiley & Sons.

Moore, M. G., & Kearsley, G. (2005). Distance education: A systems view (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth. http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic541040.files/Moore%20Theoretical%20Basis%20for%20Distance%20Education.pdf

Moore, M. G. (2013). Handbook of Distance Education. Routledge.

There is a long list of articles, which I am collecting through the years. You can peruse them and choose any further readings, if you want…

 

Adolphus, M. (2009). USING THE WEB TO teach information literacy. Online, 33(4), 20-25.

Andersen, M. H. (2011). The world is my school: Welcome to the era of personalized learning. Futurist, 45(1), 12-17.

Borja, R. R. (2004). New player in online school market pursues profits. Education Week, 24(15), 8-8.

Brooks-Kirkland, A. (2006). Podcasting for learning. School Libraries in Canada (17108535), 25(4), 44-48.

Ćukušić, M., Alfirević, N., Granić, A., & Garača, Ž. (2010). e-learning process management and the e-learning performance: Results of a european empirical study. Computers & Education, 55(2), 554-565.

Ćukušić, M., Alfirević, N., Granić, A., & Garača, Ž. (2010). e-learning process management and the e-learning performance: Results of a european empirical study. Computers & Education, 55(2), 554-565.

Ćukušić, M., Alfirević, N., Granić, A., & Garača, Ž. (2010). e-learning process management and the e-learning performance: Results of a european empirical study. Computers & Education, 55(2), 554-565.

de Freitas, S., & Veletsianos, G. (2010). Editorial: Crossing boundaries: Learning and teaching in virtual worlds. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 3-9.

Department of education report: Its importance, one year later. (cover story).(2010). Distance Education Report, 15(12), 1-7.

Falloon, G. (2010). Using avatars and virtual environments in learning: What do they have to offer? British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 108-122.

Hrastinski, S., Keller, C., & Carlsson, S. A. (2010). Design exemplars for synchronous e-learning: A design theory approach. Computers & Education, 55(2), 652-662.

Karagiorgi, Y., & Symeou, L. (2005). Translating constructivism into instructional design: Potential and limitations. Educational Technology & Society, 8(1), 17-27.

Keengwe, J., Schnellert, G., & Miltenoff, P. (2011). Technology and globalization in higher education., 2535-2538.

Ketelhut, D. J., Nelson, B. C., Clarke, J., & Dede, C. (2010). A multi-user virtual environment for building and assessing higher order inquiry skills in science. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(1), 56-68.

Kim, P., Ng, C. K., & Lim, G. (2010). When cloud computing meets with semantic web: A new design for e-portfolio systems in the social media era. British Journal of Educational Technology,41(6), 1018-1028.

Kolowich, S. (2009). MIT tops world ranking of university web sites. Chronicle of Higher Education, 55(24), A15-A15.

Leach, J. (2008). Do new information and communications technologies have a role to play in the achievement of education for all? British Educational Research Journal, 34(6), 783-805.

Levine, A., Levine, A., & Dean, D. R. (2012). Generation on a tightrope : A portrait of today’s college student. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Mangu-Ward, K. (2010). Teachers unions vs. online education. Reason, 42(4), 44-50.

Nistor, N., & Neubauer, K. (2010). From participation to dropout: Quantitative participation patterns in online university courses. Computers & Education, 55(2), 663-672.

Ramig, R. (2009). Social media in the classroom. Multimedia & internet@schools, 16(6), 8-10.

Ramig, R. (2009). Social media in the classroom. Multimedia & internet@schools, 16(6), 8-10.

Schiller, K. (2009). Augmented reality comes to market. (cover story). Information Today, 26(11), 1-46.

Šumak, B., Heričko, M., & Pušnik, M. (2011). A meta-analysis of e-learning technology acceptance: The role of user types and e-learning technology types. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(6), 2067-2077.

Tallent-Runnels, M., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y., Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M., et al. (2006). Teaching courses online: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 76(1), 93-135.

Tallent-Runnels, M., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y., Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M., et al. (2006). Teaching courses online: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 76(1), 93-135.

Tallent-Runnels, M., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y., Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M., et al. (2006). Teaching courses online: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 76(1), 93-135.

Wang, H., & Shao, M. (2008). Desire2Learn for quality matters., 1335-1339.

 

 

Posted in e-learning, educational technology, mobile learning, mooc, online learning | 1 Comment »

10 Fundamental Apps for Your New iPad

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 2nd January 2014

10 Fundamental Apps for Your New iPad

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/01/10-fundamental-apps-for-your-new-ipad.html?m=1

1- Dropbox

Besides  Google Drive App, Dropbox is a great cloud storage platform that you can use for free. When you sign up you get 2GB of space for free and you can upgrade for more. Dropbox lets you save all your pictures, files, and documents into easily arranged folders and access them anywhere you are with internet connection and across different devices. its syncing capabilities are also great.

2- Evernote

This list would  not be complete without Evernote. This app is definitely a must have. It allows you to take notes on the go and sync them across different devices and platforms. Evernote is also a wonderful bookmarking tool that you can use to save and  curate web content.

3- Gmail

This is the official Gmail app for iPad. The new update brought to Gmail app some new useful functionalities including: multiple account support, real time notification, and search across the entire inbox.

4- Penultimate

This is a wonderful app for digital handwriting. It allows you to handwrite on your iPad, take notes, write on pictures, zoom in on a spot and illustrate it. When you are done you can store your note into your Evernote account and access it from anywhere with internet connection.

5- Paper

Wanna unleash your creativity on iPad, give Paper a try. This is an app that enables you to create drawings, illustrations, notes, sketches, diagrams and share them with your students and colleagues.

6- Chrome

Chrome is my favourite browser for iPad. Safari is also a good option but I like Chrome the most because  I find it to be fast, loads quicker and is user friendly.

7- Flipboard

Flipboard is a great personal magazine. You can use it to catch up on the news you care abut. You can add popular publications like New York Times or add the feeds of your favourite websites and blogs. Flipboard also enables you to stay updated about the news and feeds coming from your social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, Thumblr, and Instagram and all in a beautiful magazine style experience.

8- Skitch

This is the app I use to illustrate pictures I take with my iPad camera. Skitch  allows you to capture a picture or use  the ones you have in your camera roll and write or draw on them before sharing them with others.

9- Twitter

This is the official iPad app for Twitter. It is pretty basic because it’s free but if you want a sophisticated Twitter app then go for Tweetbot ($2,99). I personally use the free one.

10- Kindle

 

Posted in e-learning, information technology, instructional technology, iPAD, mobile apps | No Comments »

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th November 2013

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats

This past week, I had the privilege of introducing US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, as a guest moderator for #edtechchat, an educational Twitter chat that I founded with four members of my personal learning network (PLN).  Over the course of 60 minutes, almost 2,000 people from around the world, shared about 10,000 tweets in response to the Secretary’s six questions related to being a Connected Educator.  Secretary Duncan (@arneduncan) and his Office of Educational Technology (@officeofedtech) deemed October “Connected Educator’s Month” for the second straight year.  To close #ce13, Secretary Duncan used the #edtechchat forum to engage in conversation with educators from all over the world.

In reflecting on the chat, many people asked how to get started, and how to possibly follow such a quick flow of information. For one, 10,000 tweets in an hour is by no means typical; but then again, neither is the opportunity to interact with the US Secretary of Education. Although this particular chat with the Secretary may be an extreme example of what possibilities can arise when connecting with others online, each week there are over 160 chats that occur.  Virtually all topics are covered in some fashion. Whether you’re a 4th grade teacher (#4thchat) in Maryland (#mdedchat), a principal (#cpchat) in Arkansas (#arkedchat), a new teacher (#ntchat) in Rhode Island (#edchatri), or a parent (#ptchat) connecting on a Saturday (#satchat), there’s something for you.

This Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats was created as part of the Digital Learning Transition MOOC (#dltmooc), an online “Massive Open Online Course”, developed by The Alliance for Education (@All4Ed) and the Friday Institute (@FridayInstitute) as part of Project 24 (@all4edproject24).  Feel free to download and share the Quick Start resource to help educators get started.

Furthermore, the Official Chat List was created by Chad Evans (@cevans5095) and me (@thomascmurray), with help from our good friend Jerry Blumengarten (@cybraryman1). This resource (shortcut: bit.ly/officialchatlist) is a comprehensive list of the educational Twitter chats that take place each week.

Start small. Choose a chat that peaks your interest. Lurk, listen, and learn. When you’re ready, jump in head first.  Grow your PLN and get connected through a Twitter chat this week!  Your students will benefit.

- See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats#sthash.W1DPfmY1.dpuf

Posted in collaboration and creativity, e-learning, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, MOOC, mooc, online learning, open learning, pedagogy, social media, student-centered learning, technology, technology literacy, Twitter | No Comments »

Mobile Learning Could Be Key in Achievement Gap Equation

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th November 2013

Mobile Learning Could Be Key in Achievement Gap Equation

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/01/mobile-learning-could-be-key-in-achievement-gap/

Research tells us the following:

  • Mobile phone ownership is highest in minority populations
  • Social media use is highest and most valued in minority populations
  • Online learning has its highest approval rate in minority populations

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, hybrid learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, social media | No Comments »