Archive of ‘e-learning’ category

synchronous online learning

Creating Collaborative, Interactive & Engaging Online Learning Environments with Shindig

Shindig Interactive Video Chat for Canvas LMS, February 6, 2:00 – 3:00pm (EST)

Shindig recently announced its integration with Canvas by Instructure, bringing the former’s video chat platform to the learning management system.

Attend this webinar to learn how instructors can instantly schedule, customize and launch Shindig sessions directly from within the Canvas LMS, as well as automatically add the video chat sessions to students’ schedules.

Learn about the positive impact of collaborative and interactive learning environments on student success first-hand from educators and instructional technologists from leading universities. This session will highlight different use cases Shindig can be utilized for, including course delivery, office hours, guest speakers, workshops and more.

Early adopters of the Shindig platform will also be sharing highlight videos of their use of the platform and answering questions attendees may have.

Shindig Early Adopter Guest Speakers:

  • Michael AngillettaProfessor & Senior Sustainability Scholar, Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs, Arizona State University

Note: Watch the brief tutorial video, Canvas for Shindig

The Shindig Canvas plugin is available for free on a public GitHub Repo. Once the plugin is installed in the university’s LMS, IT administrators can contact Shindig for an API key to enable the creation of on-demand Shindig sessions in Canvas. The company is offering each Canvas client institution 10 free Shindig sessions of up to 1,000 attendees.
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First-time users: upon entering the room, click “Allow” to the Flash prompt requesting access to your webcam. (Chrome users may need to click Allow a second time).

Note: The Shindig app currently only supports interacting with the featured speakers through text. To fully enjoy the Shindig experience and be enabled to ask video chat questions of the speaker or video chat privately with other participants, please log in from a computer with webcam and microphone capabilities.

Netlix and HBO on VR

Netflix and HBO launch virtual reality apps on Google Play

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More on on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=vr

Internet Access

Across The Atlantic, Glimpse An Alternate Internet Universe

http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2014/04/09/301028037/across-the-atlantic-glimpse-an-alternate-internet-universe

a moment when the U.S. decided to go one way and the rest of the world went another

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more on Internet Access in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=internet+access

audio recording

TwistedWave for Education

TwistedWave is an audio recording and editing tool that is included in Next Vista’s list of recommended tools. Through TwistedWave you can create and edit spoken audio recordings from scratch. Your completed tracks can be exported to Google Drive and SoundCloud.

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more on audio recordings in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=audio+record

Credly Badges on Canvas

Credly Badges Now Available Through Canvas

By Rhea Kelly 01/09/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/09/credly-badges-now-available-through-canvas.aspx

Students can now earn digital badges when they complete modules in Canvas, thanks to a new partnership between Credly and the learning management system from Instructure.

“Digital badges are a powerful and employer-friendly complement to grades and other information traditionally found on a college transcript,” said Brenda Perea, instructional design project manager at Colorado Community College System, which deployed an early pilot of Credly Learning Edition for Canvas.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

synchronous vs asynchronous

From the The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>

Can you recommend a peer-reviewed research article that addresses the learning outcomes/learning effectiveness of asynchronous vs. synchronous teaching approaches in online courses?

We have a program that has required weekly synchronous sessions (held via Bb Collaborate) that support the otherwise asynchronous courses in the program. The department is considering making that requirement optional to accommodate worldwide learners, but there are faculty who are concerned about the impact to the learning and transfer of knowledge to the students.

Any research that addresses the differences in these teaching modalities when it comes to learning outcomes?

Thanks in advance,     Kristen     Kristen Brown     Assistant Director, Online Learning     Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning

I am happy to share my own dissertation research which specifically focused on this topic as well. Please email me and I will share. andy.black@nurs.utah.edu
My note: I emailed Andy and will attach his dissertation to this blog, if interest

final-dissertation-andy-black-asynchronous-synchronous

On Behalf Of Henri Moser
Sent: Friday, January 06, 2017 8:35 AM

Here is a link to my dissertation which centered on synchronous academic support for online graduate students.Best,Henri

http://dune.une.edu/theses/56/

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more on synchronous online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=synchronous

instructional design librarian

Conversations With Blended Librarians: The Evolving Instructional Design Librarian now available

Published on

Joelle Pitts is an Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor at Kansas State University Libraries. She is responsible for the creation and maintenance of web-based learning objects and environments aimed at improving the information literacy of the Kansas State University community. She leads the New Literacies Alliance, an inter-institutional information literacy consortium. Her research interests include distance education and e-learning theory and design, library user experience (UX), as well as the design and implementation of games-based learning environments.

The view the recorded session visit http://blendedlibrarian.learningtimes.net/

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more on blended librarian in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+librarian

cartoons humor learning

Creating Cartoons to Spark Engagement, Learning

http://www.toondoo.com/

my note:
Avoid using infographics for purposes, which toodoo can serve.
Infographics are for about visualization of stats, not just visualization.
#FindTheRightTool
By Vicki E. Phillips
As instructors, we are constantly looking for new ways to capture our students’ attention and increase their participation in our classes, especially in the online modalities. We spend countless hours crafting weekly announcements for classes and then inevitably receive multiple emails from our students asking the very same questions that we so carefully and completely answered in those very same announcements! The question remains, how do we get them to read our posts?
It was precisely that problem I was trying to solve when I came across several articles touting the benefits of comics in higher education classrooms. I knew I couldn’t create an entire comic book, but I wondered if I could create a content-related cartoon that would not only capture students’ attention and maybe make them laugh, but also interest them enough that they would read the entire announcement or post. In doing so, I would be freed from responding to dozens of emails asking the same questions outlined in the announcements and students could focus on the homework.
A quick Internet search led me to a plethora of free “click and drag” cartoon making software applications to try. I started posting my own cartoons on characters, themes, etc. on the weekly literature we were studying in my upper division American and Contemporary World Literature classes, as well as to offer reminders or a few words of encouragement. Here’s an example of one I posted during week 7 of the semester when students can become discouraged with their assignment load: http://www.toondoo.com/cartoon/10115361
After a positive response, I decided to provide my online students the opportunity to try their hand at cartoon creation. I created a rubric and a set of instructions for an easy to use, free program that I had used, and I opened up the “cartoon challenge” to the students. The results were nothing short of amazing—what intrigued me the most was the time and effort they took with their cartoons. Not only did they create cartoons on the story we were reading, but they also wrote additional posts explaining their ideas for the creation, discussing why they chose a particular scene, and identifying those elements pertinent to the points they were making. These posts tended to receive many more substantial comments from their peers than the traditional discussion board posts, indicating they were being read more.
When students in my face-to-face course heard about the cartoons, they asked to try this approach as well. Their cartoons, shared in class via the overhead projector, led to some of the most engaging and interesting discussions I have ever had in the residential literature classes as students explained how they came up with the elements they chose, and why they picked a certain scene from the reading. The positive student feedback has been instrumental in my continuing to offer this option in both my online and face-to-face classes.
How does one get started in making these cartoons? The good news is you do not have to be an artist to make a cartoon! There are free programs with templates, clip art, and all the elements you would need to click and drag into place all those wonderful ideas you have simmering in your brain. My favorite to use is ToonDoo, available at http://toondoo.com. I like it because there are literally hundreds of elements, a search bar, and it lets me customize what I want to say in the dialog bubbles. It is very user friendly, even for those of us with limited artistic ability.
The whole experience has been overwhelmingly positive for me, and judging from the feedback received, for the students as well. It has also reminded me of one of my teaching goals, which is to incorporate more activities which would fall under assimilating and creating aspects of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, 2001). If that is your goal as well, then try inserting a cartoon in those weekly announcements and ask for feedback from your students—I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!
References:
Armstrong, Patricia (n.d.) Bloom’s Taxonomy, Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/#2001
Pappas, Christopher (2014) The 5 Best Free Cartoon Making Programs for Teachers. Retrieved from: https://elearningindustry.com/the-5-best-free-cartoon-making-tools-for-teachers
Vicki E. Phillips is an assistant professor of English and Literature at Rasmussen College, Ocala, Fla.

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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=presentations

more on create infographics in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/09/infographics-how-to-create-them/

blended and online learning

How much Online Content in Blended Learning?

http://www.hotlunchtray.com/much-online-content-blended-learning/

In 2007 The Sloan Consortium ( presently the Online Learning Consortium) asserted that when 30-79% of class content is available online that is a blended learning class.

"content

entire report here: http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/blending-in.pdf

Choice within Online Content

Another often referenced definer of Blended Learning is The Christensen Institute.  Student control of Time, Place, and Path are important in this definition.

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more on blended learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blended+learning

more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online

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