Archive of ‘e-learning’ category

IM 690 Intro to AR merge cube

IM 690 Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

A little bit of humor, before we start: Actual Reality Goggles:

View this post on Instagram

A new competitor to #vr #virtualreality in @edtech 🤦🏽‍♂️ @scsuvizlab

A post shared by Digital literacy at SCSU (@scsutechinstruct) on

Merge Cube: Intro to AR (Augmented Reality)

    1. What is Merge Cube
    2. Why do we need to know it

The Mobile Future of Augmented Reality from Qualcomm Wireless Evolution
  1. How does it work

View this post on Instagram

#mergecube instruction session w Mark Gill and Alan Srock : Tue, Oct. 22, 11 AM, Miller Center 205. @stcloudstate more info at https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/IMS/2019/10/15/merge-cube-workshop-at-SCSU. @scsualumni @scsu_involvement @scsuambassadors @scsuatwood @scsustudentgovernment @scsu_soe @scsusota @scsucose @scsu_honors @scsusopa @scsu_greek_life

A post shared by Digital literacy at SCSU (@scsutechinstruct) on

6 min video explaining how to start the cube

Mark Gill merge cube workshop of October 22, 2019:
https://minnstate.zoom.us/rec/share/_-FwEpGh_ElJR4XBtG3US4M7Ranreaa80yZI__sMnk-vRzQElwtvUlSuWY7tTT22

Creating Merge Cube objects, Mark Gill video tutorial (password in your D2L course

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2019/10/17/mark-gill-how-to-mergecube/

More information on Merge Cube and comparison with other AR devices:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2019/08/08/sources-to-intro-vr/

+++++++++++++++++++++++

  1. AR with a telephone

Mark Gill explains creation of AR objects to students in an Unity workshop

#AR #AugmentedReality SCSU VizLab St. Cloud State University

Posted by InforMedia Services on Saturday, February 23, 2019

SCSU AR Library Tour:

  1. Microsoft Hololens
    SCSU SOE graduate students’ experience with Hololens:



Seeing it through Hololens:

  1. Microsoft Hololens 2

@microsoft_hololens_ #hololens2 is here. How do you #teched #edtech it for #learning and #teaching?

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, February 27, 2019

How to setup a Hololens

Advanced Hololens with Unity:

++++++++++++++++++++++
More resources (advanced):

  1. Introduction to AR with Unity3D from Andreas Blick

I
+++++++++++
Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
schedule a meeting: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy
find my office: https://youtu.be/QAng6b_FJqs

TopHat and textbook publishers

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-02-04-top-hat-raises-55-million-to-take-on-big-textbook-publishers

Mike Silagadze isn’t shy about his desire to take market share from the largest college textbook publishers through his classroom software company Top Hat. He believes his company’s brand of digital textbooks beats anything Pearson, McGraw-Hill and their ilk can provide.

Founded in 2009, Top Hat claims that 2.7 million students access its digital course materials, including those at 750 of the top 1,000 higher education institutions in North America.

Silagadze believes younger faculty members and future generations of college students will help drive institutions to adopt digital materials instead of print.

Top Hat has challenged tangible goods for a long time now. Its first offering was a digital version of clickers to measure student responses in the classroom. In 2017, the company launched a marketplace for e-textbooks, working with authors and offering openly licensed content from the likes of OpenStax as well.

Last year, the company ceased sales of individual assessment tools to instead offer a bundle of its products. Students pay $48 for one year of Top Hat’s products. Interactive textbooks on Top Hat cost an average of $35.

++++++++++
more on Top Hat in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=tophat

the state of online learning


https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-06-12-the-number-of-students-taking-in-online-courses-is-quickly-rising-but-perceptions-are-changing-slowly

The Babson Survey Research Group, an organization that tracks online enrollment, notes that between 2012 and 2016 the percent of online enrollment in universities increased 17.2 percent while overall enrollment decreased. But that expansion doesn’t necessarily correlate with how the public perceives the quality of online courses, historically questioned for its lack of rigor and limited measurable learning gains.

A Gallup poll conducted back in 2015, found that 46 percent of Americans “strongly agree” or “agree” that online colleges and universities offer a high-quality education—up 30 percent from when the poll was conducted in 2011.

However, researchers caveat these findings, noting that these perception changes happen within particular pockets and are sometimes the result of strategic practices, such as universities not listing the medium of learning on student transcripts.

The last academic leader perception survey released by the Babson Research Group was in 2016.

“We’ve had more and more of the group in the middle that said, ‘I’m not sure’ move into a pro online learning stance,” says Seaman, speaking of the academic leaders he surveyed in the past. “The negative group [those who viewed online learning negatively] had not wavered at all. The positive group did not waiver at all, but we had a steady migration flow of academic leaders in the middle.”

Lowenthal has also researched student perceptions of online learning in the past, finding that learners tend to give such courses more negative evaluations than in-person courses. He says that the findings may represent the lack of experience some educators have teaching in online classrooms. He expects that to change over time, noting that good teachers in person will eventually become good teachers online.

++++++++++++
more on online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

Intrinsic Motivation Digital Distractions

How Intrinsic Motivation Helps Students Manage Digital Distractions

By Ana Homayoun     Oct 8, 2019

According to the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of teenagers check their phones as soon as they get up (and so do 58 percent of their parents), and 45 percent of teenagers feel as though they are online on a nearly constant basis. Interestingly, and importantly, over half of U.S. teenagers feel as though they spend too much time on their cell phones.

Research on intrinsic motivation focuses on the importance of autonomy, competency and relatedness in classroom and school culture.

According to one Common Sense Media report, called Social Media, Social Life, 57 percent of students believe social media use often distracts them when they should be doing homework. In some ways, the first wave of digital citizenship education faltered by blocking distractions from school networks and telling students what to do, rather than effectively encouraging them to develop their own intrinsic motivation around making better choices online and in real life.

Research also suggests that setting high expectations and standards for students can act as a catalyst for improving student motivation, and that a sense of belonging and connectedness in school leads to improved academic self-efficacy and more positive learning experiences.

Educators and teachers who step back and come from a place of curiosity, compassion and empathy (rather than fear, anger and frustration) are better poised to deal with issues related to technology and wellness.

 

+++++++++
more on intrinsic motivation in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=intrinsic

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

online ed enrollment

Digital Learning Compass: The Distance Education Enrollment Report 2017

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/digital-learning-compass-distance-education-enrollment-report-2017

In higher education, 29.7% of all students are taking at least one distance course.
The total distance enrollments are composed of 14.3% of students (2,902,756)
taking exclusively distance courses and 15.4% (3,119,349) who are taking a
combination of distance and non-distance courses. The vast majority (4,999,112,
or 83.0%) of distance students are studying at the undergraduate level.

Almost half of the distance education students are concentrated in just five percent of the institutions, while the top 47 institutions, only 1.0% of the total, enroll 23.0% (1,385,307) of all distance students.

The total number of students studying on campus (those not taking any distance course or taking a combination of distance and non-distance courses) dropped by almost one million (931,317) between 2012 and 2015. The largest declines came at for-profit institutions, which saw a 31.4% drop, followed by 2-year public institutions, which saw a 10.4% decrease.

++++++++++++

2019 Online Education Trends Report

https://www.bestcolleges.com/perspectives/annual-trends-in-online-education/

69% of online students identified employment as their primary goal for entering a program. 17% are grad students.
Seventy percent of administrators said they launch new programs with enrollment growth in mind, while meeting marketing and recruitment goals was their top concern.

++++++++++++

2018 Student Guide to Online Education

https://www.bestcolleges.com/perspectives/annual-student-guide-to-online-education/

++++++++++++++++

2017 Online Education Trends Report

2017 Online Education Trends Report

++++++++++++++++++
Inside Higher Ed’s Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/survey/survey-faculty-attitudes-technology

++++++++++
more on distance education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=distance+education

digitally native need computer help

The Smartphone Generation Needs Computer Help

Young people may be expert social-media and smartphone users, but many lack the digital skills they need for today’s jobs. How can we set them up for success?

https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/grow-google-2019/smartphone-generation-computer-help/3127/

Kenneth Cole’s classroom at the Boys & Girls Club of Dane County, located on a quiet residential street in Madison, Wisconsin.

The classes Cole teaches use Grow with Google’s Applied Digital Skills online curriculum.

One day he may lead Club members in a lesson on building digital resumes that can be customized quickly and make job-seeking easier when applying online. Another day they may create a blog. On this particular day, they drew up a budget for an upcoming event using a spreadsheet. For kids who are often glued to their smartphones, these types of digital tasks, surprisingly, can be new experiences.

The vast majority of young Americans have access to a smartphone, and nearly half say they are online “almost constantly.”

But although smartphones can be powerful learning tools when applied productively, these reports of hyperconnectivity and technological proficiency mask a deeper paucity of digital skills. This often-overlooked phenomenon is limiting some young people’s ability—particularly those in rural and low-income communities—to succeed in school and the workplace, where digital skills are increasingly required to collaborate effectively and complete everyday tasks.

According to a survey by Pew Research Center, only 17 percent of Americans are “digitally ready”—that is, confident using digital tools for learning. Meanwhile, in a separate study, American millennials ranked last among a group of their international peers when it came to “problem-solving in technology-rich environments,” such as sending and saving digital information

teach his sophomore pupils the technology skills they need in the workplace, as well as soft skills like teamwork.

+++++++++++++++++++++
more on digitally native in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitally+native
more on millennials in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=millennials

1 2 3 34