Archive of ‘educational technology’ category

deepfake Putin

Deepfake Putin is here to warn Americans about their self-inflicted doom. AI-generated synthetic media is being used in a political ad campaign—not to disrupt the election, but to save it. from r/technology

https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/09/29/1009098/ai-deepfake-putin-kim-jong-un-us-election/

They then worked with a deepfake artist who used an open-source algorithm to swap in Putin’s and Kim’s faces. A post-production crew cleaned up the leftover artifacts of the algorithm to make the video look more realistic. All in all the process took only 10 days. Attempting the equivalent with CGI likely would have taken months, the team says. It also could have been prohibitively expensive.

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more on deepfake in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=deepfake

digital twin

https://medium.com/@segkrg/the-advantages-of-a-digital-twin-virtual-reality-campus-563b77c951cc

Consider these 10things that happen on a digital twin virtual reality campus that cannot happen in a real-world, physical campus:

  1. Expand a human organ and step inside it. (Here similar video with Mark Gill in the SCSU CAVE: https://youtu.be/EGbToEeoDlA?t=74)
  2. Step into a Star Trek-style transporter and beam up to a starship to learn astronomy on a space walk.
  3. Expand the dissectible pig to the size of a school bus and space-walk through the organs and cavities as you learn about anatomy.
  4. View a wooly mammoth skeleton and then step onto a time machine and go back in time 40,000 years to walk among a herd of wooly mammoths.
  5. Travel to the Great Wall of China, stand upon it and learn the history and engineering of this structure — all in the space of one class period.
  6. Select from the world’s greatest paintings and organize an exhibit in a museum — and let every student do this in their own way.
  7. Watch a video about dinosaurs and then watch as the dinosaurs walk out of the screen and into the middle of the classroom.
  8. Learn Spanish language and culture at the Pyramid of the Moon, rather than a four-walled classroom.
  9. Learn molecular biology by expanding molecules to the size of a basketball.
  10. Gain a greater understanding of history by stepping back in time to the Roman Colosseum and touring it as a class just as it stood 2500 years ago.

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more on digital worlds in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+worlds

The Great Hack Cambridge Analytica

The Great Hack (2019) – Exploring how a data company named Cambridge Analytica came to symbolise the dark side of social media in the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as uncovered by journalist Carole Cadwalladr. [01:54:00] from r/Documentaries

https://www.netflix.com/title/80117542

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Former Cambridge Analytica chief receives seven-year directorship ban from r/worldnews

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/sep/24/cambridge-analytica-directorship-ban-alexander-nix

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more on Cambridge Analytica in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cambridge

Brian Beatty and HyFlex

On June 25, Brian Beatty was a guest to Bryan Alexander’s “Future Forum.”
He will be a guest again this coming Thursday, September 24, 2020, 1PM Central.
Here is the recording from the June 25th session:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2020/06/25/hyflex-model/

On June 25, it was agreed Brian will bring updates and new developments, considering the pandemic impact on that mode of teaching.

To RSVP ahead of time, or to jump straight in, just click these links:
https://shindig.com/login/event/hyflex2

ethics and arts against digital apocalypse

To stop a tech apocalypse we need ethics and the arts from r/philosophy

https://theconversation.com/to-stop-a-tech-apocalypse-we-need-ethics-and-the-arts-128235

Last year, Australia’s Chief Scientist Alan Finkel suggested that we in Australia should become “human custodians”. This would mean being leaders in technological development, ethics, and human rights.

A recent report from the Australian Council of Learned Academies (ACOLA) brought together experts from scientific and technical fields as well as the humanities, arts and social sciences to examine key issues arising from artificial intelligence.

A similar vision drives Stanford University’s Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. The institute brings together researchers from the humanities, education, law, medicine, business and STEM to study and develop “human-centred” AI technologies.

Meanwhile, across the Atlantic, the Future of Humanity Institute at the University of Oxford similarly investigates “big-picture questions” to ensure “a long and flourishing future for humanity”.

The IT sector is also wrestling with the ethical issues raised by rapid technological advancement. Microsoft’s Brad Smith and Harry Shum wrote in their 2018 book The Future Computed that one of their “most important conclusions” was that the humanities and social sciences have a crucial role to play in confronting the challenges raised by AI

Without training in ethics, human rights and social justice, the people who develop the technologies that will shape our future could make poor decisions.

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more on ethics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ethics

student-centered learning

Report: Most educators aren’t equipped for student-centered learning

https://www.educationdive.com/news/report-most-educators-arent-equipped-for-student-centered-learning/585012/

“the perfect combination of catalysts for a rapid conversion to student-centered schooling,” according to a new report from the Christensen Institute.

most K-12 educators aren’t equipped with the skill sets needed to run student-centered schools. For student-centered learning to be adopted, educators must be trained for student-centered competencies,

the report suggests school and district leaders:

  • Work toward a more modular professional development system, which includes specific, verifiable and predictable microcredentials.
  • Specify competencies needed for student-centered educators.
  • Compensate educators with bonuses for microcredentials to incentivize earning them.
  • Purchase bulk licenses to allow teachers the opportunity to earn microcredentials.
  • Demand and pay for mastery of skills rather than a one-time workshop.
  • Vet microcredential issuers’ verification processes, like rubrics and evaluation systems.

While testing could help with personalized instruction, a report from the Center on Reinventing Public Education stressed the need for professional development so teachers can interpret the resulting data and let it guide instruction this year.micr

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more on microcredentials in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=microcredential

ed tech companies

Investment continues to flow to ed tech, with $803 million injected during the first six months of the year, according to the industry news website EdSurge. But half of that went to just six companies, including the celebrity tutorial provider MasterClass, the online learning platform Udemy and the school and college review site Niche.

From the outside, the ed-tech sector may appear as if “there’s a bonanza and it’s like the dot-com boom again and everybody’s printing money,” said Michael Hansen, CEO of the K-12 and higher education digital learning provider Cengage. “That is not the case.”

Even if they want to buy more ed-tech tools, meanwhile, schools and colleges are short on cash. Expenses for measures to deal with Covid-19 are up, while budgets are expected to be down.

Analysts and industry insiders now expect a wave of acquisitions as already-dominant brands like these seek to corner even more of the market by snatching up smaller players that provide services they don’t.

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Tech-based contact tracing could put schools in murky privacy territory

https://www.educationdive.com/news/tech-based-contact-tracing-could-put-schools-in-murky-privacy-territory/584881/

  • A white paper from the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project (STOP) suggests the use of contact tracing technology by schools could erode student privacy and may not be effective in preventing the spread of coronavirus.

Despite the pandemic, schools still must conform to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and other laws governing student privacy. Districts can disclose information to public health officials, for example, but information can’t be released to the general public without written consent from parents.

The Safely Reopen Schools mobile app is one tool available for automating contact tracing. The idea is that if two mobile phones are close enough to connect via Bluetooth, the phone owners are close enough to transmit the virus. The app includes daily health check-ins and educational notifications, but no personal information is exchanged between the phones, and the app won’t disclose who tested positive.

Colleges are also using apps to help trace and track students’ exposure to coronavirus. In August, 20,000 participants from the University of Alabama at Birmingham were asked to test the GuideSafe mobile app, which will alert them if they’ve been in contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19. The app determines the proximity of two people through cell phone signal strength. If someone reports they contracted the virus, an alert will be sent to anyone who has been within six feet of them for at least 15 minutes over the previous two weeks.

Critics of the technology claim these apps aren’t actually capable of contract tracing and could undermine manual efforts to do so.

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more on ed tech in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=educational+technology

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