Archive of ‘educational technology’ category

Huawei funded by Chinese Military

CIA Offers Proof Huawei Has Been Funded By China’s Military And Intelligence

Zak Doffman Cybersecurity

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zakdoffman/2019/04/20/cia-offers-proof-huawei-has-been-funded-by-chinas-military-and-intelligence/#4043c72b7208

the Times reported that such evidence exists, it has just not been openly published.

Joy Tan, Huawei’s chief global communicator, told methat “the assumption that the Chinese government can potentially interfere in Huawei’s business operation is completely not true. Huawei is a private company. The Chinese government does not have any ownership or any interference in our business operations.”

The CIA has now directly refuted this.

Tan insisted that “China does not have any law to force any company or business to install a back door. Premier Li Keqiang said that openly several weeks ago, the Chinese government would never do that, make any company spy.”

According to the Times source, “only the most senior U.K. officials are believed to have seen the intelligence, which the CIA awarded a strong but not cast-iron classification of certainty.” But the newspaper also reports a separate U.S. course as saying that there is a view within the U.S. intelligence community that “the Chinese ministry of state security — its principal security and espionage organization — had approved government funding for Huawei.”

change in the K12 sector

Twelve Years Later: What’s Really Changed in the K-12 Sector? (Part 1)

By Dave Stevenson     Apr 3, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-04-03-twelve-years-later-what-s-really-changed-in-the-k-12-sector-part-1

In fall 2007, Larry Berger, CEO of Wireless Generation (now Amplify) was invited to submit a paper to an “Entrepreneurship in Education”

As education entrepreneurs know, growth in K-12 comes hard. Sometimes very hard. We were living Marc Andreessen’s startup mantra: “You only ever experience two emotions: euphoria and terror.”

The edtech boom of the past two decades promised efficacy and new instructional models. Many teachers instead experience it as “clutter.” But poorly integrated standards, curriculum, assessment, and intervention materials have always been a problem.

When it comes to instruction, the work consists of four segments: core curriculum, supplemental (intervention, test prep, little books) curriculum, assessment, and technology (hardware, infrastructure and connectivity). Each of these workstreams are run by separate teams, using independent funding streams, only rarely coordinating. Schools rely—as they always have—on the hero in the classroom, who has to somehow synthesize everything for a roomful of children, every single day.

Bug-in-Ear Coaching

With Bug-in-Ear Coaching, Teachers Get Feedback on the Fly

By February 26, 2019

https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2019/02/27/with-bug-in-ear-coaching-teachers-get-feedback-on.html/

The practice is called bug-in-ear coaching, and it has been around for decades in different sectors in some capacity. But in recent years, more and more educators are beginning to try it out.

And a growing body of research shows it works. When educators are coached with this technology, they use evidence-based practices in their instruction more frequently. Research also shows that most teachers tend to keep up the improvements in their teaching behavior after the bug-in-ear coaching sessions have ended.

Yet experts say there’s skepticism from some in the education community, who worry that real-time feedback while teachers are delivering instruction will be overwhelming.

Virtual teacher-coaching services have become more popular in recent years—teachers record their lessons, and remote coaches review the videos and offer feedback. This approach has been especially popular in rural schools, or in districts that can’t afford to staff their own coaches.

As educators see the benefits of the coaching method, experts predict that it will continue to spread. That has been the case at the University of Washington’s college of education, where researchers have done a series of studies with bug-in-ear coaching.

 

Bryan Alexander EdTech class

a tech catalog for students to explore and choose from, partially based on Georgetown’s enterprise suite, including a learning management system (Canvas), blogging (WordPress or other), student-run web domains, web annotation (Hypothesis) https://web.hypothes.is/, collaborative writing (Google Suite), discussion boards (Discourse), and videoconferencing (Zoom).

Neil Selwyn’s excellent Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates.

OLC Collaborate

OLC Collaborate

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/attend-2019/innovate/

schedule:

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/attend-2019/innovate/program/all_sessions/#streamed

Wednesday

++++++++++++++++
THE NEW PROFESSOR: HOW I PODCASTED MY WAY INTO STUDENTS’ LIVES (AND HOW YOU CAN, TOO)

Concurrent Session 1

https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/olc-innovate-2019-session-page/?session=6734&kwds=

+++++++++++++

Creating A Cost-Free Course

+++++++++++++++++

Idea Hose: AI Design For People
Date: Wednesday, April 3rd
Time: 3:30 PM to 4:15 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 3
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Brian Kane (General Design LLC)
Track: Research: Designs, Methods, and Findings
Location: Juniper A
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:What happens when you apply design thinking to AI? AI presents a fundamental change in the way people interact with machines. By applying design thinking to the way AI is made and used, we can generate an unlimited amount of new ideas for products and experiences that people will love and use.https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/olc-innovate-2019-session-page/?session=6964&kwds=
Notes from the session:
design thinking: get out from old mental models.  new narratives; get out of the sci fi movies.
narrative generators: AI design for people stream
we need machines to make mistakes. Ai even more then traditional software.
Lessons learned: don’t replace people
creativity engines – automated creativity.
trends:
 AI Design for People stream49 PM-us9swehttps://www.androidauthority.com/nvidia-jetson-nano-966609/
https://community.infiniteflight.com/t/virtualhub-ios-and-android-free/142837?u=sudafly
 http://bit.ly/VirtualHub
Thursday
Chatbots, Game Theory, And AI: Adapting Learning For Humans, Or Innovating Humans Out Of The Picture?
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 8:45 AM to 9:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 4
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Matt Crosslin (University of Texas at Arlington LINK Research Lab)
Track: Experiential and Life-Long Learning
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:How can teachers utilize chatbots and artificial intelligence in ways that won’t remove humans out of the education picture? Using tools like Twine and Recast.AI chatobts, this session will focus on how to build adaptive content that allows learners to create their own heutagogical educational pathways based on individual needs.++++++++++++++++

This Is Us: Fostering Effective Storytelling Through EdTech & Student’s Influence As Digital Citizens
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 9:45 AM to 10:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 5
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Maikel Alendy (FIU Online)
Co-presenter: Sky V. King (FIU Online – Florida International University)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:“This is Us” demonstrates how leveraging storytelling in learning engages students to effectively communicate their authentic story, transitioning from consumerism to become creators and influencers. Addressing responsibility as a digital citizen, information and digital literacy, online privacy, and strategies with examples using several edtech tools, will be reviewed.++++++++++++++++++

Personalized Learning At Scale: Using Adaptive Tools & Digital Assistants
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 6
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Kristin Bushong (Arizona State University )
Co-presenter: Heather Nebrich (Arizona State University)
Track: Effective Tools, Toys and Technologies
Location: Juniper C
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:Considering today’s overstimulated lifestyle, how do we engage busy learners to stay on task? Join this session to discover current efforts in implementing ubiquitous educational opportunities through customized interests and personalized learning aspirations e.g., adaptive math tools, AI support communities, and memory management systems.+++++++++++++

High-Impact Practices Online: Starting The Conversation
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 1:15 PM to 2:00 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 7
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Katie Linder (Oregon State University)
Co-presenter: June Griffin (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 4-5
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:The concept of High-impact Educational Practices (HIPs) is well-known, but the conversation about transitioning HIPs online is new. In this session, contributors from the edited collection High-Impact Practices in Online Education will share current HIP research, and offer ideas for participants to reflect on regarding implementing HIPs into online environments.https://www.aacu.org/leap/hipshttps://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/LEAP/HIP_tables.pdf+++++++++++++++++++++++

Human Skills For Digital Natives: Expanding Our Definition Of Tech And Media Literacy
Date: Thursday, April 4th
Time: 3:45 PM to 5:00 PM
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Manoush Zomorodi (Stable Genius Productions)
Track: N/A
Location: Adams Ballroom
Session Duration: 1hr 15min
Brief Abstract:How can we ensure that students and educators thrive in increasingly digital environments, where change is the only constant? In this keynote, author and journalist Manoush Zomorodi shares her pioneering approach to researching the effects of technology on our behavior. Her unique brand of journalism includes deep-dive investigations into such timely topics as personal privacy, information overload, and the Attention Economy. These interactive multi-media experiments with tens of thousands of podcast listeners will inspire you to think creatively about how we use technology to educate and grow communities.Friday

Anger Is An Energy
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Michael Caulfield (Washington State University-Vancouver)
Track: N/A
Location: Adams Ballroom
Position: 2
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:Years ago, John Lyndon (then Johnny Rotten) sang that “anger is an energy.” And he was right, of course. Anger isn’t an emotion, like happiness or sadness. It’s a reaction, a swelling up of a confused urge. I’m a person profoundly uncomfortable with anger, but yet I’ve found in my professional career that often my most impactful work begins in a place of anger: anger against injustice, inequality, lies, or corruption. And often it is that anger that gives me the energy and endurance to make a difference, to move the mountains that need to be moved. In this talk I want to think through our uneasy relationship with anger; how it can be helpful, and how it can destroy us if we’re not careful.++++++++++++++++

Improving Online Teaching Practice, Creating Community And Sharing Resources
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 10:45 AM to 11:30 AM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 10
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Laurie Daily (Augustana University)
Co-presenter: Sharon Gray (Augustana University)
Track: Problems, Processes, and Practices
Location: Juniper A
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:The purpose of this session is to explore the implementation of a Community of Practice to support professional development, enhance online course and program development efforts, and to foster community and engagement between and among full and part time faculty.+++++++++++++++

It’s Not What You Teach, It’s HOW You Teach: A Story-Driven Approach To Course Design
Date: Friday, April 5th
Time: 11:45 AM to 12:30 PM
Conference Session: Concurrent Session 11
Streamed session
Lead Presenter: Katrina Rainer (Strayer University)
Co-presenter: Jennifer M McVay-Dyche (Strayer University)
Track: Teaching and Learning Practice
Location: Cottonwood 2-3
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:Learning is more effective and organic when we teach through the art of storytelling. At Strayer University, we are blending the principles story-driven learning with research-based instructional design practices to create engaging learning experiences. This session will provide you with strategies to strategically infuse stories into any lesson, course, or curriculum.

measure school tech infrastructure

https://events.edsurge.com/webinars/how-to-get-measurable-value-from-your-schools-tech-infrastructure

School districts are more connected than ever. The latest Infrastructure Survey report from CoSN shows that over 90% of districts have sufficient broadband. So why isn’t everyone using it to generate measurable outcomes?

How technology can be used in the classroom to help support learning and productivity
How school leaders can calculate the value of their tech investments
The importance of video when it comes to keeping students engaged (hint: video is key)
The most important metrics to consider when collecting data on your technology (it’s ok to start small)

Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer

What’s the Role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer?

Research from the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) has been transferred to EDUCAUSE, including a report on the role of the Chief Academic Technology Officer and its differences and similarities to other higher ed IT tech executives.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/1/the-center-for-higher-education-cio-studies-reports-2003-2018 Friday, January 18, 2019

The Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) was a nonprofit organization founded by Dr. Wayne A. Brown, dedicated to the education and development of technology leaders in higher education. CHECS produced the CIO Study, the Technology Leadership (TL) Study, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Study and the Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study.

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) study provides information about higher education CIOs’ attributes, education, experience and effectiveness. The CIO study was conducted from 2003 to 2018. Find all the CIO reports here.

The Technology Leadership (TL) study surveyed those in the next organizational layer down from the CIO.  The TL study examines the demographics of the TL, where they have worked, and the activities they are undertaking to prepare themselves to become CIOs.  The TL study was study was conducted from 2009 to 2018. Find all the TL reports here.

The Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) study examines the demographics of the higher education CISO, the career route they have taken to their role, and the activities and attributes needed for a CISO according to the CISO and the CIO. The CISO study was study was conducted from 2014 to 2017. Find all the CISO reports here.

The Higher Education Chief Academic Technology Officer Study, 2018 canvassed CIOs, known CATOs and academic technology leaders, as well as deans and provosts to understand changes happening across institutions of higher education in academic technology.

1 2 3 78