Archive of ‘gamification’ category

Gamifying Biomedical Education

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-04-17-how-one-university-is-gamifying-medical-educationhttps://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-04-17-how-one-university-is-gamifying-medical-education

instead of Super Mario or Zelda, they’ll be playing a game called CD4 Hunter, which launched last June and focuses on teaching students the first step in the HIV replication cycle. In the game, players roleplay as the virus and are charged with moving throughout the bloodstream to identify receptors, get past immune defenses, and target and infect cells.

Without much of a clue as to how to design or program a game, Urdaneta-Hartmann won a $10,000 grant from Drexel to develop her own skills in educational gaming and create a tool for students in the program.

So far, Urdaneta-Hartmann claims the CD4 Hunter app has nearly 2,900 downloads on the iTunes store today.

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more on gamification of education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

Intrinsic Motivation Digital Distractions

How Intrinsic Motivation Helps Students Manage Digital Distractions

By Ana Homayoun     Oct 8, 2019

According to the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of teenagers check their phones as soon as they get up (and so do 58 percent of their parents), and 45 percent of teenagers feel as though they are online on a nearly constant basis. Interestingly, and importantly, over half of U.S. teenagers feel as though they spend too much time on their cell phones.

Research on intrinsic motivation focuses on the importance of autonomy, competency and relatedness in classroom and school culture.

According to one Common Sense Media report, called Social Media, Social Life, 57 percent of students believe social media use often distracts them when they should be doing homework. In some ways, the first wave of digital citizenship education faltered by blocking distractions from school networks and telling students what to do, rather than effectively encouraging them to develop their own intrinsic motivation around making better choices online and in real life.

Research also suggests that setting high expectations and standards for students can act as a catalyst for improving student motivation, and that a sense of belonging and connectedness in school leads to improved academic self-efficacy and more positive learning experiences.

Educators and teachers who step back and come from a place of curiosity, compassion and empathy (rather than fear, anger and frustration) are better poised to deal with issues related to technology and wellness.

 

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more on intrinsic motivation in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=intrinsic

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

jigsaw classroom

https://www.jigsaw.org/

The jigsaw classroom is a research-based cooperative learning technique invented and developed in the early 1970s by Elliot Aronson and his students at the University of Texas and the University of California. Since 1971, thousands of classrooms have used jigsaw with great success.

STEP ONE

Divide students into 5- or 6-person jigsaw groups.

The groups should be diverse in terms of gender, ethnicity, race, and ability.

STEP TWO

Appoint one student from each group as the leader.

Initially, this person should be the most mature student in the group.

STEP THREE

Divide the day’s lesson into 5-6 segments.

For example, if you want history students to learn about Eleanor Roosevelt, you might divide a short biography of her into stand-alone segments on: (1) Her childhood, (2) Her family life with Franklin and their children, (3) Her life after Franklin contracted polio, (4) Her work in the White House as First Lady, and (5) Her life and work after Franklin’s death.

STEP FOUR

Assign each student to learn one segment.

Make sure students have direct access only to their own segment.

STEP FIVE

Give students time to read over their segment at least twice and become familiar with it.

There is no need for them to memorize it.

STEP SIX

Form temporary “expert groups” by having one student from each jigsaw group join other students assigned to the same segment.

Give students in these expert groups time to discuss the main points of their segment and to rehearse the presentations they will make to their jigsaw group.

STEP SEVEN

Bring the students back into their jigsaw groups.

STEP EIGHT

Ask each student to present her or his segment to the group.

Encourage others in the group to ask questions for clarification.

STEP NINE

Float from group to group, observing the process.

If any group is having trouble (e.g., a member is dominating or disruptive), make an appropriate intervention. Eventually, it’s best for the group leader to handle this task. Leaders can be trained by whispering an instruction on how to intervene, until the leader gets the hang of it.

STEP TEN

At the end of the session, give a quiz on the material.

Students quickly come to realize that these sessions are not just fun and games but really count.

Non-Traditional Badge Development

Managing Relationships with Partners in Non-Traditional Badge Development

Live Webcast: October 28, 2019 | 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Eastern
Webcast Recording: Available 10 business days after the Live Webcast

$450.00

Non-traditional badges represent a growing market full of opportunity. However, you may not be pursuing badges of this type, because you’re not sure how to work with industry partners in development and management. Don’t let that stop you!

Join us for this webcast to learn tips on how to engage with industry partners for non-traditional badge development. We will profile a typical relationship with industry partners and share common pitfalls to avoid.

Michael P. Macklin

Associate Provost for Workforce Partnerships/Development, Colorado Community College System

Michael’s primary focuses are workforce development, noncredit programming, and business partnership development. Through Mr. Macklin’s work with digital badges, he is leveraging the power of digital credential opportunities in advanced manufacturing, healthcare and information technology. He understands that digital badges are key in sustaining and expanding workforce skillsets with community and business partners as this allows for unprecedented access to affordable reskilling and upskilling opportunities. Read Michael’s full bio here.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badge

VR Relax

Join mindfulness sessions in VR, and leave refreshed, renewed, and better connected!

AI and XR and Educational Gaming

AI and Mixed Reality Drive Educational Gaming into ‘Boom Phase’

By Dian Schaffhauser 09/16/19

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2019/09/16/ai-and-mixed-reality-drive-educational-gaming-into-boom-phase.aspx

Artificial intelligence and mixed reality have driven demand in learning games around the world, according to a new report by Metaari. A five-year forecast has predicted that educational gaming will reach $24 billion by 2024, with a compound annual growth rate of 33 percent and a quadrupling of revenues. Metaari is an analyst firm that tracks advanced learning technology.

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