Archive of ‘gamification’ category

ed leadership and edtech

Edtech playground: Helping teachers choose better tools

By Nicole Krueger Leadership

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=2177

A virtual reality headset can take students on an immersive journey to another world. But no matter how cool it is, if that $3,000 piece of equipment enters a classroom and doesn’t provide any real instructional value, it can quickly become a very expensive paperweight.

Most schools don’t do edtech procurement really well yet. Sometimes we buy products that end up in closets because they don’t fit the instructional needs of students, and we end up not being good stewards of taxpayer dollars.

Located in the district’s central office, where hundreds of teachers and staff members stop by each week for professional development, the playground offers a creative space that encourages teachers to explore new tools that have been vetted and approved by the district’s tech department.

In the United States, K-12 schools spend more than $13 billion a year on edtech — often without any idea whether it will make a difference in learning outcomes.

 

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More on ISTE in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=iste

more on digital literacy for ed leaders in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+EDAD

AR and PokemonGo

GOTTACATCHEMALL:EXPLORING POKEMON GO IN SEARCH OF LEARNING ENHANCEMENT OBJECTS
Annamaria Cacchione, Emma Procter-Legg and Sobah Abbas Petersen
Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Filologia, Av.da Complutense sn, 28040 Madrid, Spain Independent; Abingdon, Oxon, UK SINTEF Technology and Society, Trondheim, Norway
https://www.academia.edu/30254871/_GOTTACATCHEMALL_EXPLORING_POKEMON_GO_IN_SEARCH_OF_LEARNING_ENHANCEMENT_OBJECTS
KEYWORDS
Pokemon Go, MALL, Learning, Augmented Reality, Gamification, Situated learning
ABSTRACT
The Augmented Reality Game, Pokemon Go, took the world by storm in the summer of 2016. City landscapes were decorated with amusing, colourful objects called Pokemon, and the holiday activities were enhanced by catching these wonderful creatures. In light of this, it is inevitable for mobile language learning researchers to reflect on the impact oft his game on learning and how it may be leveraged to enhance the design of mobile and ubiquitous technologies for mobile and situated language learning. This paper analyses the game Pokemon Go and the players’ experiences accordingto a framework developed for evaluating mobile language learning and discusses how Pokemon Go can help to meetsome of the challenges faced by earlier research activities.
A comparison between PG and Geocashing will illustrate the evolution of the concept of location-based games a concept that is very close to that of situated learning that we have explored in several previous works. 
Pokémon Go is a free, location-based augmented reality game developed for mobile devices. Players useGPS on their mobile device to locate, capture, battle, and train virtual creatures (a.k.a. Pokémon), whichappear on screen overlaying the image seen through the device’s camera. This makes it seem like thePokemon are in the same real-world location as the player
“Put simply, augmented reality is a technology that overlays computer generated visuals over the real worldthrough a device camera bringing your surroundings to life and interacting with sensors such as location and heart rate to provide additional information” (Ramirez, 2014).
Apply the evaluation framework developed in 2015 for mobile learning applications(Cacchione, Procter-Legg, Petersen, & Winter, 2015). The framework is composed of a set offactors of different nature neuroscientific, technological, organisational and pedagogical and aim to provide a comprehensive account  of what plays a major role in ensuring effective learning via mobile devices

parents wary of VR

Your kids and virtual reality: What parents should know

also in : https://usa-businessnews.com/2018/04/04/your-kids-and-virtual-reality-what-parents-should-know/
A whopping 60 percent of parents are worried about the VR’s health effects, according to a new study from Common Sense Media, while others hope the emerging technology will have profound educational benefits because of its highly-engaging nature.
Jim Steyer, founder of Common Sense Media https://www.commonsense.org/education/
Stanford researchers partnered with Common Sense Media, which has done extensive research on children’s media use, to examine the impact of VR on children. Their report includes a national survey of 12,148 adults, 3,613 of whom were parents.
the study notes that 21 percent of households with children already have a VR device and 13 percent are planning to get one, Common Sense found that many parents are scared of exposing their children to such intense experiences.
Bailenson, founder of Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, acknowledged the long term effects of VR on developing brains remain unknown. But short term impacts can include dizziness, headache and eye strain.  https://vhil.stanford.edu/projects/
My note: more on VR and empathy in this IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+empathy
While 62 percent of parents surveyed believe that VR can provide educational experiences, only 22 percent reported their child actually used VR for learning. The vast majority play games.

VR also has the potential to encourage empathy among small children, experts say, because it builds bonds with virtual characters and settings, though parents surveyed by Common Sense remain skeptical.  

 

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more on VR in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education

storytelling AR and VR tools

Unleash the Power of Storytelling With These New AR and VR Tools

By Jaime Donally (Columnist)     Apr 4, 2018

Teachers can bring VR stories into the classroom in many different ways for meaningful learning experiences. Imagine a scavenger hunt where students narrate a story based on what they find. Or consider using objects they see to identify vocabulary words or recognize letters. Students should have purpose in their viewing and it should directly connect to standards.

Starting with virtual reality, stories in apps such as Google Spotlight Storiesand YouTube 360 videos have been popular from the start.

Similar to the new movie, Ready Player One, they provide an intense experience where the viewer feels like they are in the center of the story.

Using a mobile device or tablet, the student can start the story and look around the scene based on their interest, rather than the cameras focus. New apps such as Baobab VR have continued to appear with more interactions and engagement.

A creative way to have your students create their own virtual stories is using the app Roundme. Upload your 360 image and add directional sound, links and content. Upload portals to walk the viewer into multiple scenes and then easily share the stories by link to the story.

Newer augmented reality apps that work with ARKit have taken another approach to storytelling.  Augmented Stories and My Hungry Caterpillar.Qurious, a company that is working on a release blending gaming, making and storytelling in one app.

Storyfab, turns our students into the directors of the show

A new AR book, SpyQuest, has moved the immersive experience a big step forward as it helps define the story by bringing the images to life. Through the camera lens on a device, the stories make students the agents in an adventure into the world of espionage. The augmented reality experiences on the images use the accompanying app to scan the scene and provide further insight into the story.

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more on storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

more on VR and storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+storytelling

 

IM 554 discussion on GBL 2018

Course title: IM 554 Developing Skills for Online Teaching and Learning

Topic for this week: Game-based learning, Virtual Reliability, and Augmented Reality
Audience: IM Graduate students working for K12 schools or in business

7:20 to 8:20 PM, Thursday, March 29.  Instructor: Yun Claire Park

  1. What did we learn from last year: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/im554-discussion-gbl/
    1. definitions and delineation of gaming and gamification
    2. the connection to BYOD
  2. What do we want to learn this year/today?
    1. more on gaming and gamification
    2. more on realities
      1. what is VR – virtual reality

Virtual reality (VR) is “a computer technology that uses virtual reality headsets or multi-
projected environments, sometimes in combination with physical environments or props, to
generate realistic images, sounds and other sensations that simulate a user's physical presence in a virtual or imaginary environment” (“Virtual Reality” n.d.) VR is accomplished by using headsets, such as HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, PlayStation VR, and Samsung Gear VR. The use of the headsets creates (and enhances) digitally constructed “reality,” thus providing excellent opportunities for simulations and learning through training and practice. Among a myriad of other definitions, Noor (2016, 34) describes Virtual Reality (VR) as “a computer-generated environment that can simulate physical presence in places in the real world or imagined worlds. The user wears a headset and through specialized software and sensors is immersed in 360- degree views of simulated worlds.”

from our book chapter: Video 360: The new type of visualization to help patrons enter the era of VR, AR and Mixed Reality (under review).

what is AR – augmented reality

“Augmented Reality (AR) supplements the physical environment with computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics, or other useful information – essentially overlaying the digital information on top of the physical world. Some consider the smartphone popular game “Pokemon Go” a form of consumer AR.”

from my book Chapter 12: VR, AR and Video 360: A Case Study Towards New Realities in Education by Plamen Miltenoff (under review)

what is MR – mixed reality

mixed reality

 

 

 

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Mixed_reality#/media/File:Mixed_Reality_Scale.png

  1. Video 360
    1. how to create non-expensive VR = Video 360 degrees

A two-dimensional flat frame

 

 

 

A two-dimensional flat frame

Consumer types of cameras

Consumer types of cameras

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More information on GBL in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=%22game-based+learning%22

more on VR in education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education

more on AE in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=augmented+reality

T4TL games and VR

Recording of today’s session:

https://minnstate.adobeconnect.com/p0igkjuoc24c

Matt Julius, Mark Gill, Bill Gorsica present games and VR for education

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

more on games in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming

Library Technology Conference 2018

Plamen Miltenoff and Mark Gill presentation: http://sched.co/E8l3

#LTC2018 #VRlib – join us for a discussion

Library Technology Conference 2018 from Plamen Miltenoff
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http://libtechconf.org/schedule/

 Keynote Speaker: Sarah T. Roberts

Commercial Content Moderation:

social media – call centers in Iowa, where agriculture is expected. not an awesome job. http://sched.co/D7pQ
Caleris as featured in New York Times.
Sarah Roberts talk about psychological effects of working at Caleris; it resembles the effect of air strikes on the drone pilots
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/23/us/drone-pilots-found-to-get-stress-disorders-much-as-those-in-combat-do.html
Flipping and Assessing Information Literacy
Mary Beth Sancomb-Moran
Librarian, University of Minnesota Rochester
DOI purpose for students’ research
http://ilaap.ca/ to asses the lib instruction
https://www.qualtrics.com/
4 videos 3 min each
Building Online Exhibits with the Islandora Digital Asset Management Solution

Alex Kent

Drupal based. Google Analytics like. Bookmarks. objects list can be shared through social media, email, etc. Pachyderm used to have timeline like Islandora. still images, audio, video

Library as Publisher: OpenSUNY Textbooks

Leah Root

http://sched.co/D7iS

Publishing/Web Services Developer, Milne Library, State University of New York at Geneseo
http://navigator.suny.edu/content/about
https://textbooks.opensuny.org/suny-oer-services-request/
executive board and advisory staff
jQuery
digital humanities
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Notes from LIBTECH 2017: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/07/library-technology-conference-2017/

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