Archive of ‘gaming’ category

Minecraft Education edition

Minecraft: Education Edition 1.0.1 Released with Code Builder Support

By David Nagel 05/22/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/05/22/minecraft-education-edition-1.0.1-released-with-code-builder-support.aspx

Microsoft has released a new version of Minecraft: Education Edition that adds support for Code Builder

Code Builder is an extension for Minecraft that lets users perform typical Minecraft functions through code. It connects to ScratchX, Tynker and Microsoft’s new open source development tool, MakeCode.

Minecraft’s changelog page.

Teacher training materials for Code Builder for Minecraft: Education Edition can be found at education.minecraft.net/trainings/code-builder-for-minecraft-education-edition.

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more on Minecraft in Education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=+minecraft

Serious Play Conference 2017

Serious Play Conference

2017 Conference Program

Ben Ward, Kansas State University
Joelle Pitts, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor, Kansas State University Libraries
Stefan Yates, Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor, Kansas State University

Transmedia, unicorns, and marketing, oh my!: The not-quite epic failure of transmedia design efforts in Oz.

Transmedia storytelling, also called Alternate Reality Games, have been designed to intrigue, engage, and even engineer groups of people since the release of The Beast in 2001. A few colleges and Universities have employed them to engage their student populations and even teach them a thing or two using narrative game mechanics. Presenters will chronicle a highly successful transmedia design effort at Kansas State University, and the subsequent annual efforts to replicate the engagement and enthusiasm. Best practices and not-quite epic failures will be discussed, as will tips (and laments) for marketing to our current student populations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmedia_storytelling

http://www.tstoryteller.com/transmedia-storytelling

http://henryjenkins.org/2007/03/transmedia_storytelling_101.html

http://athinklab.com/transmedia-storytelling/what-is-transmedia-storytelling/

Transmedia Storytelling: The Complete Guide

What is Transmedia Storytelling?

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/401760/transmedia-storytelling/

http://nerdist.com/a-look-at-transmedia-storytelling/

Glenn Larsen, National Science Foundation
SBIR and Other Funding Sources for Your Game

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awards nearly $190 million annually to startups and small businesses through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, transforming scientific discovery into products and services with commercial and societal impact. The equity-free funds support research and development (R&D) across almost all areas of science and technology helping companies de-risk technology for commercial success. The NSF is an independent federal agency with a budget of about $7 billion that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering. For more information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/SBIR.

Karen Schrier, Assistant Professor/Director of Games and Emerging Media, Marist College
Design Principles for Knowledge Games

Lisa Castaneda, CEO, foundry10|
Mark Suter, Teacher, Bernards Township Schools

How Teachers Can Use VR in the Classroom: Beyond the Novelty

Over the past three years, foundry10, an education research organization, has been studying the potential of Virtual Reality in Education. The research has focused on the implementation, immersion dynamics, and integration of content across the curriculum.

Working with a variety of classroom curricular areas, with students and teachers from 30 schools, we have gathered data as well as anecdotal stories to help illustrate how VR functions in a learning environment. Students from all over the US, Canada and parts of Europe, completed pre/post surveys and educators participated in extensive qualitative interviews in order to better understand what it means to learn with virtual reality.

Please join foundry10 CEO Lisa Castaneda and teachers Steve Isaacs and Mark Suter as we share what we have learned about how to effectively utilize VR for classroom learning through content creation (both inside and outside of the virtual world), content consumption and content integration and overcoming the obstacles inherent in implementation.

Lisa Castaneda, Steven Isaacs & Mark Suter – Virtual Reality in Education: Exploring the New Frontier from SeriousGamesAssoc

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more on gaming in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming

immersive VR

Immersive Tech Brings VR to Live Events

By Sri Ravipati 04/18/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/18/immersive-tech-brings-vr-to-live-events.aspx

Voke VR, a virtual reality (VR) company founded by two former Washington State University (WSU) professors, is working to build Intel-backed immersive tech for live events.

At the core of the platform is Voke’s TrueVR product, which delivers full stereoscopic 3D video that is integrated with augmented content in a 360-degree VR environment. It uses multiple camera angles with zoom capabilities and synchronized DVR, so that viewers can control what they want to watch. Additionally, with TrueVR, content is captured, encoded, synced with scores, metadata and audio and delivered in real time to multiple platforms.

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

digital learning

The Disruption of Digital Learning: Ten Things We Have Learned

Published on Featured in: Leadership & Management    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/disruption-digital-learning-ten-things-we-have-learned-josh-bersin

meetings with Chief Learning Officers, talent management leaders, and vendors of next generation learning tools.

The corporate L&D industry is over $140 billion in size, and it crosses over into the $300 billion marketplace for college degrees, professional development, and secondary education around the world.

Digital Learning does not mean learning on your phone, it means “bringing learning to where employees are.” In other words, this new era is not only a shift in tools, it’s a shift toward employee-centric design. Shifting from “instructional design” to “experience design” and using design thinking are key here.

evolution of L&D The Evolution of Corporate Training

1) The traditional LMS is no longer the center of corporate learning, and it’s starting to go away.

LMS platforms were designed around the traditional content model, using a 17 year old standard called SCORM. SCORM is a technology developed in the 1980s, originally intended to help companies like track training records from their CD-ROM based training programs.

the paradigm that we built was focused on the idea of a “course catalog,” an artifact that makes sense for formal education, but no longer feels relevant for much of our learning today.

not saying the $4 billion LMS market is dead, but the center or action has moved (ie. their cheese has been moved). Today’s LMS is much more of a compliance management system, serving as a platform for record-keeping, and this function can now be replaced by new technologies.

We have come from a world of CD ROMs to online courseware (early 2000s) to an explosion of video and instructional content (YouTube and MOOCs in the last five years), to a new world of always-on, machine-curated content of all shapes and sizes. The LMS, which was largely architected in the early 2000s, simply has not kept up effectively.

2) The emergence of the X-API makes everything we do part of learning.

In the days of SCORM (the technology developed by Boeing in the 1980s to track CD Roms) we could only really track what you did in a traditional or e-learning course. Today all these other activities are trackable using the X-API (also called Tin Can or the Experience API). So just like Google and Facebook can track your activities on websites and your browser can track your clicks on your PC or phone, the X-API lets products like the learning record store keep track of all your digital activities at work.

Evolution of Learning Technology Standards

3) As content grows in volume, it is falling into two categories: micro-learning and macro-learning.

MicroLearning vs. MacroLearning
Understanding Macro vs. Micro Learning

4) Work Has Changed, Driving The Need for Continuous Learning

Why is all the micro learning content so important? Quite simply because the way we work has radically changed. We spend an inordinate amount of time looking for information at work, and we are constantly bombarded by distractions, messages, and emails.

The Overwhelmed Employee
Too Much Time Searching

sEmployees spend 1% of their time learning

5) Spaced Learning Has Arrived

If we consider the new world of content (micro and macro), how do we build an architecture that teaches people what to use when? Can we make it easier and avoid all this searching?

“spaced learning.”

Neurological research has proved that we don’t learn well through “binge education” like a course. We learn by being exposed to new skills and ideas over time, with spacing and questioning in between. Studies have shown that students who cram for final exams lose much of their memory within a few weeks, yet students who learn slowly with continuous reinforcement can capture skills and knowledge for decades.

Ebbinghaus forgetting curve

Spaced Learning: Repetition, Spacing, Questioning

6) A New Learning Architecture Has Emerged: With New Vendors To Consider

One of the keys to digital learning is building a new learning architecture. This means using the LMS as a “player” but not the “center,” and looking at a range of new tools and systems to bring content together.
The New Learning Landscape

On the upper left is a relatively new breed of vendors, including companies like Degreed, EdCast, Pathgather, Jam, Fuse, and others, that serve as “learning experience” platforms. They aggregate, curate, and add intelligence to content, without specifically storing content or authoring in any way. In a sense they develop a “learning experience,” and they are all modeled after magazine-like interfaces that enables users to browse, read, consume, and rate content.

The second category the “program experience platforms” or “learning delivery systems.” These companies, which include vendors like NovoEd, EdX, Intrepid, Everwise, and many others (including many LMS vendors), help you build a traditional learning “program” in an open and easy way. They offer pathways, chapters, social features, and features for assessment, scoring, and instructor interaction. While many of these features belong in an LMS, these systems are built in a modern cloud architecture, and they are effective for programs like sales training, executive development, onboarding, and more. In many ways you can consider them “open MOOC platforms” that let you build your own MOOCs.

The third category at the top I call “micro-learning platforms” or “adaptive learning platforms.” These are systems that operate more like intelligent, learning-centric content management systems that help you take lots of content, arrange it into micro-learning pathways and programs, and serve it up to learners at just the right time. Qstream, for example, has focused initially on sales training – and clients tell me it is useful at using spaced learning to help sales people stay up to speed (they are also entering the market for management development). Axonify is a fast-growing vendor that serves many markets, including safety training and compliance training, where people are reminded of important practices on a regular basis, and learning is assessed and tracked. Vendors in this category, again, offer LMS-like functionality, but in a way that tends to be far more useful and modern than traditional LMS systems. And I expect many others to enter this space.

Perhaps the most exciting part of tools today is the growth of AI and machine-learning systems, as well as the huge potential for virtual reality.

A Digital Learning Architecture

7) Traditional Coaching, Training, and Culture of Learning Has Not Gone Away

The importance of culture and management

8) A New Business Model for Learning

he days of spending millions of dollars on learning platforms is starting to come to an end. We do have to make strategic decisions about what vendors to select, but given the rapid and immature state of the market, I would warn against spending too much money on any one vendor at a time. The market has yet to shake out, and many of these vendors could go out of business, be acquired, or simply become irrelevant in 3-5 years.

9) The Impact of Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Slack Is Coming

The newest versions of Microsoft Teams, Google Hangouts and Google Drive, Workplace by Facebook, Slack, and other enterprise IT products now give employees the opportunity to share content, view videos, and find context-relevant documents in the flow of their daily work.

We can imagine that Microsoft’s acquisition of LinkedIn will result in some integration of Lynda.com content in the flow of work. (Imagine if you are trying to build a spreadsheet and a relevant Lynda course opens up). This is an example of “delivering learning to where people are.”

New work environments will be learning environments

10) A new set of skills and capabilities in L&D

It’s no longer enough to consider yourself a “trainer” or “instructional designer” by career. While instructional design continues to play a role, we now need L&D to focus on “experience design,” “design thinking,” the development of “employee journey maps,” and much more experimental, data-driven, solutions in the flow of work.

lmost all the companies are now teaching themselves design thinking, they are using MVP (minimal viable product) approaches to new solutions, and they are focusing on understanding and addressing the “employee experience,” rather than just injecting new training programs into the company.
New Capabilities Needed

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more on elearning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=elearning

games teach thinking skills

SCHOOL USES VIDEO GAMES TO TEACH THINKING SKILLS


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More on gaming and education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

IM554 discussion on GBL

IM554 discussion on Game Based Learning

Here is the “literature”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/03/19/recommendations-for-games-and-gaming-at-lrs/
this link reflects my recommendations to the SCSU library, based on my research and my publication: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

Here are also Slideshare shows from conferences’ presentations on the topic:

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gamification-and-byox-in-academic-libraries-low-end-practical-approach

https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/gaming-and-gamification-in-academic-and-library-settings

Topic :Gaming and Gamification in Academic Settings

  1. Intro: why is it important to discuss this trend
    1. The fabric of the current K12 and higher ed students: Millennials and Gen Z
    2. The pedagogical theories and namely constructivism
      1. Csikszentmihalyi’s “flow” concept (being in the zone)
      2. Active learning
      3. Sociocultural Theory
      4. Project-Based Learning
    3. The general milieu of increasing technology presence, particularly of gaming environment
    4. The New Media Consortium and the Horizon Report

Discussion: Are the presented reasons sufficient to justify a profound restructure of curricula and learning spaces?

  1. Definition and delineation
    1. Games
    2. Serious Games
    3. Gamification
    4. Game-based learning
    5. Digital game-based learning
    6. Games versus gamification
    7. Simulations, the new technological trends such as human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: Is there a way to build a simpler but comprehensive structure/definition to encompass the process of gaming and gamification in education?

  1. Gaming and Gamification
    1. Pros
    2. Cons
    3. Debates

Discussion: Which side are you on and why?

  1. Gaming and Gamification and BYOD (or BYOx)
    1. gaming consoles versus gaming over wi-fi
    2. gaming using mobile devices instead of consoles
    3. human-computer interaction (HCI) such as augmented reality (AR),virtual reality (VR) and mixed reality (MR) (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/02/22/virtual-augmented-mixed-reality/ )

Discussion: do you see a trend to suggest that either one or the other will prevail? Convergence?

  1. Gaming in Education
    1. student motivation, student-centered learning, personalized learning
    2. continued practice, clear goals and immediate feedback
    3. project-based learning, Minecraft and SimCity EDU
    4. Gamification of learning versus learning with games
    5. organizations to promote gaming and gamification in education (p. 6 http://scsu.mn/1F008Re)
    6. the “chocolate-covered broccoli” problem

Discussion: why gaming and gamification is not accepted in a higher rate? what are the hurdles to enable greater faster acceptance? What do you think, you can do to accelerate this process?

  1. Gaming in an academic library
    1. why the academic library? sandbox for experimentation
    2. the connection between digital literacy and gaming and gamificiation
    3. Gilchrist and Zald’s model for instruction design through assessment
    4. the new type of library instruction:
      in house versus out-of-the box games. Gamification of the process
      http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/

Discussion: based on the example (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/), how do you see transforming academic library services to meet the demands of 21st century education?

  1. Gaming, gamification and assessment (badges)
    1. inability of current assessments to evaluate games as part of the learning process
    2. “microcredentialing” through digital badges
    3. Mozilla Open Badges and Badgestack
    4. leaderboards

Discussion: How do you see a transition from the traditional assessment to a new and more flexible academic assessment?

Netlix and HBO on VR

Netflix and HBO launch virtual reality apps on Google Play

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More on on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=vr

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