InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'gaming' Category

Super Mario gets artificial intelligence

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 25th January 2015

Researchers create ‘self-aware’ Super Mario with artificial intelligence

http://mashable.com/2015/01/19/super-mario-artificial-intelligence/

A team of German researchers has used artificial intelligence to create a “self-aware” version of Super Mario who can respond to verbal commands and automatically play his own game.

Artificial Intelligence helps Mario play his own game

Students at the University of Tubingen have used Mario as part of their efforts to find out how the human brain works.

The cognitive modelling unit claim their project has generated “a fully functional program” and “an alive and somewhat intelligent artificial agent”.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/30879456

Can Super Mario Save Artificial Intelligence?

The most popular approaches today focus on Big Data, or mimicking humansthat already know how to do some task. But sheer mimicry breaks down when one gives a machine new tasks, and, as I explained a few weeks ago, Big Data approaches tend to excel at finding correlations without necessarily being able to induce the rules of the game. If Big Data alone is not a powerful enough tool to induce a strategy in a complex but well-defined game like chess, then that’s a problem, since the real world is vastly more open-ended, and considerably more complicated.

http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/can-super-mario-save-artificial-intelligence

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, gamification, gaming, student-centered learning | No Comments »

AI

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th January 2015

The Deep Mind of Dennis Hassabis

In the race to recruit the best AI talent, Google scored a coup by getting the team led by a former video game guru and chess prodigy

https://medium.com/backchannel/the-deep-mind-of-demis-hassabis-156112890d8a

the only path to developing really powerful AI would be to use this unstructured information. It’s also called unsupervised learning— you just give it data and it learns by itself what to do with it, what the structure is, what the insights are.

One of the people you work with at Google is Geoff Hinton, a pioneer of neural networks. Has his work been crucial to yours?

Sure. He had this big paper in 2006 that rejuvenated this whole area. And he introduced this idea of deep neural networks—Deep Learning. The other big thing that we have here is reinforcement learning, which we think is equally important. A lot of what Deep Mind has done so far is combining those two promising areas of research together in a really fundamental way. And that’s resulted in the Atari game player, which really is the first demonstration of an agent that goes from pixels to action, as we call it.

Posted in gaming, information technology, video | No Comments »

Games in the library

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th January 2015

Games in the library

bibliography and research

http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/index.html

Playing in the Past: A History of Games, Toys, and Puzzles in North American Libraries
Author(s): Scott Nicholson
Source: The Library Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 4 (October 2013), pp. 341-361
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/671913

demonstrate the different ways in which libraries have used games, toys, and puzzles over the last 150 years through bothcollections and services
p, 342 Defining games -
p. 348 Games as the Subject of Collections\
p. 350A significant shift in academic libraries is a focus on providing services to students. Since agrowing number of academic publications both current issues and back volumes

are ac-cessible online through library subscriptions, the physical space of academic libraries is notneeded for collections of periodicals. The concept of the “learning commons”has become
popular on US campuses in the past decade; it combines traditional library resources and
the availability of library staff members with group work spaces, computer access and assis-
tance, and writing assistance to provide one place where students can get assistance with
course work. In addition, many of these learning commons also include cafes, social spaces,
and other support of the social lives of students, and it is in this role that academic libraries
provide access to collections of games.

p. 357 Another upcoming area of gaming in libraries is gamification. Gamification is the application of game design elements to a nongame setting ðDeterding et al. 2011Þ.

————————————-

Nicholson, S. (2013, June). Exploring Gamification Techniques for Classroom Management. Paper Presented at Games+Learning+Society 9.0, Madison, WI

The concept of meaningful gamification is that the primary use of game layers is not to provide
external rewards, but rather to help participants find a deeper connection to the underyling topic

——————————-

 

More on games in education in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

Posted in educational technology, gamification, gaming | 1 Comment »

library collection of video games

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 8th January 2015

If you have a video game collection, how does your institution curate and preserve games that are in collections?  Do you have advice for selectors on what kinds of file formats to choose, or what techniques are required to ensure the long term usability of the games?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Simon W. Lee, MLIS

Inquiry Librarian

Lead, Learning Technologies

UCLA College (Powell) Library

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

220 Powell Library Building, Box 951450

Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1450

simonlee83@library.ucla.edu

(310) 825-6726

Posted in gaming | 11 Comments »

Sony CES 2015

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 6th January 2015

Sony CES 2015 press conference

http://live.cnet.com/Event/Sony_CES_2015_press_conference

 

Posted in gaming | No Comments »

Jeopardy-style Game in Google Spreadsheets

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 30th December 2014

How to Create a Jeopardy-style Game in Google Spreadsheets

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014/11/how-to-create-jeopardy-style-game-in.html

use Flippity

Posted in gamification, gaming, Google +, instructional technology, student-centered learning, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

Minecraft for Math

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 15th December 2014

6 Minecraft lesson ideas for your Common Core math class

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/12/01/minecraft-lesson-ideas-243


Minecraft EDU – Part 3: Mathematics on the Farm

http://www.classthink.com/2014/01/24/minecraft-edu-part-3-mathematics-farm/

Engage NY Module 3 Area and Perimeter Minecraft Math activity

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Engage-NY-Module-3-Area-and-Perimeter-Minecraft-Math-activity-1570866

Mathematica Minecraft

http://mathematica.stackexchange.com/questions/19669/mathematica-minecraft

 

Posted in educational technology, gamification, gaming, learning styles | No Comments »

Spatial History Project

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st December 2014

Spatial History Project

http://stanford.edu/group/spatialhistory/cgi-bin/site/index.php

Posted in e-learning, educational technology, gaming, information technology, instructional technology, Library and information science, media literacy | No Comments »

game-based learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 30th November 2014

The underlying assumption of an education system that relies so heavily on test-based assessment is that content is what matters.
For those who prioritize learning that can be measured using only quantitative assessments, game-based learning probably just looks like a way to increase student engagement and content retention. It might seem like a complex workbook, or an entertaining quiz. Perhaps game-based learning looks like a great tool for practice and drilling, like a super sophisticated flash-card system that makes memorization more fun. But this kind of thinking doesn’t take into account the broader understanding of what matters. Game-based learning is a great classroom tool because it allows for interdisciplinary learning through contextualized critical thinking and problem solving.
Games in the classroom can encourage students to understand subject matter in context — as part of a system. In contrast to memorization, drilling, and quizzing, which is often criticized because it focuses on facts in isolation, games force players to interact with problems in ways that take relationships into account. The content becomes useful insofar as it plays a part in a larger multi-modal system.

Definition
Game-based learning is an instructional method that allows students to experience, understand, and solve problems in the world of a particular subject, or system, from the inside.

One promise of game-based learning is that it has the potential of building comprehension and literacy rather than retention. It does this by combining instruction, practice, and assessment. Teachers become the facilitators of a process where instruction is experiential. Practice is project based, requiring students to solve new problems and address new challenges using the new ideas to which they’ve been introduced. And assessment no longer measures a student’s ability to regurgitate information, or to choose among multiple answers, but rather, to use the content, or subject matter, in context. Even more impressive is that in order to successfully manipulate one piece within a comprehensive and complex system, the students must understand every piece of the system.
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/tag/games/

 

Posted in gamification, gaming | 1 Comment »

Digital Games + Learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 19th November 2014

Guide to Digital Games + Learning

http://www.kqed.org/assets/pdf/news/MindShift-GuidetoDigitalGamesandLearning.pdf

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/11/the-mindshift-guide-to-digital-games-and-learning

ey ideas in game-based learning, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment. This guide makes sense of the available research and provides suggestions for practical use.

http://www.instituteofplay.org/

 

Posted in gamification, gaming, teaching | No Comments »