Archive of ‘gaming’ category

assessment and evaluation of serious games

Learners Assessment and Evaluationin Serious Games: Approachesand Techniques Review

Ibtissem Daoudi, Erwan Tranvouez Raoudha Chebil, Bernard Espinasse, and Wided Lejouad Chaari
https://www.academia.edu/37625162/Learners_Assessment_and_Evaluation_in_Serious_Games_Approaches_and_Techniques_Review
Overview of Crisis Management SG focused on their learners ’ assessment and evaluation capabilities. This synthesis can help researchers and gamecreators by enlighten the main criteria and techniques for learners ’ assessment andevaluation. The described benefits and limitations of each technique may facilitate thechoice of the most adequate way to evaluate a particular SG.

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more on serious games in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=serious+games

gamification and learning

Student Perceptions of Learning and Instructional Effectiveness in College Courses

https://www.ets.org/Media/Products/perceptions.pdf

Students’ Perception of Gamification in Learning and Education.

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-47283-6_6

College students’ perceptions of pleasure in learning – Designing gameful gamification in education

investigate behavioral and psychological metrics that could affect learner perceptions of technology

today’s learners spend extensive time and effort posting and commenting in social media and playing video games

Creating pleasurable learning experiences for learners can improve learner engagement.

uses game-design elements in non-gaming environments with the purpose of motivating users to behave in a certain direction (Deterding et al., 2011)

How can we facilitate the gamefulness of gamification?

Most gamified activities include three basic parts: “goal-focused activity, reward mechanisms, and progress tracking” (Glover, 2013, p. 2000).

gamification works similarly to the instructional methods in education – clear learning and teaching objectives, meaningful learning activities, and assessment methods that are aligned with the objectives

the design of seven game elements:

  • Storytelling: It provides the rules of the gamified activities. A good gamified activity should have a clear and simple storyboard to direct learners to achieve the goals. This game-design element works like the guidelines and directions of an instructional activity in class.
  • Levels: A gamified activity usually consists of different levels for learners to advance through. At each level, learners will face different challenges. These levels and challenges can be viewed as the specific learning objectives/competencies for learners to accomplish.
  • Points: Points pertain to the progress-tracking element because learners can gain points when they complete the quests.
  • Leaderboard: This element provides a reward mechanism that shows which learners are leading in the gamified activities. This element is very controversial when gamification is used in educational contexts because some empirical evidence shows that a leaderboard is effective only for users who are aggressive and hardcore players (Hamari, Koivisto, & Sarsa, 2014).
  • Badges: These serve as milestones to resemble the rewards that learners have achieved when they complete certain quests. This element works as the extrinsic motivation for learners (Kapp, 2012).
  • Feedback: A well-designed gamification interface should provide learners with timely feedback in order to help them to stay on the right track.
  • Progress: A progress-tracking bar should appear in the learner profile to remind learners of how many quests remain and how many quests they have completed.

Dominguez et al. (2013) suggested that gamification fosters high-order thinking, such as problem-solving skills, rather than factual knowledge. Critical thinking, which is commonly assessed in social science majors, is also a form of higher-order thinking.

Davis (1989) developed technology acceptance model (TAM) to help people understand how users perceive technologies. Pleasure, arousal, and dominance (PAD) emotional-state model that developed by Mehrabian (1995) is one of the fundamental design frameworks for scale development in understanding user perceptions of user-system interactions.

Technology Acceptance Model from Damian T. Gordon

Introduction of the basic emotional impact of environments from Sekine masato

Van der Heijdedn (2004) asserted that pleasurable experiences encouraged users to use the system for a longer period of time
Self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) has been integrated into the design of gamification and addressed the balance between learners’ extrinsic and intrinsic motivation.

Self determination theory from Jeannie Maraya
Ryan and Deci (2000) concluded that extrinsic rewards might suppress learners’ intrinsic motivation. Exploiting the playfulness and gamefulness in gamification, therefore, becomes extremely important, as it would employ the most effective approaches to engage learners.
Sweetser and Wyeth (2005) developed GameFlow as an evaluation model to measure player enjoyment in games
Fu, Su, and Yu (2009) adapted this scale to EGameFlow in order to measure college students’ enjoyment of e-learning games. EGameFlow is a multidimensional scale that consists of self-evaluated emotions.

Gamification and Flow from Martin Sillaots
Eppmann, Bekk, and Klein (2018) developed gameful experience scale (GAMEX) to measure gameful experiences for gamification contexts. one of the limitations of GAMEX to be used in education is that its effects on learning outcome has not been studied
the Big Five Model, which has been proposed as trait theory by McCrae & Costa (1989) and is widely accepted in the field, to measure the linkages between the game mechanics in gamification and the influences of different personality traits.

The Big Five Personality Model from Devina Srivastava

Storytelling in the subscale of Preferences for Instruction emphasizes the rules of the gamified learning environments, such as the syllabus of the course, the rubrics for the assignments, and the directions for tasks. Storytelling in the subscale of Preferences for Instructors’ Teaching Style focuses on the ways in which instructors present the content. For example, instructors could use multimedia resources to present their instructional materials. Storytelling in the subscale of Preferences for Learning Effectiveness emphasizes scaffolding materials for the learners, such as providing background information for newly introduced topics.

The effective use of badges would include three main elements: signifier, completion logic, and rewards (Hamari & Eranti, 2011). A useful badge needs clear goal-setting and prompt feedback. Therefore, badges correlate closely with the design of storytelling (rules) and feedback, which are the key game design elements in the subscale of Preferences for Instruction.

Students can use Google to search on their laptops or tablets in class when instructors introduce new concepts. By reading the reviews and viewing the numbers of “thumbs-up” (agreements by other users), students are able to select the best answers. Today’s learners also “tweet” on social media to share educational videos and news with their classmates and instructors. Well-designed gamified learning environments could increase pleasure in learning by allowing students to use familiar computing experiences in learning environments.

 

Gaming and Gamification for SPED 204

https://catalog.stcloudstate.edu/Catalog/ViewCatalog.aspx?pageid=viewcatalog&topicgroupid=1994&entitytype=CID&entitycode=SPED+204

SPED 204. Program Overview and E-Portfolio

Credits: 1
Department: Special Education
Description: Overview of the programmatic standards for general and special education, how these standards are integrated in special education curriculum, and e-portfolio requirements for documenting acquisition of the above standards.
  1. Gaming and Gamification.

    why Gaming and Gamification? Vygotsky and ZPD (immersive storytelling is a form of creative play)

    from: https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/blog.stcloudstate.edu/dist/d/10/files/2015/03/Gaming-and-Gamification-in-academic-and-library-settings-final-draft-1digudu.pdf
    play >>> games >>> serious games >>> Game Based learning >>>>+ Digital Game Based learning
    Games are type of cooperative learning. Games embody the essence of constructivism, which for students/gamers means constructing their own knowledge while they interact (learn cooperatively). Learning can happen without games, yet games accelerate the process. Games engage. Games, specifically digital ones, relate to the digital natives, those born after 1976 – 80, who are also known as Generation Y, or Millennials”

    is it generational? Is it a fad? is it counter-pedagogical?

    what is the difference between GBL (Game Based Learning) and DGBL (Digital GBL): share examples, opinions. Is one better / preferable then the other? Why?

    Kahoot game (Yahoo): https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/1412b52c-da28-4507-b658-7dfeedf0864c 
    hands-on assignment (10 min): split in groups and discuss your experience with games; identify your preferable mode (e.g. GBL vs DGBL) and draft a short plan of transitioning your current curricula to a curricula incorporating games.

    What is gamification? Why gamification, if we have games?
    “Gamification takes game elements (such as points, badges, leaderboards, competition, achievements) and applies them to a non – game setting. It has the potential to turn routine, mundane tasks into refreshing, motivating experiences

    let’s check our understanding of gamification: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/542b5b23-acbd-4575-998e-e199ea08b3e7

    hands-on assignment (10 min): split in groups and use your electronic devices: smartphones, tablets, laptops to experience any of the following gamification tools:

    The Future is Now:

    Hands-on assignment (10 min): Experience Oculus Go, Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear 360,  Vuze,
    create your own VR (video 360) orientation tours:

Games and Online Interactive Content

Wednesday, 11/21/2018 – Wednesday, 12/12/2018

Looking for a beginner’s crash course in game making software and process? Games can be an excellent teaching resource, and game development is easier than ever. Whether you’re looking to develop your own teaching resources or run a game-making program for users, this course will give you the information you need to choose the most appropriate software development tool, structure your project, and accomplish your goals. Plain language, appropriate for absolute beginners, and practical illustrative examples will be used. Participants will receive practical basic exercises they can complete in open source software, as well as guides to advanced educational resources and available tutorials.

This is a blended format web course:

The course will be delivered as 4 separate live webinar lectures, one per week on Wednesday November 21 and then repeating Wednesdays, November 28, December 5 and December 12 at Noon Central time. You do not have to attend the live lectures in order to participate. The webinars will be recorded and distributed through the web course platform for asynchronous participation. The web course space will also contain the exercises and discussions for the course.

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to name five different software tools available to assist them or their users in creating games and interactive web content, as well as identify the required knowledge and skills to effectively use each program.
  • Participants will be able to effectively structure the development process of a game from brainstorming to launch.
  • Participants will be able to identify and articulate areas in which games can increase educational effectiveness and provide practical, desirable skills.

Who Should Attend

Library staff looking to develop educational games or run game making programs for users (including tween or teen users).

Instructors

Ruby Warren

Ruby Warren believes in the power of play, and that learning is a lot more effective when it’s interactive. She is the User Experience Librarian at the University of Manitoba Libraries, where she recently completed a research leave focused on educational game prototype development, and has been playing games from around the time she developed object permanence.

<Cost

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

Moodle and Webinar login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date.

How to Register

Register here, courses are listed by date and you need to log in.

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more on games and libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games+library

Encyclopedia of Criminal Activities and the Deep Web

>>>>>>> Publishing Opportunity <<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Encyclopedia of Criminal Activities and the Deep Web

Countries all over the world are seeing significant increases in criminal activity through the use of technological tools. Such crimes as identity theft, cyberattacks, drug trafficking, and human trafficking are conducted through the deep and dark web, while social media is utilized by murderers, sex offenders, and pedophiles to elicit information and contact their victims. As criminals continue to harness technology to their advantage, law enforcement and government officials are left to devise alternative strategies to learn more about all aspects of these modern criminal patterns and behavior, to preserve the safety of society, and to ensure that proper justice is served. Regrettably, the lack of adequate research findings on these modern criminal activities is limiting everyone’s abilities to devise effective strategies and programs to combat these modern technology-related criminal activities.

In an effort to compile the most current research on this topic, a new major reference work titled Encyclopedia of Criminal Activities and the Deep Web is currently being developed. This comprehensive Encyclopedia is projected to encompass expert insights about the nature of these criminal activities, how they are conducted, and societal and technological limitations. It will also explore new methods and processes for monitoring and regulating the use of these tools, such as social media, online forums, and online ads, as well as hidden areas of the internet including the deep and dark web. Additionally, this Encyclopedia seeks to offer strategies for predicting and preventing criminals from using technology as a means to track, stalk, and lure their victims.

You are cordially invited to share your research to be featured in this Encyclopedia by submitting a chapter proposal/abstract using the link on the formal call for papers page here. If your chapter proposal is accepted, guidelines for preparing your full chapter submission (which should be between 5,000-7,500 total words in length) can be accessed at: http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/ (under the “For Authors” heading – “Encyclopedia Chapter Organization and Formatting”).

Recommended topics for papers include, but are not limited to:

  • Bitcoin and Crime
  • Botnets and Crime
  • Child Exploitation
  • Contract Killing
  • Criminology
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Cyber Espionage
  • Cyber Stalking
  • Cybercrime
  • Cybercriminals
  • Cybersecurity Legislation
  • Cyberterrorism Fraud
  • Dark Web
  • Dark Web Vendors
  • Darknets
  • Data Privacy
  • Dating Websites and Crime
  • Deep Web
  • Drug Trafficking
  • E-Banking Fraud
  • Email Scams
  • Fraud and Internet
  • Gaming and Crime
  • Government Regulations of the Dark Web
  • Hacking and Crime
  • Hacktivism
  • Human Trafficking
  • Identity Theft
  • International Regulations of the Dark Web
  • Internet Privacy
  • Internet Regulations
  • Internet Safety & Crime
  • Online Advertisement Websites and Crime
  • Online Blackmail
  • Online Forums and Crime
  • Online Hate Crimes
  • Online Predators
  • Online Privacy
  • Social Media Deception
  • Social Networking Traps
  • Undercover Dark Web Busts
  • Undercover Operations
  • Vigilante Justice
  • Virtual Currencies & Crime
  • Whistleblowing

IMPORTANT DATES: Chapter Proposal Submission Deadline: October 15, 2018; Full Chapters Due: December 15, 2018

Note: There are no publication fees, however, contributors will be requested to provide a courtesy to their fellow colleagues by serving as a peer reviewer for this project for at least 2-3 articles. This will ensure the highest level of integrity and quality for the publication. 

Should you have any questions regarding this publication, or this invitation, please do not hesitate to contact: EncyclopediaCADW@igi-global.com

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, DBA
Editor-in-Chief
Encyclopedia of Criminal Activities and the Deep Web
EncyclopediaCADW@igi-global.com

gaming and gamification abroad

Wie kann man Lehrer an das Thema"Gaming" heranführen? Das ist gar nicht so schwer, meint Jürgen Sleegers, wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Institut für Medienforschung und Medienpädagogik der TH Köln. #pb18 #fachtagung #perspektive #begabung #bildungundbegabung #smart #smartbilden #smartfoerdern #digitalisierung #gaming #education #computerspiele #learninggames #digitalepädagogik #seriousgames #spielen #spielraum #medienforschung #medienpädagogik @th_koeln @juergensleegers

A post shared by Bildung & Begabung (@bildungbegabung) on

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Как измерить результат игры в обучении

https://goo.gl/ttpDZ5 

http://blog.center-game.com/business/rezultat.html

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Simple mapa para navegar territorios lúdicos 🌐🎲 — #gamification #gamedesign #seriousplay #games #playcoaching #canvas #gbl #gba #gamebased #learning #assessment #facilitation #gamefulness #gamify #play #aprenderjugando #ludificacion #juegoserio #homoludens #seriousgames #ludification #ludens #fun #playful #design

A post shared by Ludens (@ludens.online) on

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more on gaming in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming

gamification
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

Fortnite is good for children

No, Fortnite Isn’t Rotting Kids’ Brains. It May Even Be Good for Them

The popular video game holds promise, but adults should keep on top of kids’ online behaviors

By Kurt Dean Squire & Matthew Gaydos August 8, 2018
https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/08/08/no-fortnite-isnt-rotting-kids-brains-it.html
Playing video-game shooters, we now know, is not a major contributor to youth violence. Granted, kids’ enthusiasm for Fortnite can be a little much, but we are old enough to remember Garbage Pail kids and have played Pokémon.
Fortnite is, in many respects, a classic “third place”—a place that is neither home nor school, but where kids can socialize and play beyond the watchful eyes of parents or teachers. These are places where kids learn to negotiate conflict, become independent, and explore what kind of person they want to be. They are important experiences that we too often design out of our kids’ lives through structured activities and all of the shuffling back and forth we do in today’s busy world.
we’ve seen that one of the best things educators can do is bystander training.

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more on Fortnite in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fortnite

Immersive Storytelling and Learning

An Imaginary Interview with Lev Vygotsky on Immersive Storytelling and Learning

Ulla, Founder and CEO of ThingLink

https://medium.com/@ulla/an-imaginary-interview-with-lev-vygotsky-on-immersive-storytelling-and-learning-5bbb211c6e50

digital storytelling at the Festival Della Didattica Digitale (Digital Teaching Festival) in Italy.

the trending but undefined concepts of digital storytelling and immersive learning

definition

Storytelling is a logical form of thought. It is an analytical process including perception, labeling, organizing, categorizing real and imaginary objects and their real and imaginary relations in speech.

Q: What do you think immersive documentation technologies such as 360 images and videos can bring to this process?

V: 360 degree media and virtual reality are cultural-historically developed tools that mediate our relationship to the world in a new way. They expand the possible fields of perception transcending space and time. Perception precedes other psychological functions.

Definition

Immersive storytelling can be understood as an activity through which students use language to visualize relations and meaning in 360 degree digital environments. Naming or describing relations between objects in our field of perception using verbal or visual language awakens intellectual processes fundamental to learning.

Q: Would you say immersive storytelling is a form of creative play?

V: That is a possible interpretation. Play is a psychological process through which we create an imaginary situation or place, reflecting or separating objects and their actual meaning, or creating new meanings. The ability to digitally create and modify situations and environments can be understood as a form of play, opening a realm of spontaneity and freedom, connected with pleasure.

Q: Can robots help us learn? Is AI already the More Knowledgeable Other?

V: The More Knowledgeable Other (MKO) refers to anyone or anything who has a better understanding or a higher ability level than the learner, with respect to a particular task, process, or concept. If a robot with artificial intelligence can function as an MKO and support our problem solving, it can expand our Zone of Proximal Development.

VR AR MR apps for education

4 Augmented and Virtual Reality Projects That Point to the Future of Education

By Justin Hendrix     Jan 3, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-03-4-augmented-and-virtual-reality-projects-that-point-to-the-future-of-education

At NYC Media Lab recent Exploring Future Reality conference, long-time educators including Agnieszka Roginska of New York University and Columbia University’s Steven Feiner pointed to emerging media as a way to improve multi-modal learning for students and train computer systems to understand the world around us.

the Lab has completed dozens of rapid prototyping projectsexhibited hundreds of demos from the corporate, university and entrepreneurship communities; helped new startups make their mark; and hosted three major events, all to explore emerging media technologies and their evolving impact.

Kiwi

Mobile AR

https://medium.com/@nycmedialab/14-virtual-and-augmented-reality-projects-emerging-from-nyc-media-lab-this-spring-af65ccb6bdd8

Kiwi enhances learning experiences by encouraging active participation with AR and social media. A student can use their smartphone or tablet to scan physical textbooks and unlock learning assistance tools, like highlighting, note creation and sharing, videos and AR guides—all features that encourage peer-to-peer learning. (my note, as reported at the discussion at the QQLM conference in Crete about Zois Koukopoulos, Dimitrios Koukopoulos Augmented Reality Dissemination and Exploitation Services for Libraries: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/21/measuring-learning-outcomes-of-new-library-initiatives/

Street Smarts VR

Training and simulations for police  https://streetsmartsvr.com/

Street Smarts VR is a startup that is working to provide solutions for a major issue facing America’s communities: conflicts between police officers and citizens.

NYC Media Lab recently collaborated with Bloomberg and the augmented reality startup Lampix on a fellowship program to envision the future of learning in the workplace. Lampix technology looks like it sounds: a lamp-like hardware that projects AR capabilities, turning any flat surface into one that can visualize data and present collaborative workflows.

Calling Thunder: The Unsung History of Manhattan

Calling Thunder: The Unsung History of Manhattan, a project that came out of a recent fellowship program with A+E Networks, re-imagines a time before industrialization, when the City we know now was lush with forests, freshwater ponds, and wildlife.

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more on VR and education
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education
more on AR in education
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=augmented+reality+education

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