InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'learning styles' Category

Early Learners’ Tech Use

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 16th October 2014

‘Screen Time’ Alone Too Limited a Gauge of Early Learners’ Tech Use, Report Says

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2014/10/screen_time_early_learners_RAND.html

screen time as the sole measure of what’s OK for children is no longer adequate, the RAND researchers argue that screen-time limits shoudn’t go the way of the VCR:

Limits on screen time may remain important in restricting use that is passive, sedentary, or noneducational, and they may also prove useful in ensuring that children engage in a balanced combination of activities.

However, a more-comprehensive definition of developmentally appropriate technology use will empower ECE providers and families to make better decisions about the ways in which young children use technology–and help maximize the benefits young children receive from this use.

my note: information on Pinterest still goes the other direction. E.g.:
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/284923113897755173/
screen time

Posted in digital identity, digital naitives, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, online learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

learning styles

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 2nd October 2014

learning styles and study tips

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/10/new-interesting-visual-on-learning.html

learning styles and study tips

Posted in learning, learning styles | No Comments »

Comics in Education

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 9th September 2014

http://www.comiclife.com/

http://chogger.com/

http://www.bitstripsforschools.com/

Posted in e-learning, gaming, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, media literacy, mobile apps, Multiple intelligences | No Comments »

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 2nd September 2014

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

http://www.edudemic.com/open-badges-in-education/

Higher education institutions are abuzz with the concept of Open Badges. The concept was presented to SCSU CETL some two years ago, but it remained mute on the SCSU campus. Part of the presentation to the SCSU CETL included the assertion that “Some advocates have suggested that badges representing learning and skills acquired outside the classroom, or even in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), will soon supplant diplomas and course credits.”

For higher education institutions interested in keeping pace, establishing a digital ecosystem around badges to recognize college learning, skill development and achievement is less a threat and more an opportunity. Used properly, Open Badge systems help motivate, connect, articulate and make transparent the learning that happens inside and outside classrooms during a student’s college years.

Educational programs that use learning design to attach badges to educational experiences according to defined outcomes can streamline credit recognition.

The badge ecosystem isn’t just a web-enabled transcript, CV, and work portfolio rolled together. It’s also a way to structure the process of education itself. Students will be able to customize learning goals within the larger curricular framework, integrate continuing peer and faculty feedback about their progress toward achieving those goals, and tailor the way badges and the metadata within them are displayed to the outside world.

 

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, evaluation, learning styles, Multiple intelligences, pedagogy, teaching | No Comments »

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st September 2014

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/05/math-science-history-games-break-boundaries-between-subjects-interdisciplinary-learning/

possibilities for a formal Renaissance-Man-Liberal-Arts education remain limited to the elite. The average, or common, student is encouraged to choose majors and institutions that track into a specialized vocation.

MincraftEDU and SimCityEDU provide flexible options for integrating familiar games with traditional classroom curriculum.

The ability to apply knowledge across disciplines is important, but it is not enough. It is important to combine that knowledge with strong social and emotional skills that serve as the foundation for good citizenship in the 21st Century.

The MindShift Guide to Games and Learning

more on gaming in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

Posted in gamification, gaming, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, Multiple intelligences, online learning, open learning, Project Based Learning, student-centered learning | No Comments »

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 24th June 2014

Employers’ Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/employers-challenge-to-educators-make-school-relevant-to-students-lives

while critical thinking and communication are important, Wagner said schools are in danger if they stop there. “Above all, they need to be creative problem solvers,”

a bottom-up and top-down strategy should be implemented
the bottom-up strategy will only work, if it’s accompanied by business leaders clearly articulating the outcomes they’d like to see and helping align accountability to those outcomes.

Recently elite liberal arts colleges like Hampshire and Bard have announced they won’t consider SAT or ACT scores if they’re submitted with an application, because admissions officers don’t believe the tests are a good measure of students’ potential.

The survey found that student who felt supported — that their professors cared about them as individuals, that professors made them want to learn, that they had a mentor — were three times more likely to thrive as those who did not feel supported. Only 14 percent of college graduates answered that all three of those qualities were present in their college experience.

Even fewer college graduates found their higher education experience to be relevant to life and work after college. Only six percent reported with strong affirmatives that they worked on a long term project (at least a semester), had an internship where they could apply skills, and were very engaged in an extracurricular.

Posted in learning, learning styles, student-centered learning | No Comments »

Backchannel: is it only K12 moving that direction?

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 28th May 2014

backchannel – a digital conversation that runs concurrently with a face-to-face activity — provides students with an outlet to engage in conversation.

In a recent article by Edutopia:
The Backchannel: Giving Every Student a Voice in the Blended Mobile Classroom. (n.d.). Edutopia. Retrieved May 28, 2014, from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/backchannel-student-voice-blended-classroom-beth-holland

the author brings yet another argument in support of using the BYOD movement in K12 to promote usage of mobile devices and social media FOR the learning process, rather then seeking ways to shut them off.
It seems that Higher Ed is lagging behind in their paradigm shift toward Backchanneling.
What do you think must be done at SCSU to seek the usage of mobile devices and/or social media to involved students in the learning process?

Posted in e-learning, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, social media, technology literacy | 1 Comment »

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 21st April 2014

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/10/for-students-why-the-question-is-more-important-than-the-answer/

It’s a bit like the Socratic method flipped on its head.

Rule 1: Ask As Many Questions as You Can (Gives License to Ask). There are a number of potential stumbling blocks related to this rule, including:

  • Students struggle trying to produce the questions:
  • Students ask for examples:
  • Groups are working at different pace:
  • Some students are not participating or one student is producing all the questions:

Rule 2: Do Not Stop to Discuss, Judge, or Answer Any Question (Creates Safe Space and Protection).

Rule 3: Write Down Every Question Exactly as It Is Stated (Levels the Playing Field So All Questions and Voices Are Respected.)

Rule 4: Change Any Statement into a Question (Insists on the Discipline of Phrasing, Asking, and Thinking in Questions, Not Statement). Potential challenges that may arise with rule 4 include:

  • Students get off task and start talking:
  • Students are confused about the instructions:
  • The QFocus is not working:

Posted in learning, learning styles, student-centered learning, teaching | No Comments »

Peer to peer online tutoring: practical and empirical results

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 19th April 2014

https://www.brainfuse.com/home/peers.asp

http://www.magazine.utoronto.ca/life-on-campus/donny-ouyang-online-peer-tutoring/

https://peers.aristotlecircle.com/page/1-to-1-in-home-tutoring

http://study-guide-services-review.toptenreviews.com/what-is-peer-to-peer-tutoring.html

http://www.azcentral.com/news/arizona/articles/20130426education-nation-peer-tutoring-gets-high-tech-makeover.html

http://jobs.aol.com/videos/job-search/rayku-p2p-online-tutoring-program-startup-presentation/517175995/

Peer reviewed (please consider LRS online dbase to retrieve):
Westera, W., De Bakker, G., & Wagemans, L. (2009). Self-arrangement of fleeting student pairs: a Web 2.0 approach for peer tutoring. Interactive Learning Environments17(4), 341-349. doi:10.1080/10494820903195249

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d45141111%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

http://ascilite.org.au/ajet/ajet26/mcloughlin.html
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036013150600090X

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0740818807000448

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S8755461507000734

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02602930410001689144#.U1J_MvldWSo

Interesting conference proceedings:
Gaofeng, R., & Yeyu, L. (2007). An Online Peer Assisted Learning Community Model and its Application in ZJNU.Online Submission,

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dED500172%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

A model to consider, if you have a higher ed instution in the vicinity and replace freshman students with K12 ones. I like how the authors further classified the tutors into 3 categories:

De Smet, M., Van Keer, H., & Valcke, M. (2008). Blending asynchronous discussion groups and peer tutoring in higher education: An exploratory study of online peer tutoring behaviour. Computers & Education50207-223. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2006.05.001

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/eds/detail?vid=4&sid=2fae304e-fee9-4a4f-8119-386670956bbb%40sessionmgr111&hid=106&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ%3d%3d#db=edselp&AN=S036013150600090X

This is the foundation, which the startup companies from Sillicon Valley are using to make money:
Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., Kester, L., & Sloep, P. (2013). Cognitive load and knowledge sharing in Learning Networks. Interactive Learning Environments21(1), 89-100. doi:10.1080/10494820.2010.548068

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d85198881%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

this is old, but you can take the concepts and apply them right toward your research of using CAI
Dewey, D. P., & Cannon, A. E. (2006). Supporting technology instruction through peer tutoring, discussion boards and electronic journals. IALLT Journal Of Language Learning Technologies38(2), 17.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dedo%26AN%3d24660100%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

this one goes towad
Mengping, T. (2014). Mathematics Synchronous Peer Tutoring System for Students with Learning Disabilities.Journal Of Educational Technology & Society17(1), 115-127.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d94937804%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Tsuei, M. (2012). Using Synchronous Peer Tutoring System to Promote Elementary Students’ Learning in Mathematics. Computers & Education58(4), 1171-1182.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ955399%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

Posted in Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, Multiple intelligences, online learning, student-centered learning, teaching, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st November 2013

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/10/16/howard-gardner-multiple-intelligences-are-not-learning-styles/

Gardner now teaches at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is the author of  numerous books on intelligence and creativity. His new book  ”The App Generation,” co-authored with Katie Davis, explains how life for young people today is different than before the dawn of the digital age, and will be published on Oct. 22  by Yale University Press.

Gardner’s theory initially listed seven intelligences which  work together: linguistic, logical-mathematical,  musical,  bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, interpersonal and intrapersonal; he later added an eighth, naturalist intelligence and says there may be a few more.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Excerpts from the blog entries under the article

Emily Sedlock

The idea that multiple intelligences and learning styles have become interrelated is so true. Learning about all the different types of intelligences and learning, it can be hard to keep them all straight. This article was helpful in pointing out the differences. Educators should be aware of these differences, so that they might be able to better teach their students.

GRoo

1) Learning
The basis:
- how how human capacities are represented in the brain,
Multiple Intelligences:
- a number of relatively independent mental faculties
- a number of relatively autonomous computers—[that compute] … information
A strong intelligence:
- an area where the person has considerable computational power
What matters
- the power of the mental computer, the intelligence, that acts upon that sensory information, once picked up
So “learning” = us[ing ... (different) cognitive faculties?
Q1: Is that ok to assume and say?
Q2: What of "dimensions" - cognitive processing (higher order thinking) and knowledge (concrete to abstract) and sense of self, or affect[ive]?

2) Teaching
- Individualize your teaching
- Pluralize your teaching. Teach important materials in several ways, …reach students who learn in different ways… [present] materials in various ways

Posted in learning styles, Multiple intelligences | No Comments »