InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'learning' Category

SCSU Tech Survey

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th February 2015

2015.02.13 ITS TechFeeSurvey2014 Presentation

Q14 What technology devices you currently own?

Q15 What technology devices do you plan to purchase in the next year?

Q17 How often do you use the following programs and services?

Posted in educational technology, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, online learning, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th February 2015

Differences between Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/staff/resources/tutorials/content/Differences_between_Discussion_Boards__Blogs_and_Wikis.html

Differences

Discussion Forums are TOPIC centred.

  • discussions are organised into topics by ‘threads’
  • anyone in the community can start a thread on a topic of their choosing
  • all participants have an equal voice
  • posts require someone to reply for a discussion to take place
  • you can follow through a thread on a particular topic
Blogs are AUTHOR centred.

  • posts are made by the blog’s author only (may be a group)
  • posts are usually opinion pieces and written in the authors voice
  • readers can add comments to the author’s post
  • organised in reverse chronological order so the most recent posts show on the entry page
  • reflect the authors identity in the tone, look and feel and content
Wikis are CONTENT/DOCUMENT centred.

  • wikis are for group authoring
  • editable website with a complete version history kept
  • aim is to reach a consensus or compromise on the content of the page
  • the focus is the content produced, not the individual authors
  • usually neutral and objective
  • discussion/comment is separated from the wiki content

Posted in blog, Digital literacy, Discussion List, e-learning, instructional technology, online learning, open learning, social media | No Comments »

games for building and exploration

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 9th February 2015

Beyond Minecraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/beyond-minecraft-games-that-inspire-building-and-exploration/

1. Garry’s Mod 

garryscreenshotGarry’s Mod (GMod) is a sandbox game like Minecraft but instead of building and exploring, students use a fun physics engine that simulates things like gravity and mass. They also use a virtual toy box of assets from Valve Software’s popular games. The tool is a step up in complexity from the elegant simplicity of Minecraft, but with Garry’s Mod, students are exposed to physics concepts while having madcap fun.

2. Kerbal Space Program

kerbal_screenshotKerbal Space Program has a robust physics engine too, but it’s more focused than Garry’s Mod. Players purchase rocket parts, put them together, and then see if they can get a ship into orbit, to one of two moons, or even to another planet. These aren’t easy tasks, so play is focused on trial and error testing, and, like Minecraft, seeking help from the community is part of a successful strategy.

3. Sound Shapes 

soundshapes_screenshotSound Shapes is a visually stunning platform puzzle game set to a rich musical soundscape. Even better: students can create and share their own levels – like interactive sheet music — using sounds and objects unlocked by playing the platform game. It’s an accessible entry point into musical composition as well as game design, and provides an experience that builds on the creativity of Minecraft while offering something wholly unique for music lovers.

4. DIY

DIYFor creative kids who want to get their hands dirty, check out DIY, a site where students can find things to build, instructions for how to build them, and ways to share their creations with others. All projects are aligned to 50 skills that run the gamut from outdoors to indoors, and feature various challenges to complete and cool badges to earn and display.

5. STENCYL

screen568x568Computer programming is a great next step for students who love to mod Minecraft or toy around with the redstone resource (which simulates basic logic and circuitry). One solid entry-level tool is Stencyl, a game creation program focused on codeless, cross-platform game making. By snapping blocks of code together, students can create games that can be published and played on a variety of platforms including mobile phones.

6. CODECADEMY

Codecademy is a web-based, self-paced site that teaches actual industry-standard languages like PHP, Javascript, Python, Ruby, HTML, and CSS. While students don’t create publishable games like they would in Stencyl, their learning is purpose-driven and contextualized, e.g. JavaScript for web development or Ruby for app development. And students do get to see their code’s output directly onscreen.

Minecraft has introduced a lot of youth to games as well as the critical thinking, problem solving, and creation skills necessary for self-motivated learning. The games and sites on this list have the potential to extend that learning, providing fresh outlets for self-expression in the digital world and beyond.

More on gaming in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=minecraft

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

Posted in gamification, gaming | 1 Comment »

badges

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 4th February 2015

4 Benefits To Using Badges In Online Learning

http://elearningindustry.com/using-badges-in-online-learning

greater autonomy for students, greater levels of feedback, and a variety of assignments.

More on badges in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges

In each of the classes for which I use badges I have 24 different badges that students can earn. Each one is a “micro-assignment” which asks students to apply some concept or set of concepts we are covering in the class. Students submit their responses and if they meet the badge criteria they earn the badge. When they earn a badge they receive the points for that in their grades and also receive a badge graphic uploaded to their own personal profile which only they can see. One feature I would like to incorporate is the ability to share these badges via their social networks but I am not sure about how this would work with regard to FERPA requirements. More research on my part is needed regarding this.

If the student does not earn the badge, they are provided with detailed feedback and allowed to resubmit to try and earn the badge. They can submit as many times as they want or need to in order to earn the badge. Students need to earn a minimum of 14 badges to earn a C in the course and 18 badges to earn an A.

Posted in gamification, gaming, instructional technology, learning, mobile learning, online learning, pedagogy | No Comments »

research with social media

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd February 2015

Doctoral Cohorts and Research using Social Media

Explore social media sites to find out what is the most pertinent “talk” in your scientific community. What are the latest trends and discussions, topics of research and interests. Most prominent social media sites, such as
LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/
Twitter, https://twitter.com/
Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/
Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/
Instagram, http://instagram.com/
use hashtags.
LinkedIn has “professional groups.”

Identify your hashtag strategy similarly to your keyword strategy when searching peer-reviewed articles

  E.g., if your interest is #principalship, you can seek channels and conversations by using it as a hashtag

  Search and subscribe to LinkedIn “Interests/Groups” and lurk or actively participate in the conversations.

  Consider start and maintenance of your own blog with your daily reflections on your research progress

  E.g., LinkedIn can be very much used as a blog, although you can subscribe for a free one such as Edublog

p. 141. Chapter 8 “Using Social Media in Research.”
Bell, J. (1999). Doing your research project: A guide for first-time researchers in education and social science (3rd ed.). Buckingham [England] ; Philadelphia: Open University Press. (Available on Google and at SCSU Library through ILL)

Crowdsourcing, social networking. Consider the following questions:

  1. What are your goals?
  2. Who do you want to reach?
  3. Why do you want to reach them?
  4. Which digital tool or platform will be most effective in enabling you to reach your goals?
  5. If you already spend time each day using social media for personal reasons, how much time are you able to set aside each day to use social media for research?
  6. at what time of day will you engage in social media? (time differences, if you are communicating globally)

the value of social media: Community, Content, Conversations.

 

Davis III, C.H.F., Deil-Amen, R., Rios-Aguilar, C., & González Canché, M.S. Social media and higher education: A literature review and research directions. Report printed by the University of Arizona and Claremont Graduate University. Accessed January 27, 2015 http://works.bepress.com/hfdavis/2/

 

Posted in Digital literacy, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, Library and information science, mobile apps, mobile learning, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

Wearable APP concepts

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st February 2015

Wearable APP concepts

http://www.wired.com/2014/03/3-insights-wearable-design-smart-concept-epileptics/

What’s the “killer app” for wearables? Think context.

https://gigaom.com/2014/01/16/whats-the-killer-app-for-wearables-think-context/

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1664771/wearable-technology-should-be-simpler-here-are-eight-ideas

Apple Watch App Concepts

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=wearable

http://theultralinx.com/2013/06/22-beautiful-ios-app-concepts-dribbble.html

PR, N. (2014, August 5). Accenture and Philips announce proof of concept app to show how ALS patients could gain greater control of their lives through brain, voice and eye commands. PR Newswire US.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpwh%26AN%3d201408050800PR.NEWS.USPR.MM82099%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

ABI, R. (0002, April). In-vehicle Wearable Integration to Accelerate Convergence; Global Penetration in New Cars to Exceed 90% by 2019, Says ABI Research. Business Wire (English).

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dpwh%26AN%3dbizwire.c53167782%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

P.B. (2003). Is THIS the industry’s next killer app?. Solid State Technology, 46(7), 26.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d10208309%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite

 

 

Posted in Digital literacy, e-learning, educational technology, information technology, instructional technology, mobile apps, mobile devices, mobile learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

wearables by Microsoft Facebook and Google

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 27th January 2015

The competition narrows down between Microsoft HoloLens, Facebook Oculus and Google Glass. Each of them bets on different possibilities, which wearable bring.

Facebook Oculus

https://www.oculus.com/


Also available as podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/apm-marketplace-tech/id73330855

http://techcrunch.com/2014/09/20/oculus-platform/

Microsoft HoloLens

http://www.microsoft.com/microsoft-hololens/en-us

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/01/25/microsofts-hololens/

Google Glass

http://www.google.com/glass/start/

Pls consider our related IMS blog entries:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=wearable

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=google+glass

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=oculus

Posted in Facebook, mobile devices, mobile learning | No Comments »

creativity

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 25th January 2015

How creative are you? The following test helps you determine if you have the personality traits, attitudes, values, motivations, and interests that characterize creativity. It is based on several years’ study of attributes possessed by men and women in a variety of fields and occupations who think and act creatively.

Take this test by Kellogg School of Northwestern University

http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/faculty/uzzi/ftp/page176.html
my score is 81

Useful Creativity Tests

http://www.creativecorporateculture.com/useful-creativity-tests/

Is it possible to measure creativity?

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/04/is-it-possible-to-measure-creativity/

Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development at the University of Georgia

 

Posted in learning | No Comments »

Microsoft’s HoloLens

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 25th January 2015

Microsoft’s HoloLens explained: How it works and why it’s different

http://www.cnet.com/news/microsoft-hololens-explained-how-it-works-and-why-its-different/

Microsoft’s HoloLens prototype has all the innards of a computer built directly into the headset. That means no cords or even a smartphone required.

Just as VR rivals Oculus (owned by Facebook) and Google are trying to reimagine virtual experiences with their head-worn devices, Microsoft wants us to imagine a world without screens, where information merely floats in front of you.

 

Posted in gaming, information technology, mobile devices, mobile learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

Games and the Brain

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 25th January 2015

This Is Your Brain On Games

http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/this-is-your-brain-on-games/

“Action video games have a number of ingredients that are actually really powerful for brain plasticity, learning, attention, and vision,” says brain scientist Daphne Bavelier in her TED Talk on the subject.

In February, Italian researchers found that playing fast-paced video games can improve the reading skills of children with dyslexia.

In 2012, scientists at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that high school gamers who played video games two hours a day were better at performing virtual surgery than non-gaming medical residents.

Posted in brain, Digital literacy, gaming, learning | No Comments »