immersive journalism, games, and empathy

Virtual reality breathes life into immersive storytelling

Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

James Delahoussaye

Project Syria, a virtual reality experience built by a team of students at USC.

“I sometimes call virtual reality an empathy generator,” she says. “It’s astonishing to me. People all of a sudden connect to the characters in a way that they don’t when they’ve read about it in the newspaper or watched it on TV.”

What Peña’s doing — using virtual reality in combination with reporting — is part of a wider landscape of video games being created to explore the news. And they’re called, appropriately enough, “newsgames.”

“There’s an argument to be made that games are perfect at getting at the systemic problems and challenges in the world,” says Ian Bogost, a professor at Georgia Tech.

He says games are really good at showing the complex underbelly of stories.

Take a game that he helped make called Oil God. In the game, the player controls an oil-rich region, waging wars and inciting coupes. The player learns that oil prices are contingent on all sorts of factors rarely mentioned in a story about the price of a gallon of gas.

The Sociology of Videogames

creating games to bring awareness to social issues for over a decade.  The game to create the biggest waves was arguably MTV’s “Darfur is Dying” released online in 2006, in which players took up the role of a family displaced by conflict in Darfur.

LITA games at the library

Level up your Library Instruction through Games

Ally Addison Schauer, Elaine Settergren, LITA 2015

Learning Objectives


● Understand how Twine and Camtasia Studio softwares can be used for Library Instruction games


● Understand game design process and strategies

Apple developer

World Usability Day

World Usability Day

World Usability Day (WUD) or Make Things Easier Day[1] occurs annually to promote the values of usability, usability engineering, user-centered design, universal usability, and every user’s responsibility to ask for things that work better.

Games in the Classroom

Some Struggles Teachers Face Using Games in the Classroom

the Joan Ganz Cooney Center found that 74 percent of K-8 teachers surveyed use digital games for instruction in some way and 55 percent use them weekly.

Confused About Ed Tech Tools? New Rating Site for Apps and Games

Video Games That Bring Civics Class to Life

MIT Education Arcade:

LGN Learning Games Network:


Active Learning Classrooms

Join us next Tuesday, November 10th from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM, for a special SIG Series webinar: Tales from the National Forum on Active Learning Classrooms

The WSU Learning Spaces Team attended the National Forum on Active Learning Classrooms at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities this summer and learned a lot. With topics ranging from picking whiteboards to better integrating classroom design into your campus strategic planning efforts, the conference was a treasure trove of good practices, pictures of cool new classrooms, links to useful information, and pro tips. Join us as we share what we learned at this amazing gathering. If you didn’t get a chance to go, this session will be a great opportunity to zoom in on the highlights. If you went, we would love to compare notes!

Ken Graetz, Tom Hill, Stephanie Stango, Dave Burman, and Eric Wright are all part of the Winona State University Learning Spaces Team and members of the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Services unit of Information Technology Services. They attended the National Forum as a team this summer and were able to cover almost all of the sessions. Each brings a unique perspective to the discussion, from under-the-hood classroom systems design and configuration to instructional design and pedagogical strategies.

Register for the webinar at Please forward this on to anyone on your campus who might be interested.

Link to the Virtual Room:

Or join by phone:

+1 646 568 7788 (US Toll) or +1 415 762 9988 (US Toll)

Meeting ID: 672 493 176


CCUMC Leadership in Media and Academic Technology.

EduCause learning space rating system.

McGill Principles for Designing of Teaching and Learning Spaces has rubric

most useful technology in an ALC appears to be the whiteboard.

Whiteboards are also very glitchy. Projecting my tablet or laptop is just as effective–with less glitches

evidence that students are reluctant to engage in active learning.

the U has done work, but the “Canadians have the process”

the support faculty gets from technicians: two week in the beginning of the semester in a new classroom.

what is the most important goal of your college education and therefore of this course: a. inquiring information b. learning how to sue information and knowledge in  anew situation c. developing skills to continue learning after college

  1. creativity
  2. computer skills
  3. GPA cutoff above 3.0
  4. problem solving skills
  5. teamwork skills
  6. verbal communication
  7. written communication skills  instructor will have students use in classes to identify problems engaging in a virtual field trip. student engagement

design thinking

wikispaces as GOogle docs, MS Word 16, work collaboratively

not group, but team. team work very important

take what we learned in ALCs to traditional large lecture halls

blending the formal with the informal (including outdoors)

connecting ALCs together across distance

thinking about gear (raised floors, smart kapp boards)