Archive of ‘learning’ category

blockchain in education

What is Blockchain

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/02/common-craft-explains-blockchain.html

What is Blockchain in Education

Andreia Inamorato Dos Santos from bcined

Digital Skills Gap Peer Learning Activity – Blockchain in Education – Usage Scenarios for HE In the European Higher Education Area from European Distance and E-Learning Network – EDEN

Blockchain for Education: A Study on Digital Accreditation of Personal and Academic Learning from Anthony Fisher Camilleri

Technology Innovation Loves Humanities: Open Education on the Blockchain from Hristian Daskalov

World's First Educational Blockchain Project Manifesto (2013) from Hristian Daskalov

Ad Kroft from bcined

+++++++++++
more blockchain in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain+education

best practices VR education

3 best practices from VR implementation across departments

BY ANDREW WOODBERRY  January 16th, 2018

Professors across many disciplines are embracing VR technology as an integral part of their learning tools

3 best practices from VR implementation across departments

. Link VR content to course outcomes. If you want to VR to succeed in your college classroom, you have to look at how 360-degree audio and video adds value. The forensic-science department, for example, is trying to get a close approximation of a crime scene so that students can acclimate to the job environment and take a real-world approach to investigations. Adding VR without adding value will not be effective.
2. Do a proof-of-concept app first. The history reenactment app was a great starting point, as it was a simple-to-film, single-location shoot that didn’t require much editing. You want to start simple to get an early win. They learned valuable lessons during that shoot, such as best camera placement to minimize distractions.

3. Get buy-in at the highest levels. Marketing students in the capstone project are presenting the final apps to the President, Provost, and other administration officials. Once you get buy-in at an administrative level, it’s easier to secure funding for more equipment and more promotion of your work to other departments.

+++++++++++
more on VR in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education

Big Tech in schools

Former Google Design Ethicist: Relying on Big Tech in Schools Is a ‘Race to the Bottom’

By Jenny Abamu     Feb 7, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-02-07-former-google-design-ethicist-relying-on-big-tech-in-schools-is-a-race-to-the-bottom

Common Sense Media recently partnered with the Center for Humane Technology, which supports the development of ethical technological tools, to lay out a fierce call for regulation and awareness about the health issues surrounding tech addiction.

Tristan Harris, a former ethicist at Google who founded the Center for Humane Technology

To support educators making such decisions, Common Sense Media is taking their “Truth about Tech” campaign to schools through an upgraded version of their current Digital Citizenship curriculum. The new updates will include more information on subjects such as:

  • Creating a healthy media balance and digital wellness;
  • Concerns about the rise of hate speech in schools, that go beyond talking about cyberbullying; and
  • Fake news, media literacy and curating your own content

What Does ‘Tech Addiction’ Mean?

In a recent NPR report, writer Anya Kamenetz, notes that clinicians are debating whether technology overuse is best categorized as a bad habit, a symptom of other mental struggles (such as depression or anxiety) or as an addiction.

Dr. Jenny Radesky, a developmental-behavioral pediatrician at the American Academy of Pediatrics, notes that though she’s seen solid evidence linking heavy media usage to problems with sleep and obesity, she hesitated to call the usage “addiction.”

Dr. Robert Lustig, an endocrinologist who studies hormones at the University of Southern California disagreed, noting that parents have to see the overuse of technology as an addiction.

UNICEF cryptocurrency

Unicef recruits gamers to mine Ethereum in aid of Syrian children

Cryptocurrency scheme is part of wider UN effort to revolutionise aid with blockchain technology, increasing financial transparency

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/feb/06/unicef-recruits-gamers-mine-ethereum-aid-syrian-children

The UN’s children’s agency, Unicef, has launched a futuristic pilot project to utilise the cryptocurrency Ethereum to raise money for Syrian children.

the “blockchain” technology associated with the cryptocurrency – the world’s second largest after the controversial Bitcoin – to revolutionise not only how aid organisations raise money but also to increase transparency in their financial transactions.

Blockchain – which emerged as one of the underpinnings of Bitcoin – is a shared record of transactions maintained by a network of computers. It has become a key technology because of its ability to record and keep track of assets or transactions with no need for middlemen.

With a valuation of some $88bn (£62bn), Ethereum – which launched in 2015 – has an equivalent market value to Starbucks, according to Forbes magazine

The World Food Programme (WFP) has used Ethereum to deliver $1.4m in food vouchers, via the use of iris recognition scanners in camp supermarkets, to around 10,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan,

 

++++++++++
more on cryptocurrency in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cryptocurrency

cryptocurrency Russia

Russia’s Sberbank plans cryptocurrency exchange in Switzerland

PUBLISHED 03:43 FEBRUARY 6, 2018

Moscow appears to have moved quickly into the market of cryptocurrencies and cryptography. Gref earlier warned that companies including Blockchain and Bitcoin should not be banned or hindered in their operations.

Russia’s Finance Ministry legalised cryptocurrency trading on January 25 with the Digital Assets Regulation Bill, despite vocal objections from the country’s Central Bank. The bill defined cryptocurrencies and tokens as digital financial assets that are not legal tender in Russia. The Central Bank, however, argued that digital currency trading rules should only be applied to tokens that would attract financial investments.

+++++++++++
https://news.bitcoin.com/sberbank-bypass-russian-regulations-trade-cryptocurencies-overseas/

https://www.reuters.com/article/russia-sberbank-cryptocurrencies/sberbank-plans-to-trade-cryptocurrencies-outside-russia-idUSL8N1PP5SL

https://www.crypto-economy.net/ceo-of-sberbank-disagree-with-a-cryptocurrency-ban

+++++++++++

Bitcoin price falls below $6,000 as banker signals crackdown

BIS head says cryptocurrency is a ‘Ponzi scheme’ that poses a threat to financial stability
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/feb/06/bitcoin-price-crackdown-bis-cryptocurrency

+++++++++++
more on cryptocurrency in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cryptocurrency

Library Counter project

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/06/library-counter-project/
short link: http://bit.ly/libcount

Library counters project from Plamen Miltenoff

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/05/key-performance-indicator-toolkit/comment-page-1/#comment-843

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Mark Sandford <msandford@colgate.edu>
Reply-To: lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Monday, February 5, 2018 at 7:32 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Using Raspberry Pi(s) w/ Sensors to Obtain Counts on Occupancy in a Library Space

Berika,

We’re currently experimenting/piloting with RPis, the RPi camera module, and this code:

https://github.com/WatershedArts/Footfall

It’s working, generally, but it does require a good bit of config tweaking to get it to accurately count. It also needs (I’ve discovered) a certain amount of distance between the door and the camera. We have very low ceilings at our doorways and a single person can span the entire frame which appears to confuse the software. All that being said, it’s very much worth looking into.

Analytics out of the box aren’t great. The only built in report is only the current day’s numbers, but it’s pretty easy to export data. We have Libinsight from Springshare and I’m working on pumping that data into their system. It is tricky because the system basically records two things: a timestamp, and a positive or negative integer depending on whether or not the traffic was going in or out. By default, no generic analytics system seems to understand that well enough to display it the way I’d like, so I may have to create some custom reports using d3.js or similar.

I’m using the Pi 2 and standard camera module from Adafruit. I’d be happy to answer questions.

——-

Mark Sandford  Systems Librarian Assistant Professor in the Libraries Colgate University Libraries

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 1:23 PM, <berika.williams@tufts.edu> wrote:

Hi all,

We are trying to automate counting the number of people entering and leaving a

specific floor of our library. (The library is located in a multi-use

building.)

We’ve looked at the awesome “Measure the Future” code but we need analytics

more akin to a gate count versus tracking movement of people utilizing the

space.

Have any of you used raspberry pis or other technologies to do this type of

tracking?

If so, would you be willing to share your hardware/software setup with us and

also what type of data/analytics you’re getting back from the system?

Thank you,

Berika

——————

Berika Williams

Research and Instruction

Emerging Technologies and Web Librarian

Hirsh Health Sciences Library/ Tufts University

145 Harrison Ave, Boston MA 02111

http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu

  1. 617 636-2454

brain research distance ed

The Implications of Brain Research for Distance Education

Katrina A. Meyer
Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership
University of North Dakota
katrina_meyer@und.nodak.edu

posted on FB in 2013 https://www.facebook.com/plamen.miltenoff/posts/10100455869591041

The brain is actually three brains: the ancient reptilian brain, the limbic brain, and the cortical brain. This article will focus on the limbic brain, because it may be most important to successfully using interactive video or web-based video. The limbic brain monitors the external world and the internal body, taking in information through the senses as well as body temperature and blood pressure, among others. It is the limbic brain that generates and interprets facial expressions and handles emotions, while the cortical brain handles symbolic activities such as language as well as action and strategizing. The two interact when an emotion is sent from the limbic to the cortical brain and generates a conscious thought; in response to a feeling of fear (limbic), you ask, “what should I do?” (cortical).

The importance of direct eye contact and deciphering body language is also important for sending and picking up clues about social context.

The loss of social cues is important because it may affect the quality of the content of the presentation (by not allowing timely feedback or questions) but also because students may feel less engaged and become frustrated with the interaction, and subsequently lower their assessment of the class and the instructor (Reeves & Nass, 1996). Fortunately, faculty can provide such social cues verbally, once they are aware of the importance of helping students use these new media.

Attachment theory also supports the importance of physical and emotional connections.

As many a struggling teacher knows, students are often impervious to learning new concepts. They may replay the new information for a test, but after time passes, they revert to the earlier (and likely wrong) information. This is referred to as the “power of mental models.” As explained in Marchese (2000), when we view a tree, it is not as if we see the tree in our head, as in photography.

The coping strategies of the two hemispheres are fundamentally different. The left hemisphere’s job is to create a belief system or model and to fold new experiences into that belief system. If confronted with some new information that doesn’t fit the model, it relies on Freudian defense mechanisms to deny, repress or confabulate – anything to preserve the status quo. The right hemisphere’s strategy is to play “Devil’s Advocate,” to question the status quo and look for global inconsistencies. When the anomalous information reaches a certain threshold, the right hemisphere decides that it is time to force a complete revision of the entire model and start from scratch (Ramachandran & Blakeslee, 1998, p. 136).

While much hemispheric-based research has been repudiated as an oversimplification (Gackenbach, 1999), the above description of how new information eventually overwhelms an old world view may be the result of multiple brain functions – some of which work to preserve our models and others to alter – that help us both maintain and change as needed.

Self-talk is the “the root of empathy, understanding, cooperation, and rules that allow us to be successful social beings. Any sense of moral behavior requires thought before action” (Ratey, 2001, p. 255).

Healy (1999) argues that based on what we know about brain development in children, new computer media may be responsible for developing brains that are largely different from the brains of adults. This is because “many brain connections have become specialized for . . . media” (p. 133); in this view, a brain formed by language and reading is different from a brain formed by hypermedia. Different media lead to different synaptic connections being laid down and reinforced, creating different brains in youngsters raised on fast-paced, visually-stimulating computer applications and video games. “Newer technologies emphasize rapid processing of visual symbols . . . and deemphasize traditional verbal learning . . . and the linear, analytic thought process . . . [making it] more difficult to deal with abstract verbal reasoning” (Healy, 1999, p. 142).

 

++++++++++++++++
more on distance ed in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=distance+education

Cymatic frequences

CYMATICS – Science Vs. Music – Nigel Stanford

CYMATICS – Science Vs. MusicThis video was a labor of love. Hope you like it!Watch my new video Automatica here:http://NigelStanford.com/f/fcy-/Automatica

Posted by Nigel Stanford on Tuesday, September 26, 2017

++++++++++
more videos in this IMS blog

carburator

1 2 3 4 116