InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'Project Based Learning' Category

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning | Four Smart Ways to Use Cell Phones in Class. Backchanneling.

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 7th January 2014

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning. Backchanneling.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/01/how-byod-programs-can-fuel-inquiry-learning/

creating a learner profile, a set of criteria the school district wanted students to learn while in school. That profile includes: seek knowledge and understanding; think critically and solve problems; listen, communicate, and interact effectively; exhibit strong personal qualities; and engage and compete in a global environment. The profile helps guide all approaches to learning in the district.

Kids already know how to use their devices, but they don’t know how to learn with their devices,” Clark said in an edWeb webinar. It’s the teacher’s role to help them discover how to connect to content, one another and learning with a device that they may have only used for texting and Facebook previously. “It’s about the kids being empowered in the classroom to make decisions about the ways that they are learning,”

Four Smart Ways to Use Cell Phones in Class

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/11/four-smart-ways-to-use-cell-phones-in-class/

IN-CLASS POLLING/QUIZZING.

IN-CLASS BACK-CHANNELINGBackchanneling refers to the use of networks & social media to maintain an online, real-time conversation alongside spoken remarks.

IN-CLASS READINGS AND HANDOUTS. Smartphones can also be used productively in the classroom as eReaders for books and handouts. You can place all student handouts into DropBox folders (see “Dropbox A Multi-Tool for Educators”).

ORGANIZING RESEARCH. 

Using Google Docs for backchanneling with students:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/04/this-is-how-to-use-google-docs-to.html

10 ways to employ backchanneling in  classroom instruction.

  1. Poll students on a particular classroom event or on a decision regarding their learning
  2. Crowdsource feedback on learning activities and use this input to inform your future instructional strategies.
  3. Backchanneling empowers students voice and make them feel they are real participants in the knowledge building taking place in the class.
  4. Conduct informat assessments .
  5. Assess students prior knowledge about a given topic.
  6. Brainstorm ideas for a writing project.
  7. Encourage students to ask questions about anything they did not understand.
  8. Hold synchronous discussions of video content shared in class
  9. Organize real time discussions in class.
  10. Backchanneling is a good way to engage introverts and shy students in classroom conversations.

Posted in information literacy, learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, Project Based Learning, student-centered learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

What is the difference between education and training?

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 5th January 2014

per LinkedIn discussion: http://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=5822757351727316994&gid=2038260&goback=%2Enmp_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1#commentID_null

What is the difference between education and training?

☆☆☆☆☆ Industrial Automation Training – Industrial Training software to Maintenance, Engineering, Manufacturing.Top Contributor

Schools and companies commonly use the word “Training” when actually all they are delivering is scholastic education. Our company clearly distinguishes between the two which increases our effectiveness and to differentiate what we deliver to customers (what most call students) from others like colleges. I thought it would be interesting to get this group’s members opinion on the difference between “Training” and “Education”, and to get group members thinking about it.

ray schroederray schroeder

Director of the UPCEA Center for Online Leadership and Strategy – and – UIS Associate Vice Chancellor of Online Learning

This is one of those questions, the answers to which will be easy to pick apart. But, I will venture a beginning:

Training is task-oriented. It is circumscribed by circumstances such as location, goal, job, career. Training’s intent is to master a task, method or approach.

Education is a broader activity that spans locations, goals, careers. Education’s intent is life guiding, life changing and lasting.

Training can have lifelong import. But, the focus is on a specific task or goal.

Education often includes task-learning.

Enough. A more important task now demands my attention – breakfast – I have been trained well for this lifelong task.

-ray

 

Rahat iqbal

Executive Director at SCI-EDUCATION SYSTEM,LONDON UK

Training direct develop skills for different profession but education reflects research and update knowledge.

Jolly Holden Jolly Holden

Faculty at American InterContinental University

When asked the difference between education and training, a 4-star general replied…do you want your daughter to have sex training or sex education? Nearly everyone in the audience (1,000+) fell out of there seats. After the laughter subsided, the general went on to reply “fundamentally, education is focused on developing critical thinking skills (know why) that help enable creative solutions, whereas training is about developing specific skill sets (know how) for consistently reliable results.” That said, while there is a large grey area between training and education, per se, when does education stop and training begin, the outcome of both is learning. As a former Air Force flight instructor, I told my students they are educated in the aerodynamics of flight, but trained on how to fly.

Joy Scott Joy Scott

Workplace Performance Improvement, Training, Instructional Design, Independent Writer

I just finished reading The Eden Conspiracy: Educating for Accomplished Citizenship by Joe Harless (1998). He explains (p. 157): “Training and education are often differentiated by saying education is to provide knowledge for unpredictable circumstances; training is for predictable circumstances.”

He also states education is provided in school, (K-college) and training is provided after school (knowledge and skills provided on-the-job). Since Harless published this book, the delivery options of education and training has changed, thanks to the Internet. Education and training can occur anywhere, and without proper context, someone can mix the labels and confuse being trained for a specific task with being educated about something they can use to determine if they should use the task they’ve been trained on.

Harless, J. (1998). The Eden Conspiracy: Educating for Accomplished Citizenship . Wheaton, IL: Guild V Publications.

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, online learning, pedagogy, Project Based Learning, teaching | No Comments »

bibliography list of peer-reviewed literature on “flipped classroom”

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 28th October 2013

list of peer reviewed literature on “flipped classroom”

Findlay-Thompson, S., & Mombourquette, P. (2013). EVALUATION OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS COURSE. Global Conference On Business & Finance Proceedings, 8(2), 138-145.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=buh&AN=89496806

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=keh&AN=88785048

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology Research & Development, 61(4), 563-580. doi:10.1007/s11423-013-9305-6
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=keh&AN=88785048

Missildine, K., Fountain, R., Summers, L., & Gosselin, K. (2013). Flipping the Classroom to Improve Student Performance and Satisfaction. Journal Of Nursing Education, 52(10), 597-599. doi:10.3928/01484834-20130919-03
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=rzh&AN=2012318677

Butt, A. (2014). STUDENT VIEWS ON THE USE OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM APPROACH: EVIDENCE FROM AUSTRALIA. Business Education & Accreditation, 6(1), 33-43.

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=buh&AN=90567007

Strayer, J. F. (2012). How Learning in an Inverted Classroom Influences Cooperation, Innovation and Task Orientation. Learning Environments Research, 15(2), 171-193.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=eric&AN=EJ977852

Critz, C. M., & Knight, D. (2013). Using the Flipped Classroom in Graduate Nursing Education. Nurse Educator, 38(5), 210-213. doi:10.1097/NNE.0b013e3182a0e56a
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=rzh&AN=2012296027

Herreid, C., & Schiller, N. A. (2013). Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom. Journal Of College Science Teaching, 42(5), 62-66.

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=keh&AN=86988365

Jottings by Saquarrah. (2013). Medical Teacher, 35(6), 532-533.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=89131643

search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=tfh&AN=85672747

Brunsell, E., & Horejsi, M. (2013). Science 2.0. Science Teacher, 80(2), 8.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=sch&AN=85127911

 

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, flipped classrooms, hybrid learning, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, podcasting, Project Based Learning | 1 Comment »