Archive of ‘Project Based Learning’ category

Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

Book Announcement: Implementing Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

New book: Implementing Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

by Steve McCarty, Hiroyuki Obari, and Takeshi Sato

Publisher: Springer Singapore / SpringerBriefs in Education (107 pages)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction: Contextualizing Mobile Language Learning in Japan

Chapter 2 Mobile Language Learning Pedagogy: A Sociocultural Perspective

Chapter 3 Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology Case Study:

Smartphone App LINE for EFL Peer Learning

Chapter 4 Osaka Jogakuin University Case Study:

Mobilizing the EFL Curriculum and Campus Infrastructure with iPods and iPads

Chapter 5 Aoyama Gakuin University Case Study:

Blended Learning and Flipped Classrooms utilizing Mobile Devices

Chapter 6 Conclusion: Implementing Language Learning in a Mobile-Oriented Society


This book explores theoretical and practical aspects of implementing mobile language learning in university classrooms for English as a Foreign Language in Japan. The technologies utilized, such as smartphones, iPads, and wi-fi, integrate students’ hand-held devices into the campus network infrastructure. The pedagogical aims of ubiquitous mobile learning further incorporate social media, blended learning, and flipped classroom approaches into the curriculum. Chapter 1 defines mobile language learning within dimensions of e-learning and technology-assisted language learning, prior to tracing the development of mobile learning in Japan. Chapter 2 documents the sociocultural theory underpinning the authors’ humanistic approach to implementation of mobile technologies. The sociocultural pedagogy represents a global consensus of leading educators that also recognizes the agency of Asian learners and brings out their capability for autonomous learning. Case studies of universities, large and small, public and private, are organized similarly in Chapters 3 to 5. Institutional/pedagogical and technological context sections are followed by detailed content on the implementation of initiatives, assessment of effectiveness, and recommendations for other institutions. Distinct from a collection of papers, this monograph tells a story in brief book length about theorizing and realizing mobile language learning, describing pioneering and original initiatives of importance to practitioners in other educational contexts.


Steve McCarty lectures for Kansai University, Osaka Jogakuin University, KIC Graduate School of IT, and the government agency JICA.

Hiroyuki Obari, PhD in Computer Science, is a Professor at the Aoyama Gakuin University College of Economics in Tokyo.

Takeshi Sato is an Associate Professor at the Division of Language and Culture Studies, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.

Ordering information from Springer

Paperback (ISBN: 978-981-10-2449-8):

eBook (ISBN: 978-981-10-2451-1) or individual chapters:



more on mobile technologies in this IMS blog

educational game on IT ‐ security

IP‐Please, design and development of an educational game on IT‐security
Peter Mozelius, Charlotte Lesley and Ola Olsson
Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden
Game‐based learning is a research field with rich discussions on the use of games in educational contexts. Many of the educational games that exist today focus on subjects such
as Language learning, Mathematics and History, and fewer on subjects in Computer Science
and IT‐security. Dissemination of information about IT‐security is important in today’s digital
society not at least in the industry. As an example many firewalls today are misconfigured
leading to decreased security at the same time as it is hard to motivate students or employees to read long detailed and tedious PDF‐files with security information. Might
things like firewall configuration instead be learnt by an educational game and how to design
a learning game that could be used in university courses on IT‐security?


more on gaming and gamification in this blog:

blockchain credentialing

AAEEBL (The Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based learning) starts the Baston Blog

Blockchain Credentialing: What Impact Will it Have?
Posted By Trent Batson Ph. D.

blockchain credentialing, big news since the MIT Media Lab offered an open source means of credentialing using blockchain technology (the technology behind bitcoin).

Blockchain credentialing makes verification of credentials much simpler and less time consuming, according to the articles I’ve collected below.  Even IBM has entered the arena.

As with badges, we in the eportfolio world need to be aware of the trend toward blockchain credentialing.  I’ve sorted through the links below so I could select those I thought would be most useful for you. — the Phil Long interview

more on badges in this blog

digital portfolio

MindTap Offers Users Free Access to Digital Portfolio Tool

By Sri Ravipati 08/03/16

MindTap, an online learning platform from Cengage Learning, will be able to build digital portfolios of their work for free and keep them for life.

mobile app version is available on the Apple Store and Google Play.


more on e-portfolio in this IMS blog:

more on badges

Badging: Not Quite the Next Big Thing

While badging and digital credentialing are gaining acceptance in the business world and, to some extent, higher education, K-12 educators — and even students — are slower to see the value.

By Michael Hart 07/20/16

That’s when the MacArthur Foundation highlighted the winning projects of its Badges for Lifelong Learning competition at the Digital Media and Learning Conference in Chicago. The competition, co-sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Mozilla Foundation, had attracted nearly 100 competitors a year earlier. The winners shared $2 million worth of development grants.

Evidence of Lifelong Learning

A digital badge or credential is a validation, via technology, that a person has earned an accomplishment, learned a skill or gained command of specific content. Typically, it is an interactive image posted on a web page and connected to a certain body of information that communicates the badge earner’s competency.

Credly is a company that offers off-the-shelf credentialing and badging for organizations, companies and educational institutions. One of its projects, BadgeStack, which has since been renamed BadgeOS, was a winner in the 2013 MacArthur competition. Virtually any individual or organization can use its platform to determine criteria for digital credentials and then award them, often taking advantage of an open-source tool like WordPress. The credential recipient can then use the BadgeOS platform to manage the use of the credential, choosing to display badges on social media profiles or uploading achievements to a digital resume, for instance.

Finkelstein and others see, with the persistently growing interest in competency-based education (CBE), that badging is a way to assess and document competency.

Colorado Education Initiative, (see webinar report in this IMS blog

There are obstacles, though, to universal acceptance of digital credentialing.
For one, not every community, company or organization sees a badge as something of value.

When a player earns points for his or her success in a game, those points have no value outside of the environment in which the game is played. For points, badges, credentials — however you want to define them — to be perceived as evidence of competency, they have to have portability and be viewed with value outside of their own environment.



More on badges in this IMS blog:

Inquiry-Based Classroom

10 Tips For Launching An Inquiry-Based Classroom

1. Don’t teach the content standards; help kids find their own path towards the information they need to know.

2. Don’t tell students what they should know; create the structure for them to experience it on their own.

3. Use class time to make connections between pieces of information.

4. Many kids struggle with reading, so hook them with the non-written word.

5. Stop giving struggling kids the most boring version of the work to repeat over and over again.

6. Surprise students.

7. The traditional model of imparting knowledge isn’t working very well, so don’t be afraid to try out inquiry.

8. Find the “bend” in the outcomes and abandon the prescriptive path.

9. Indulge interesting student questions even if it doesn’t fit the pacing guide.

10. Approach the practice of teaching with inquiry and use that meta-practice to improve.

fit game education

The Fit Children of Seinäjoen

My note: the Spiegel article is about obesity and fitness, but I see if very congruent with gamification

But what are the Finns doing right? The answer is multifaceted and likely has something to do with the Finnish mentality, which tends to take an uncomplicated, pragmatic approach to problems.


More on the Finland phenomenon in this IMS blog:

Immersive Education

Immersive Italy and 6th European Immersive Education Summit Host and Dates Announced

The Immersive Education Initiative today announced that Università degli Studi di Padova (the University of Padua) is the official host of the 6th European Immersive Education Summit (EiED 2016). The prestigious academic and technical conference will run in parallel with the inaugural IMMERSIVE ITALY “general public” conference from June 21 through June 23.

More on immersive practices in this IMS blog:

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