Archive of ‘video’ category

video captions benefit

Report: Video Captions Benefit Virtually All Students

By Leila Meyer 11/02/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/02/report-video-captions-benefit-virtually-all-students.aspx

The Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit conducted the national study in collaboration with 3Play Media. The researchers surveyed 2,124 students across 15 public and private universities throughout the United States. Of all respondents, 19 percent reported hearing difficulties, and 37 reported vision difficulties. However, only 13 percent had registered with an office of disability services, and less than 12 percent reported they require academic accommodations.

The study revealed that students find closed captions and video transcripts helpful, whether the student is deaf or hard of hearing or not.

Key findings from the study:

  • Almost 100 percent of survey respondents had at least one course — either face-to-face or online — that included some video content;
  • 75 percent of students use captions as a learning aid in face-to-face and online classrooms;
  • 98.6 percent of students who use captions say they are helpful;
  • 71 percent of students without hearing difficulties use captions at least some of the time;
  • Students reference video transcripts as a learning aid 85 percent of the time;
  • 66 percent of English-as-a-second-language (ESL) students find captions extremely or very helpful;
  • 61 percent of students with learning disabilities find captions helpful;
  • More than one quarter of students were unsure about the availability of closed captions for video content in their course; and
  • Almost one-in-five students were unsure about the availability of video transcripts for their course.

Further details about the study and a link to the full report can be found on 3Play Media’s site.

Best Apps Games and Sites of the Last Year

Mobile: Best Apps, Games and Sites of the Last Year

https://thejournal.com/Articles/2016/01/05/Best-AppsGames-and-Sites-of-the-Last-Year.aspx

GameMaker: Studio
Grades: 5–12
Pricing: Free, paid
Concepts: Digital creation, programming and coding, game design

GameMaker: Studio is a robust game-making tool that appeals to both entry-level novices and game-development pros alike.

The Orchestra
Grades: 6–12
Pricing: $13.99
Concepts: Music theory, memorization, listening, part-whole relationships

The Orchestra is an interactive iPad app for exploring classical music, the orchestra and orchestral instruments.

WonderBox
Grades: 2–8
Pricing: Free
Concepts: Design, geography, curiosity, imagination, making new creations

As its name suggests, WonderBox is an app that piques kids’ natural curiosity through video, drawing, taking pictures, messaging with family and friends and engaging in multistep challenges.

A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy Online
Grades: 9–12
Pricing: Free to try, paid
Concepts: Anatomy, biology, memorization, part-whole relationships

A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy Online is a 3D visualization and curriculum-development tool all about the human body. Teachers can select and create assignments that allow students to manipulate 3D images of the human body.

Construct 2
Grades: 7–12
Pricing: Free, paid
Concepts: Digital creation, programming and coding, game design

Construct 2 is a Web-based 2D game-creation tool for students and teachers who want to get into game design without the need to know programming languages.

Fruity Fractions
Grades: 1–3
Pricing: $2.99
Concepts: Fractions, part-whole relationships

Set in a tropical jungle full of brightly colored fruit and animated birds, Fruity Fractions teaches fractions concepts to kids in first through third grades.

virtual reality

Three really real questions about the future of virtual reality

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jan/07/virtual-reality-future-oculus-rift-vr

  1. How mainstream is this technology really going to be?Facebook sees VR as the next big computing platform, but that will depend on it becoming a truly mainstream device
  2. Will VR really be about more than gamesSome of the educational projects already unveiled – the British Museum’s use of VR to transport visitors back to the bronze age; Irish startup VR Education’s VR app based on the Apollo 11 moon landing; David Attenborough’s work with a special VR exhibit at London’s Natural History Museum; and NASA’s PlayStation VR demo of how VR could help its operators practise using robotic arms on the International Space Station – are among the more convincing arguments for modern VR being about more than just games or gimmicks.
  3. Can our bodies and minds really cope with VR?

More on Oculus in this IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=oculus&submit=Search

VR is the future and it’s officially here

http://www.businessinsider.com/vr-is-the-future-2016-1

Breakout Sessions for Large Online Video Classes

New Technology Allows Breakout Sessions for Large Online Video Classes

Zoom Breakout Rooms will allow instructors in video classes as large as 200 students to break into as many as 50 smaller groups. By Michael Hart 12/01/15

Zoom https://zoom.us/

mobile video is growing

Mobile video advertising is growing three times as fast as spending on desktop video

 http://www.businessinsider.com/mobile-video-drives-ad-growth-2015-5#ixzz3jixiqowN
YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitch, BuzzFeed, and Snapchat videos are increasingly keeping audiences glued to their small screens, opening up new greenfield opportunities in advertising.

Anniversary of Allies march in Germany

The Day of the Century: how Germans experienced World War II

http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/world-war-ii-in-cologne-delusion-a-1032115.html
(please go to the site for a full show)

 

http://twistedsifter.com/videos/remarkable-hd-footage-of-berlin-from-july-1945/

 

AI

The Deep Mind of Dennis Hassabis

In the race to recruit the best AI talent, Google scored a coup by getting the team led by a former video game guru and chess prodigy

https://medium.com/backchannel/the-deep-mind-of-demis-hassabis-156112890d8a

the only path to developing really powerful AI would be to use this unstructured information. It’s also called unsupervised learning— you just give it data and it learns by itself what to do with it, what the structure is, what the insights are.

One of the people you work with at Google is Geoff Hinton, a pioneer of neural networks. Has his work been crucial to yours?

Sure. He had this big paper in 2006 that rejuvenated this whole area. And he introduced this idea of deep neural networks—Deep Learning. The other big thing that we have here is reinforcement learning, which we think is equally important. A lot of what Deep Mind has done so far is combining those two promising areas of research together in a really fundamental way. And that’s resulted in the Atari game player, which really is the first demonstration of an agent that goes from pixels to action, as we call it.

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