Archive of ‘Library and information science’ category

Reading Digesting Scholarly Research

ELI Webinar | Reading & Digesting Scholarly Research: Tips to Save Time While Increasing Understanding

Tuesday, February 26 | 1:00p.m. – 2:00p.m. ET | Online

Reading and digesting scholarly research can be challenging when new journal issues, reports, and books are being released every day. Join Katie Linder, director of research for Oregon State University Ecampus, to learn some tips that will help you find scholarly research that’s applicable to your work, read that research more efficiently, evaluate the quality of scholarly research, and decide on the applicability of the research you’re reading to your day-to-day work. You’ll also have the opportunity to ask any questions you might have about reading and digesting scholarly research.

Outcomes

  • Find the scholarly research that is of most importance to your work
  • Read scholarly research efficiently
  • Evaluate the quality of scholarly research
  • Decide when and how to apply scholarly research results in your work

Katie Linder Research Director, Ecampus Oregon State University https://members.educause.edu/kathryn-linder

Russia disconnect Internet

Russia Is Considering An Experiment To Disconnect From The Internet

February 11, 20194:50 PM ET  SASHA INGBER

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/11/693538900/russia-is-considering-an-experiment-to-disconnect-from-the-internet

Russia is considering a plan to temporarily disconnect from the Internet as a way to gauge how the country’s cyberdefenses would fare in the face of foreign aggression, according to Russian media.

It was introduced after the White House published its 2018 National Security Strategy, which attributed cyberattacks on the United States to Russia, China, Iran and North Korea.

Russia’s Communications Ministry also simulated a switching-off exercise of global Internet services in 2014, according to Russian outlet RT.

Russia’s State Duma will meet Tuesday to consider the bill, according to RIA Novosti.

Roskomnadzor has also exerted pressure on Google to remove certain sites on Russian searches.

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told Congress last month that Russia, as well as other foreign actors, will increasingly use cyber operations to “threaten both minds and machines in an expanding number of ways—to steal information, to influence our citizens, or to disrupt critical infrastructure.”

My note: In the past, the US actions prompted other countries to consider the same:
Germanty – http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/privacy-and-surveillance-obama-advisor-john-podesta-every-country-has-a-history-of-going-over-the-line/

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

AI in the classroom

How Much Artificial Intelligence Should There Be in the Classroom?

By Betsy Corcoran and Jeffrey R. Young     Jan 23, 2019

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-23-how-much-artificial-intelligence-should-there-be-in-the-classroom

We can build robot teachers, or even robot teaching assistants. But should we?

the Chinese government has declared a national goal of surpassing the U.S. in AI technology by the year 2030, so there is almost a Sputnik-like push for the tech going on right now in China. At the same time, China is also facing a shortage of qualified teachers in many rural areas, and there’s a huge demand for high-quality language teachers and tutors throughout the country.

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more on AI in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=artificial+intelligence

K-12 And Higher Education Converged?

K-12 And Higher Education Are Considered Separate Systems. What If They Converged?

By Jeffrey R. Young     Sep 8, 2017

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-09-08-k-12-and-higher-education-are-considered-separate-systems-what-if-they-converged

In “The Convergence of K-12 and Higher Education: Policies and Programs in a Changing Era,” two education professors point out potential benefits of taking a more holistic view to American education

interview with Christopher Loss, one of the editors.

What role does technology play in some of the convergences that occur or are happening?

There’s a great essay in the collection by June Ahn, which deals with the idea of technology as a key mediating source and mechanism for the creation of various kinds of convergences between and among different sectors (my note: K12 and higher ed).

Cyberlearning Community Report: The State of Cyberlearning and the Future of Learning With Technology http://circlcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/CyberlearningCommunityReport2017.pdf (Oct, 2017)

Americans like to see themselves as among the best in the world in education. But lately, the education leaders have been looking abroad for ideas, I think. What can we learn from countries that do have closer links between K-12 and higher ed?

Genrefication School Libraries Like Bookstores

How Genrefication Makes School Libraries More Like Bookstores

Gail Cornwall Jul 22, 2018 https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/51336/how-genrefication-makes-school-libraries-more-like-bookstores

Under the Dewey Decimal System that revolutionized and standardized book shelving starting in 1876, nonfiction essentially already gets the genrefication treatment with, for example, Music located in the 780s and Paleontology in the 560s. Yet most fiction is shelved in one big clump alphabetized by author’s last name.

Many librarians say the “search hurdle” imposed by Dewey classification (a system originally designed for adults) significantly reduces the odds of a child finding something new they’re likely to enjoy. In a genrefied library, on the other hand, a young reader standing near a favorite book need only stick out a hand to find more like it. (It’s a bit like the analog version of Amazon’s recommendation feature: “Customers who bought this item also bought”)

The Dewey-loyal also oppose genrefication in principle for, interestingly enough, the same reason others support it: self-sufficiency. Sure, they argue, kids might be better able to find a book independently in their school library, but what happens when they go to the public one? When they get to high school?

The debate has led to compromise positions. Some leave books for older students in the Dewey arrangement while genrefying for younger ones. Other librarians rearrange middle readers and young adult books but leave picture books shelved by author since it can be unclear how to categorize a story about a duck driving a tractor.

learn blockchain by building one

Learn Blockchains by Building One

The fastest way to learn how Blockchains work is to build one

Daniel van Flymen  Sept 24, 2017

https://hackernoon.com/learn-blockchains-by-building-one-117428612f46

Remember that a blockchain is an immutable, sequential chain of records called Blocks. They can contain transactions, files or any data you like, really. But the important thing is that they’re chained together using hashes.

If you aren’t sure what a hash is, here’s an explanation.

reading and writing some basic Python, as well as have some understanding of how HTTP requests work, since we’ll be talking to our Blockchain over HTTP.

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

Policy for Artificial Intelligence

Law is Code: Making Policy for Artificial Intelligence

Jules Polonetsky and Omer Tene January 16, 2019

https://www.ourworld.co/law-is-code-making-policy-for-artificial-intelligence/

Twenty years have passed since renowned Harvard Professor Larry Lessig coined the phrase “Code is Law”, suggesting that in the digital age, computer code regulates behavior much like legislative code traditionally did.  These days, the computer code that powers artificial intelligence (AI) is a salient example of Lessig’s statement.

  • Good AI requires sound data.  One of the principles,  some would say the organizing principle, of privacy and data protection frameworks is data minimization.  Data protection laws require organizations to limit data collection to the extent strictly necessary and retain data only so long as it is needed for its stated goal. 
  • Preventing discrimination – intentional or not.
    When is a distinction between groups permissible or even merited and when is it untoward?  How should organizations address historically entrenched inequalities that are embedded in data?  New mathematical theories such as “fairness through awareness” enable sophisticated modeling to guarantee statistical parity between groups.
  • Assuring explainability – technological due process.  In privacy and freedom of information frameworks alike, transparency has traditionally been a bulwark against unfairness and discrimination.  As Justice Brandeis once wrote, “Sunlight is the best of disinfectants.”
  • Deep learning means that iterative computer programs derive conclusions for reasons that may not be evident even after forensic inquiry. 

Yet even with code as law and a rising need for law in code, policymakers do not need to become mathematicians, engineers and coders.  Instead, institutions must develop and enhance their technical toolbox by hiring experts and consulting with top academics, industry researchers and civil society voices.  Responsible AI requires access to not only lawyers, ethicists and philosophers but also to technical leaders and subject matter experts to ensure an appropriate balance between economic and scientific benefits to society on the one hand and individual rights and freedoms on the other hand.

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more on AI in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=artificial+intelligence

identity political correctness

‘Identity is a pain in the arse’: Zadie Smith on political correctness

At Hay Cartagena festival author questions role of social media in policing personal development

 Sat 2 Feb 2019 

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/feb/02/zadie-smith-political-correctness-hay-cartagena

The writer Zadie Smith laid into identity politics in a headline session at the 14th Hay Cartagena festival, insisting novelists had not only a right, but a duty to be free.

She conceded that the assertion of a collective identity was sometimes necessary “to demand rights”, but cited the dismay of her husband – the poet and novelist Nick Laird – at finding himself increasingly categorised. “He turned to me and said: ‘I used to be myself and I’m now white guy, white guy.’ I said: ‘Finally, you understand.’

She went on to question the role of social media in policing personal development.

to the issue of political correctness, she reflected on her debut novel White Teeth, which had depicted characters from many backgrounds but, she said, had been given an easy ride by the white critics because “[its characters] were mostly brown.

citing Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary as an example of the power of the reprobate imagination. “Women have felt very close to these fake, pretend women invented by men. It makes us feel uncomfortable in real life. This is not real life. It’s perverse, but it’s what’s possible in fiction. There’s no excuse for its irresponsibility, but fiction is fundamentally irresponsible.”

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more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

21st Century Teaching

6 Key Trends to 21st Century Teaching

Richard Nattoo

https://www.edsurge.com/research/guides/21st-century-teaching-guide

OER on the rise

Colleges around the country have also started hiring staff members with titles like OER Coordinator and Affordable Content Librarian. Our series looked into how the movement is changing, and the research into the costsand benefits. You can even hear a podcast version here.

Flipped classrooms seem to be growing exponentially

Robert Talbert, a professor of mathematics at Grand Valley State University and author of the book Flipped Learning. Talbert recently tabulated how many scholarly articles are published each year about “flipping” instruction, meaning that traditional lecture-style material is delivered before class (often using videos) so that classroom time can be used for discussion and other more active learning.

OER on the rise

More professors are looking to experts to help them teach. (Though some resist.)

By 2016, there were an estimated 13,000 instructional designers on U.S. campuses, according to a report by Intentional Futures. And that number seems to be growing.

There’s also a growing acceptance of the scholarly discipline known as “learning sciences,” a body of research across disciplines of cognitive science, computer science, psychology, anthropology and other fields trying to unlock secrets of how people learn and how to best teach.

here’s a classic study that shows that professors think they’re better teachers than they actually are

The classroom isn’t the only place to learn

experiments with putting office hours online to get students to show up, bringing virtual reality to science labs to broaden what students could explore there, and changing how homework and tests are written.

Students are also finding their own new ways to learn online, by engaging in online activism. The era of a campus bubble seems over in the age of Twitter

Colleges are still struggling to find the best fit for online education

We dove into what lessons can be learned from MOOCs, as well what research so far about which audiences online can best serve.

And what does it mean to teach an age of information overload and polarization?

Perhaps the toughest questions of all about teaching in the 21st century is what exactly is the professor’s role in the Internet age. Once upon a time the goal was to be the ‘sage on the stage,’ when lecturing was king. Today many people argue that the college instructor should be more of a ‘guide on the side.’ But as one popular teaching expert notes, even that may not quite fit.

And in an era of intense political polarization, colleges and professors are looking for best to train students to become digitally literate so they can play their roles as informed citizens. But just how to do that is up for debate, though some are looking for a nonpartisan solution.

 

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