InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'Digital literacy' Category

disconnect

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th February 2015




What Happens When Teens Try to Disconnect From Tech For Three Days

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/03/turned-off-how-teens-respond-to-a-no-tech-challenge/

Posted in digital identity, Digital literacy, technology literacy, video | No Comments »

social media in the library

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 18th February 2015

Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library

Vanwynsberghe, H. )., Boudry, E. )., Verdegem, P. )., & Vanderlinde, R. ). (2014). Experts as facilitators for the implementation of social media in the library? A social network approach. Library Hi Tech, 32(3), 529-545. doi:10.1108/LHT-02-2014-0015

Excellent article. Apparently, they do things differently in Belgium.

“Social media literacy” (SML) can be defined as not only the practical
and critically cognitive competencies possessed by users of social media, but also the
motivation to employ these media effectively and appropriately for social interaction
and communication on the web (Vanwynsberghe and Verdegem, 2013).

Repeated by me numerous times, but ignored consistently.

p. 530 Therefore, the aim of this study is to empirically assess how a social media expert, or the employee with the most knowledge and skills concerning social media, in the library facilitates, or impedes, the information flow and implementation of social media in the library.
p. 541 The findings suggest that such social media experts play a significant role in either supporting or constraining the information flow and implementation of social media.

5.2 A social media expert plays an important role in the library for spreading
information about social media Unsurprisingly, social media experts are the most central actors for giving social media information; they share more social media information with other librarians and rarely receive information in return. Any information they do receive mostly comes from a person skilled in social media use. The social media expert as the central actor in the information network has the power to facilitate or prevent information exchange about social media (Scott and Carrington, 2012).

this is, if the experts are ALLOWED to participate. What if the social media access is usurped by very few others?

even worse, what if the social media is decentralized across?

 

Posted in Digital literacy, Library and information science, media literacy, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

digital literacy instruction for SCSU Health class

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 18th February 2015

Digital literacy instruction for Troy Shafer SCSU Health class

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/health/ or
http://scsu.mn/1AFO7V2

It is tailored after the instructor’s requests.

What would you add to the list?

Posted in Digital literacy, technology literacy | No Comments »

on digital literacy and old habits

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 18th February 2015

“Academic libraries are concerned about the digital literacy of their users but their programs continue to be focused on the information components defined by the President’s Commission on Information Literacy.” (p. 45)

Cordell, R.  (2013). Library Instruction in the 21st Century. In: Rosanne, M (Ed.) Library Reference Services and Information Literacy: Models for Academic Institutions: Models for Academic Institutions. IGI Global.

More on digital literacy in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=library+digital+literacy

Posted in Digital literacy, information literacy, Library and information science | 1 Comment »

Horizon Report 2015

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th February 2015

2015-nmc-horizon-report-HE-EN

Horizon Report > 2015 Higher Education Edition

Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption in Higher Education 6
Long-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for five or more years
> Advancing Cultures of Change and Innovation 8
> Increasing Cross-Institution Collaboration 10
Mid-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for three to five years
> Growing Focus on Measuring Learning 12
> Proliferation of Open Educational Resources 14
Short-Term Trends: Driving Ed Tech adoption in higher education for the next one to two years
> Increasing Use of Blended Learning 16
> Redesigning Learning Spaces 18
Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption in Higher Education 20
Solvable Challenges: Those that we understand and know how to solve
> Blending Formal and Informal Learning 22
> Improving Digital Literacy 24
Difficult Challenges: Those we understand but for which solutions are elusive
> Personalizing Learning 26
> Teaching Complex Thinking 28
Wicked Challenges: Those that are complex to even define, much less address
> Competing Models of Education 30
> Rewarding Teaching 32
Important Developments in Educational Technology for Higher Education 34

Posted in Digital literacy, e-learning, hybrid learning, mobile learning | No Comments »

Library Use of eBooks, 2013 Edition

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 13th February 2015

Library Use of eBooks, 2013 Edition

http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mq2u7gc/library_use_of_ebooks_2013_edition

The study also covers: use of eBooks for course reserves, eBook issues in interlibrary loan, and the emergence of dedicated endowments for eBook purchases. The study also covers the types of eBook models preferred by libraries of different types, and how librarians view likely developments in the eBook industry.

Posted in Digital literacy, ebook, information literacy, information technology | No Comments »

Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th February 2015

Differences between Discussion Boards, Blogs and Wikis

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/staff/resources/tutorials/content/Differences_between_Discussion_Boards__Blogs_and_Wikis.html

Differences

Discussion Forums are TOPIC centred.

  • discussions are organised into topics by ‘threads’
  • anyone in the community can start a thread on a topic of their choosing
  • all participants have an equal voice
  • posts require someone to reply for a discussion to take place
  • you can follow through a thread on a particular topic
Blogs are AUTHOR centred.

  • posts are made by the blog’s author only (may be a group)
  • posts are usually opinion pieces and written in the authors voice
  • readers can add comments to the author’s post
  • organised in reverse chronological order so the most recent posts show on the entry page
  • reflect the authors identity in the tone, look and feel and content
Wikis are CONTENT/DOCUMENT centred.

  • wikis are for group authoring
  • editable website with a complete version history kept
  • aim is to reach a consensus or compromise on the content of the page
  • the focus is the content produced, not the individual authors
  • usually neutral and objective
  • discussion/comment is separated from the wiki content

Posted in blog, Digital literacy, Discussion List, e-learning, instructional technology, online learning, open learning, social media | No Comments »

3d printing libraries

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 10th February 2015

From: Almond, Emily [mailto:ealmond@georgialibraries.org]
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 6:28 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: Re: 3D printing in libraries

Hi guys, we have 21 3D printers in public libraries in GA and we created this resource page to help our libs decide what works for them: http://galibtech.org/?page_id=1052

Also, our system administrator Daniel Zeiger, had these thoughts:

UP mini if you want something cheap and plug and play. ~$600 dollars and doesn’t need much maintenance but its build plate is fairly small (this can be a good thing if you don’t want prints that can run all night).

For a little more you can grab the UP plus 2/Afinia H480 which gives you a larger build plate and allows you to see the print from any angle while printing. The plus 2 also self levels which takes a huge step out of the printing process.

If you want something that requires a bit more maintenance but also gives you much more control over your printer and settings (and a larger build plate) I would go for the FlashForge Creator Pro or the Ultimaker 2. Both of these offer superior print quality and control, but require more tinkering and knowledge to print successfully.

Emily Almond

Director, IT

Georgia Public Library Service
On Feb 6, 2015, at 12:09 PM, Amy Jiang <ajiang@laverne.edu> wrote:

Ajiang@laverne.edu
 
On Feb 6, 2015, at 8:21 AM, cherie bronkar <cheriebr35@yahoo via <dmarc_fix@lists.ala.org> wrote:

cbronkar@kent.edu

Cherie

On Friday, February 6, 2015 11:12 AM, Janet Ann Crum <Janet.Crum@nau.edu> wrote:

Great idea! I’d be happy to help with that.

 

Janet

Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 6, 2015, at 9:05 AM, Cindi Blyberg <cindiann@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey all!

Is there interest in forming a LITA Interest Group around 3D printing or Makerspaces?

More information about IGs can be found here:

http://www.ala.org/lita/about/manual/litamanualsection6

and the petition to form one is here:

http://www.ala.org/lita/sites/ala.org.lita/files/content/about/manual/forms/E5-IGpetition%20renewa.pdf

Other groups have collected signatures via Google doc, but some have been formed during the middle of a conference.

Have fun! :)

On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 6:30 PM, Matt Beckstrom <MBeckstrom@lclibrary.org> wrote:

I may not be able to recommend any particular 3D printer model, but I can recommend a service that we use that makes offering 3D printers to my patrons really easy.  We use an online system called Skyforge from a company called Element Robot (https://skyforge.co/home/).  This system facilitates the uploading of 3d plans, the payment of them, and printing them to the printer.  It really is a time saver for me and my staff.

If you have any questions, please let me know.

 

Matt Beckstrom
mbeckstrom@lclibrary.org

Systems Librarian
Lewis & Clark Library
120 S Last Chance Gulch
Helena, MT  59601

http://www.lclibrary.org
(406)  447-1690 x111

>>> John Fitzgibbon <jfitzgibbon@Galwaylibrary.ie> 2/5/2015 3:55 AM >>>

Hi,

We are interested in providing access to 3D printers in our largest library. Our hope is to make the printer available to children between the ages of ten and fifteen so that they would gain experience in designing and creating three dimensional artifacts.

I am not sure if there is a 3D printer that is that user friendly.  Is it feasible to provide this service to this target audience? What is the best 3D printer to use?

I would appreciate any advice.

Regards

John

John Fitzgibbon

Executive Librarian

 

w: www.galwaylibrary.ie

 

 

 

 

 

Previous IMS posts on 3d printing:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=3d+printing

Posted in Digital literacy, Library and information science, technology literacy | 1 Comment »

privacy smart devices

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 10th February 2015

Samsung’s Privacy Policy Warns Customers Their Smart TVs Are Listening

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/09/385001258/samsungs-privacy-policy-warns-customers-their-smart-tvs-are-listening

All of Samsung’s smart TVs — which take voice commands — come with a warning to consumers that essentially says: Your TV is listening and might be sending what you say to Samsung and a third party responsible for transcribing what you say.

Posted in Digital literacy, technology literacy | No Comments »

GIS and GeoWeb Technologies

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 4th February 2015

https://www.libraryjuiceacademy.com/moodle/login/index.php

Eva Dodsworth

Since the emergence of easily accessible dynamic online mapping tools, there has been a drastic increase in geographic interest and awareness. Whether for personal, social, professional or academic uses, people are using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to communicate information in a map format. Whether it’s using Google Earth to study urban change, or creating Google Map Mashups to deliver library resources, more and more members of society are turning to mapping programs for their visualization needs. With so many using GIS technology in their daily lives, library staff are now more than ever assisting library clients with their mapping queries.

This course will introduce students to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies such Google Earth and the creation of dynamic KML files; ArcGIS Online and webmap publishing; Google Fusion Tables and geocoding; and GIS fundamentals with geospatial data creation. Students will be able to apply their GIS skills in their reference work, in digitization projects, in webpages, in library instruction, and more.  Through hands-on exercises, pre-recorded demonstrations and lectures, students will receive a thorough overview of mapping resources that will enhance and expose their library’s resources.

 

http://www.placingliterature.com/map?modal=1

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part_One.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekThree_Part2.mov

http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/WeekFour.mov

 

– How to enable offline maps in your Google Maps app – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/map-happy/how-to-enable-offline-maps_b_6525832.html

– Huge news – Google Earth Pro, which used to cost the public $400 is now free! What does that mean for you? Extra features! You can import GIS files, tables, and export animated movie files!  http://google-latlong.blogspot.com.es/2015/01/google-earth-pro-is-now-free.html

– Don’t live in Canada?  Too bad! Google Maps plots best tobagonning hills in Canada!http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/google-map-plots-canada-s-best-tobogganing-hills-1.2218207

– a map of 19 countries that were named after specific people – http://www.vox.com/2015/2/1/7954179/map-countries-pe

 

Maps that shaped the world

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30840318

 

 

Content for Week Two – February 9th – February 15th

Week Two:

Podcast includes:

  • Citizen Mapping
  • OpenStreetMap – crowdsourcing
    more heads are better then one
    NYPL geomapping volunteers.

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

  • Google Map Maker

    Google Map Maker

  • http://www.google.com/mapmaker

    citizenmapping scientific geograph are synonyms for crowdsourcing

citizen crime reporting app for NYPD http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_mapping/nyc_crime_map_introduction.shtml

when the jet disappeared, crowdsourcing for parts on the satellite maps of the ocean

potholes map

maps of the threes. emerald bug in Mnpls

http://www.fuf.net/

how does foursquare and checkins in FB and Google +fit it

  • Google Earth
  • Assignment

Podcast and Powerpoint can be accessed from:http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: Google Earth

Assignments:

1.       Discussion question:

Discover some citizen mapping projects that you are interested in OR

Contribute your local knowledge to Google Map Maker AND Share with the class online

2.       Google Earth Map

Please complete the tutorial and then create a map in Google Earth with the following components:

  • A title
  • A written introduction to your project
  • At least five placemarks, embedded with html tags, and images, if possible.
  • Imported KML file(s) file format by GEarth, but other apps is using it. using notepad or MS Word, one can create KML file.
    screen overlay, can be text, image, anything. legend. HTML code.
  • A screen overlay  (i.e. a legend)

areal photography.

history.
images from the library, Google is willing to buy them. citizen mapping. scanning and uploading.

geographical and societal awareness.

Gallery: 360Cities.

google street view – historical views

Google Earth Mapping

Submit online as a KML/KMZ file

I had the opportunity to experience a gizmo that can be used to display a variety of mapping projects, including citizen mapping: Science on a Sphere. It is a sphere on which you can project static maps or animations. The one I saw, in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s facility on Ford Island in Honolulu, displayed animations showing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 tsunami in Japan, as well as airline flight paths, ocean currents, polar ice cap change over time, and many other types of geospatial data.

The Great Backyard Bird Count actually starts today and runs through Monday, February 16th. At a minimum, it only requires 15 minutes of observation on any or all the days:  http://gbbc.birdcount.org/

Happy Cow is a site well-known to many vegetarians/vegans for finding restaurants which I’ve used when travelling. Users can submit reviews and/or restaurants that they’d like profiled (although the site reserves the right to approve or not the listing). http://www.happycow.net/search.html 

———————————–

wq and leaflet – a framework that could catch on
by Timothy Clarke - Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2:21 PM

One of the impediments to citizen mapping is the line-of-sight cell tower limitations of mobile phones, or the wifi requirements for other mobile devices.  Citizen mapping in urban and suburban environments is well-served by mobile devices, but what about natural areas, dense leaf cover, or extreme topography?  Even if obtaining absolute mapping coordinates isn’t the issue, much crowdsourcing assumes an ability to connect back to a central data repository (e.g., a web database, ‘the cloud’).  Equipment that can interact with GPS satellites and support data capture is typically expensive and generally requires proprietary software.

wq (https://wq.io/) is a framework that is ‘device first’ and ‘offline-enabled’.  It attempts to leverage several open source technologies to build an entire mobile solution that can support citizen science data collection work, and then synchronize with a central repository once the device (and operator) return to an area served by cellular or wifi networks.

I’m stretching here, so if I get stuff wrong, please don’t yell.  Still, I’ll take a pass at generally describing the framework and its related technology stack.

wq relies upon python, and a web framework called django for building offline-capable web apps that can run on iOS and Android devices.  These web apps, then, rely very heavily upon javascript, particularly requirejs (http://requirejs.org/) and mustache (https://mustache.github.io/), for the templates that permit quick and (somewhat) painless web application development.  Data visualization relies upon d3.js (http://d3js.org/), and geography makes heavy use of Leaflet (http://leafletjs.com/) — maybe the most pertinent layer of the stack for those of us in this course.  If you’re not familiar withLeaflet.js, check it out!

Finally, wq extends several other open source technologies to enable synchronizing between a central data repository and multiple mobile devices in the hands of citizen mappers.  Lastly, wq employs a set of tools to more easily build and distribute customized mapping apps that can be served from Apple’s app store, Google Play, etc.

What wq intends is to allow highly specialized citizen science/citizen mapping apps to be more easily and quickly built, based upon a solid collection of aligned F/OSS tools.  Ideally, an app can spin up quickly to respond to a particular need (e.g., a pipeline spill), or a specialized audience (the run up to a public comment period for a development project), or even something like a high school field trip or higher ed service learning project.

Some examples of citizen mapping projects already built upon wq are here:

https://wq.io/examples/

—————–

Creating a walking tour map with Google Earth_2014

————-

Week 3

Podcast includes:

  • Geocoding
  • Georeferencing
  • Spatial Data Formats
  • Geospatial Data Online
  • Discussion Question

Podcast and Powerpoint available from: http://www.lib.uwaterloo.ca/locations/umd/JuicyLibrarianMaterial.html

Tutorials: BatchGeo (optional); Google Fusion (optional)

https://en.batchgeo.com/

enter Xcel data, and export KLM file ready for google map and/or google earth

https://support.google.com/fusiontables/answer/2571232

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Fusion_Tables

store maps online, no latitude needed.
visualize geospatial data by map
spatial analysis by mapping different layers together
showing data by map, graph or chart
e.g. how many cars cross specific point
crowdsourcing: spotting butterflies, using fusion tables to map the spices and sightings
http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2011/mar/31/deprivation-map-indices-multiple

students: journalism, history, geography.

Georeferencing (geocoding – data, geo referencing – image)
historical air maps or photos are much more useful when they are georeferenced.
Photos from different year is difficult to lay over one another without referencing. the only reference might be the river. usually reference the four corners, but sometimes river. Using GIS program to determine the longitute/latitude for each corner. sometimes only farmland and it is impossible

 

Posted in Digital literacy, information technology, instructional technology | 2 Comments »