Archive of ‘Digital literacy’ category

3D Printing Project-Based Curriculum

Inside WIT’s 3D Printing Project-Based Curriculum

Who better to learn about incorporating 3D printing into instruction than from an instructor who taught the curriculum?

Join us on October 26th to hear directly from Assistant Professor Steve Chomyszak who used Stratasys 3D Printing Curriculum to teach a “Special Topics” 3D printing course at the Wentworth Institute of Technology.

During this complimentary webcast, you’ll gain valuable insight into the successes and lessons learned, including:

  • Overview of the 14-week project-based 3D printing curriculum
  • How an interactive learning environment impacted and inspired WIT students
  • How the WIT 3D printing lab went from crickets to buzzing
  • How curriculum measured up according to students
  • And so much more!

photo sharing and libraries

Photo-sharing Site as Library Tool : A Web-based Survey
peer-reviewed article for Digital Library Perspectives:

opportunity to user to develop a sense of ownership over the library resources.

Photo-sharing sites  already  have  taken  sharp  inroads  into  the  field  of  teaching-learnin encouraging a shift from teacher-led approach to user centred engagement (Kawka, et al,2012).

Introducing photo-sharing sites and integrating with other social networking sites, libraries are now making their web presence outside the “traditional web platform”. With facility of online  managing  and  sharing  of  digital  images,  photo-sharing  sites  enable  users  to  get remotely connected with others and interact with comment links. Photo-sharing sites that are commonly being used by libraries are Flickr (, Instagram (, Pinterest  (,   Photobucket   (,   Picasa   (, SmugMug (, etc (Bradley, 2007; Kroski, 2008; Salomon, 2013).

The results showed that blog and RSS are among the mostly used applications and web 0 applications are associated with overall website quality,  particularly to  the  service  quality.

Stvilia and  Jörgensen  (2010) suggests that  controlled  vocabulary  terms  may  be

37 complemented with those user generated tags which users feel more comfortable with for information The study also reflects a growing interest among the user community to be involved in “social content creation and sharing communities in creating and enhancing the metadata of their photo collections to make the collections more accessible and visible”.

page 7-8.
2.1 Steps to increase accessibility to photo-sharing sites
a)  Improve visibility: To make photo-sharing sites of the library easily visible, a direct link to library homepage is essential

p. 9
2.2 Purposes of using photo-sharing sites
a)   Organising library tour
b) Community building
c)   Tool for digitisation
d) Grabbing the users at their own place
e)   Integrating  Feeds  with  other  application
f)   Displaying new arrivals : Newly added books
g)   Sharing news & events and publicize library activities
h)   Archives of exhibits
i) Portal for academic and research activity:   Photo-sharing sites may serve as platform tofoster teaching learning activity, particularly for those who may use these image resource sites for academic purpose
j)  Experimentation : Being a relatively new approach to users service, these tools may be introduced on experimental basis to examine their proper utilisation before final implementation
k) Miscellaneous :  Public  library  can  reach  out  to  the  community  physically,  offer service to  the  traditionally  underserved,  homebound  or  people  with  disability, implement programmes  to  include  marginalised  section  of  the  community  and showcase its mobile outreach efforts in photo-sharing sites.

page 12-13
Before  going  to  integrate  photo-sharing  site,  a  library  should  set  the  strategic  objectives i.e., what purposes are to be served. “Purpose can provide clarity of vision when creating policies or  guidelines”  (Garofalo,  2013,  p.28).  The above discussedrange  of  purposes  may  help  librarians  to  develop  better  understanding  to  makeinformed  selection  of  photo-sharing  utility and  the  nature  of  images  to  be  posted through it. Goal setting should precede consideration of views of a sizeable section of all library stakeholders to know beforehand what they expect from the library.
•    Once the purposes are outlined, a library should formulate policy/ guideline for photo-sharing practices, based on user requirement, staff resource, available time component and technological support base. Policy offers a clear guideline for the users and staff to decide the kind of images to be posted.   A guideline is indeed essential for the optimum use of photo-sharing site. It also delineates the roles and responsibilities of the staff concerned and ensures regular monitoring of the posts. Policy may highlight fair use guidelines and allow re-use of images within the scope of copy-right.
•    A best way to start is integrating an app, involving simple design with fewer images and let users be familiarized with the system. During the course of development more and more apps may be added, with more images to be posted to serve variety of purposes, depending on the institutional resource and user demand.
•    Accessibility to photo-sharing site largely depends on its visibility to the audience. Icon  of  photo-sharing  utility  prominently  located  on  website  will  increase  the presentation of its visual identity. Library may set links to photo-sharing sites at home page or at drilled-down page.
•    Being  an  emerging  technology,  photo-sharing  site  needs  adequate  exposure  for optimum usage. Annotations associated to photo-sharing site will give an idea about the online tool and will guide users to better harness the application.
•    Photo-sharing sites allow images to be organised in a variety of way. Categorising image resources under various topical headings at one location will improve resource identification and frees one from extensive searching.
•    Regular posting of engaging images to photo-sharing site from the library and follow- up will attract users to tag and share images and strengthen community involvement with active user participation.
•    “Social and informal photographs” of library staff will make them more approachable and strengthen patron-staff relationship.
•    Library should seek user comments and suggestions to improve current photo-sharing application  and  to  incorporate  fresh  element  to  library  service  provision.  User feedback may be considered as a tool to evaluate the effectiveness of existing photo- sharing practices.
•    To  popularise  the  effort,  usual  promotional  media  like  physical  and  online  signs/ displays  apart,   library  may  use   social   media  marketing  platforms   like   blogs, Facebook, Twitter, etc., and increase awareness of photo-sharing tools.
•    Imparting technology training may develop necessary knowledge; improve skill, and change the attitude and mindset of library professionals to handle issues related to using this web-based powered-tools and repurpose existing accessibility settings.
•    To provide quick link to photo-sharing site from anywhere in the web, a library may use add-ons / plug-ins to embed image sharing tools.
•    Photo-sharing site may be implemented to satisfy multiple approach options of users. A section  of  users  use  photo-sharing site  to have  a glimpse  of  the  newly arrived documents, highlights of catalogue, rare books, etc.   Some others may use it to find images of historical importance with context. New users may find it attractive to pay


IoT for Product Managers

Internet of Things: A Primer for Product Managers

The first step to becoming an IoT Product Manager is to understand the 5 layers of the IoT technology stack.

5 layers of IoT

1. Devices

Devices constitute the “things” in the Internet of Things. They act as the interface between the real and digital worlds.

2. Embedded software

Embedded software is the part that turns a device into a “smart device”. This part of the IoT technology stack enables the concept of “software-defined hardware”, meaning that a particular hardware device can serve multiple applications depending on the embedded software it is running.

Embedded Operating System

The complexity of your IoT solution will determine the type of embedded Operating System (OS) you need. Some of the key considerations include whether your application needs a real-time OS, the type of I/O support you need, and whether you need support for the full TCP/IP stack.

Common examples of embedded OS include Linux, Brillo (scaled-down Android), Windows Embedded, and VxWorks, to name a few.

Embedded Applications

This is the application(s) that run on top of the embedded OS and provide the functionality that’s specific to your IoT solution.

3. Communications

Communications refers to all the different ways your device will exchange information with the rest of the world. This includes both physical networks and the protocols you will use.

4. Cloud Platform

The cloud platform is the backbone of your IoT solution. If you are familiar with managing SaaS offerings, then you are well aware of everything that is entailed here. Your infrastructure will serve as the platform for these key areas:

Data Collection and Management

Your smart devices will stream information to the cloud. As you define the requirements of your solution, you need to have a good idea of the type and amount of data you’ll be collecting on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis.


Analytics are one of they key components of any IoT solution. By analytics, I’m referring to the ability to crunch data, find patterns, perform forecasts, integrate machine learning, etc. It is the ability to find insights from your data and not the data alone that makes your solution valuable.

Cloud APIs

The Internet of Things is all about connecting devices and sharing data. This is usually done by exposing APIs at either the Cloud level or the device level. Cloud APIs allow your customers and partners to either interact with your devices or to exchange data. Remember that opening an API is not a technical decision, it’s a business decision.

Related post: The Business of APIs: What Product Managers Need to Plan For

5. Applications

This is the part of the stack that is most easily understood by Product teams and Executives. Your end-user applications are the part of the system that your customer will see and interact with. These applications will most likely be Web-based, and depending on your user needs, you might need separate apps for desktop, mobile, and even wearables.

The Bottom Line

As the Internet of Things continues to grow, the world will need an army of IoT-savvy Product Managers. And those Product Managers will need to understand each layer of the stack, and how they all fit together into a complete IoT solution.


more on Internet of Things in this blog:

bibliography on Arduino use in education

Bibliography on Arduino use in education:

peer-reviewed – permanent link to the SCSU online database search (Arduino + Education)

Almeida Cavalcante, M. (2013). Novas tecnologias no estudo de ondas sonoras. Caderno Brasileiro De Ensino De Física, 30(3), 579-613.

Almeida Cavalcante, M., Tavares Rodrigues, T. T., & Andrea Bueno, D. (2013). CONTROLE REMOTO: PRINCIPIO DE FUNCIONAMENTO (parte 1 de 2). Caderno Brasileiro De Ensino De Física, 30(3), 554-565.

Atkin, K. (2016). Construction of a simple low-cost teslameter and its use with arduino and MakerPlot software. Physics Education, 51(2), 1-1.

Galeriu, C., Edwards, S., & Esper, G. (2014). An arduino investigation of simple harmonic motion. Physics Teacher, 52(3), 157-159.

Galeriu, C., Letson, C., & Esper, G. (2015). An arduino investigation of the RC circuit. Physics Teacher, 53(5), 285-288.

Grinias, J. P., Whitfield, J. T., Guetschow, E. D., & Kennedy, R. T. (2016). An inexpensive, open-source USB arduino data acquisition device for chemical instrumentation. Journal of Chemical Education, 93(7), 1316-1319.

Kuan, W., Tseng, C., Chen, S., & Wong, C. (2016). Development of a computer-assisted instrumentation curriculum for physics students: Using LabVIEW and arduino platform. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 25(3), 427-438.

Kubínová, Š., & Šlégr, J. (2015). Physics demonstrations with the arduino board. Physics Education, 50(4), 472-474.

Kubínová, Š., & Šlégr, J. (2015). ChemDuino: Adapting arduino for low-cost chemical measurements in lecture and laboratory. Journal of Chemical Education, 92(10), 1751-1753.

Kubínova´, S., & S?le´gr, J. (2015). ChemDuino: Adapting arduino for low-cost chemical measurements in lecture and laboratory. Journal of Chemical Education, 92(10), 1751-1753.

López-Rodríguez, F. M., & Cuesta, F. (2016). Andruino-A1: Low-cost educational mobile robot based on android and arduino. Journal of Intelligent & Robotic Systems, 81(1), 63-76.

McClain, R. L. (2014). Construction of a photometer as an instructional tool for electronics and instrumentation. Journal of Chemical Education, 91(5), 747-750.

Musik, P. (2010). Development of computer-based experiment in physics for charging and discharging of a capacitor. Annual International Conference on Computer Science Education: Innovation & Technology, , I111-I116.

Pagliuca, G., Arduino, L. S., Barca, L., & Burani, C. (2008). Fully transparent orthography, yet lexical reading aloud: The lexicality effect in italian. Language and Cognitive Processes, 23(3), 422-433.

Park, S., Kim, W., & Seo, S. (2015). Development of the educational arduino module using the helium gas airship. Modern Physics Letters B, 29(6), -1.

Pereira, A. M., Santos, A. C. F., & Amorim, H. S. (2016). Estatística de contagem com a plataforma arduino. Caderno Brasileiro De Ensino De Física, 38(4), 1-8.

Sulpizio, S., Arduino, L. S., Paizi, D., & Burani, C. (2013). Stress assignment in reading italian polysyllabic pseudowords. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39(1), 51-68.

Teikari, P., Najjar, R. P., Malkki, H., Knoblauch, K., Dumortier, D., Gronfier, C., et al. (2012). An inexpensive arduino-based LED stimulator system for vision research. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 211(2), 227-236.

Walzik, M. P., Vollmar, V., Lachnit, T., Dietz, H., Haug, S., Bachmann, H., et al. (2015). A portable low-cost long-term live-cell imaging platform for biomedical research and education. Biosensors & Bioelectronics, 64, 639-649.

Zachariadou, K., Yiasemides, K., & Trougkakos, N. (2012). A low-cost computer-controlled arduino-based educational laboratory system for teaching the fundamentals of photovoltaic cells. European Journal of Physics, 33(6), 1599-1610.

Zubrycki, I., & Granosik, G. (2014). Introducing modern robotics with ros and arduino, including case studies. Journal of Automation, Mobile Robotics & Intelligent Systems, 8(1), 69-75.



popular literature:

20 Projects To Celebrate Arduino Day


more on Arduino in this IMS blog

gaming and learning

a new paper published on gaming habits and education:

gaming and learning

Mozelius, P., Westin, T., Wiklund, M., & Norbert, L. (2016). Gaming habits, study habits and compulsive gaming among digital gaming natives. Retrieved from

more on gaming in this IMS blog:

research and literature review

Roberts, C. (2010). The Dissertation Journey. A Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Planing, Writing, and Defending Your Dissertation. Corwin, Thousand Oaks, CA.

Chapter 9.

Purpose and scope

We talked about “themes” and the need to be careful with breaking them into “subthemes”: if you do a historical overview, avoid chunking it into “dates” and rather keep the thematic relation. Make sure that the relate to your topic; that’s why it is good to keep your title (even if preliminary), outline (even if in progress), thesis (even if under work) etc. on the first page of your Chapter 2 manuscript / draft.

  1. 87

Writing a conceptual framework from Wylie Tidwell, III

Formulate your research question / thesis

NISO Webinar IoT

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. (Eastern Time)

About the Webinar

As the cost of sensors and the connectivity necessary to support those sensors has decreased, this has given rise to a network of interconnected devices.  This network is often described as the Internet of Things and it is providing a variety of information management challenges.  For the library and publishing communities, the internet of things presents opportunities and challenges around data gathering, organization and processing of the tremendous amounts of data which the internet of things is generating.  How will these data be incorporated into traditional publication, archiving and resource management systems?  Additionally, how will the internet of things impact resource management within our community?   In what ways will interconnected resources provide a better user experience for patrons and readers?  This session will introduce concepts and potential implications of the internet of things on the information management community.  It will also explore applications related to managing resources in a library environment that are being developed and implemented.

Education in the Internet of Things
Bryan Alexander, Consultant;

How will the Internet of Things shape education? We can explore this question by assessing current developments, looking for future trends in the first initial projects. In this talk I point to new concepts for classroom and campus spaces, examining attendant rises in data gathering and analysis. We address student life possibilities and curricular and professional niches. We conclude with notes on campus strategy, including privacy, network support, and futures-facing organizations.

What Does The Internet of Things Mean to a Museum?
Robert Weisberg, Senior Project Manager, Publications and Editorial Department; Metropolitan Museum of Art;

What does the Internet of Things mean to a museum? Museums have slowly been digitizing their collections for years, and have been replacing index cards with large (and costly, and labor-intensive) CMS’s long before that, but several factors have worked against adopting smart and scalable practices which could unleash data for the benefit of the institution, its collection, and its audiences. Challenges go beyond non-profit budgets in a very for-profit world and into the siloed behaviors learned from academia, practices borne of the uniqueness of museum collections, and the multi-faceted nature of modern museums which include not only curator, but conservators, educators, librarians, publishers, and increasing numbers of digital specialists. What have museums already done, what are they doing, and what are they preparing for, as big data becomes bigger and ever more-networked?
The Role of the Research Library in Unpacking The Internet of Things
Lauren di Monte, NCSU Libraries Fellow, Cyma Rubin Fellow, North Carolina State University

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a deceptively simple umbrella term for a range of socio-technical tools and processes that are shaping our social and economic worlds. Indeed, IoT represents a new infrastructural layer that has the power to impact decision-making processes, resources distribution plans, information access, and much more. Understanding what IoT is, how “things” get networked, as well as how IoT devices and tools are constructed and deployed, are important and emerging facets of information literacy. Research libraries are uniquely positioned to help students, researchers, and other information professionals unpack IoT and understand its place within our knowledge infrastructures and digital cultures. By developing and modeling the use of IoT devices for space and program assessment, by teaching patrons how to work with IoT hardware and software, and by developing methods and infrastructures to collect IoT devices and data, we can help our patrons unlock the potential of IoT and harness the power of networked knowledge.

Lauren Di Monte is a Libraries Fellow at NC State. In this role she develops programs that facilitate critical and creative engagements with technologies and develops projects to bring physical and traditional computing into scholarship across the disciplines. Her current research explores the histories and futures of STEM knowledge practices.

What does the internet of things mean for education?

Bryan Alexander:

I’m not sure if the IoT will hit academic with the wave force of the Web in the 1990s, or become a minor tangent.  What do schools have to do with Twittering refrigerators?

Here are a few possible intersections.

  1. Changing up the campus technology space.  IT departments will face supporting more technology strata in a more complex ecosystem.  Help desks and CIOs alike will have to consider supporting sensors, embedded chips, and new devices.  Standards, storage, privacy, and other policy issues will ramify.
  2. Mutating the campus.  We’ve already adjusted campus spaces by adding wireless coverage, enabling users and visitors to connect from nearly everywhere.  What happens when benches are chipped, skateboards sport sensors, books carry RFID, and all sorts of new, mobile devices dot the quad?  One British school offers an early example.
  3. New forms of teaching and learning.  Some of these take preexisting forms and amplify them, like tagging animals in the wild or collecting data about urban centers.  The IoT lets us gather more information more easily and perform more work upon it.  Then we could also see really new ways of learning, like having students explore an environment (built or natural) by using embedded sensors, QR codes, and live datastreams from items and locations.  Instructors can build treasure hunts through campuses, nature preserves, museums, or cities.  Or even more creative enterprises.
  4. New forms of research.  As with #3, but at a higher level.  Researchers can gather and process data using networked swarms of devices.  Plus academics studying and developing the IoT in computer science and other disciplines.
  5. An environmental transformation.  People will increasingly come to campus with experiences of a truly interactive, data-rich world.  They will expect a growing proportion of objects to be at least addressable, if not communicative.  This population will become students, instructors, and support staff.  They will have a different sense of the boundaries between physical and digital than we now have in 2014. Will this transformed community alter a school’s educational mission or operations?

How the internet could evolve to 2026: responding to Pew Posted on

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