Archive of ‘Digital literacy’ category

instructional designers and tech adoption

Survey: Instructional Designers ‘Pivotal’ in Tech Adoption

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/09/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/05/09/survey-instructional-designers-pivotal-in-tech-adoption.aspx

Managing projects is the most common task instructional designers undertake during their days, followed by technology and pedagogical training. Their biggest obstacle to success on the job is faculty resistance. The most important expertise they possess as a whole is the ability to learn new technologies, followed by project management and learning science or theory. Their favorite tools to work with are Camtasia and Adobe products; their least-favorite are Blackboard and learning management systems in general.

  • Consider adding more resources in the area of instructional design. If that isn’t possible, at least consider involving instructional designers “early” and “often” during technology transitions.”
  • “Incentivize” faculty to work with instructional designers “from the get-go” in order to help them learn how to engage with their students and expand class time through the use of online tools.
  • Technology providers should work closely with instructional designers in the selection of digital tools.

The report, “Instructional Design in Higher Education,” is freely available on the Intentional Futures website here.

Instructional Design in Higher Education

http://intentionalfutures.com/reports/instructional_design/

p. 4 Graph: median number of instructional designers by type of institution. According to the graph, SCSU must have between 3 and 16 instructional designers.

p. 10.“While a ‘jack-of-all-trades’ can get by in instructional design, the best instructional designers are ‘aces-of-many-trades’,with authentic experience and training in all aspects of the process.”

p. 12“Management choose[s] tools that are cheap and never ask[s] about integration or accessibility.Then we spend enormous amounts of time trying to get them to work.”

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more in this IMS blog on instructional design

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional

pop computing

American schools are teaching our kids how to code all wrong

Idit Harel CEO, Globaloria, May 25, 2016

The light and fluffy version of computer science—which is proliferating as a superficial response to the increased need for coders in the workplace—is a phenomenon I refer to as “pop computing.” While calling all policy makers and education leaders to consider “computer science education for all” is a good thing, the coding culture promoted by Code.org and its library of movie-branded coding apps provide quick experiences of drag-and-drop code entertainment.

playing with coding apps as compared to learning to design an app using code. Building an app takes time and requires multi-dimensional learning contexts, pathways and projects.

Computing and computer science is the equivalent of immersing in a thicker study of music—its origins, influences, aesthetics, applications, theories, composition, techniques, variations and meanings. In other words, the actual foundations and experiences that change an individual’s mindset.

As noted by MIT’s Marvin Minsky and Alan Kay, computational innovation and literacy have much in common with music literacy. Just as would-be musicians become proficient by listening improvising and composing, and not just by playing other people’s compositions, so would-be programmers become proficient by designing prototypes and models that work for solving real problems, doing critical thinking and analysis, and creative collaboration—none of which can be accomplished in one hour of coding. In other words, just as a kid playing Guitar Hero wouldn’t be considered a musician, someone playing with coding apps isn’t exactly a coder or computer scientist.

more on coding in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=coding

storytelling and virtual reality

Is storytelling the key to VR’s future?

Virtual reality may be the closest to teleportation we will ever have in our lifetime.

More on virtual reality in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

more on storytelling in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=storytelling

Flipped Classrooms, Blended Learning, and Integrating Technology

PLANNING MEETING – Flipped Classrooms, Blended Learning, and Integrating Technology

Date: Thursday, May 26, 2016
Time: 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET
Presenters: Steve Gilbert  and many more

Description

In this session we will finalize the design of the May 27th & June 24th events. Link to planning document.

Here is a history of our work on this topic:

  • During our March 11th FridayLive! event, Irene Knokh helped us explore the flipped classroom.  There was interest expressed in building a flipped classroom toolkit.
  • On March 17th TLT Members were invited to start this work.
  • On March 24th TLT Members met and decided to create a Flipped/Blended Learning Series.
  • On March 31st the planning continued and the 3 part series has begun to take shape.
  • In April we decided to focus on 2 events.
  • On April 27th we finalized the dates (May 27 and June 24th) and began to design the first session.
  • On May 5th the design work continued
  • On May 11th the design work continued
  • On May 19th the design work continued

big data and the government

What can the government do about big data fairness?

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/05/23/big-data-fairness.aspx

At a Ford Foundation conference dubbed Fairness by Design, officials, academics and advocates discussed how to address the problem of encoding human bias in algorithmic analysis. The White House recently issued a report on the topic to accelerate research into the issue.

The FTC released two studies on how big data is used to segment consumers into profiles and interests.

U.S. CTO Megan Smith said the government has been “creating a seat for these techies,” but that training future generations of data scientists to tackle these issues depends on what we do today. “It’s how did we teach our children?” she said. “Why don’t we teach math and science the way we teach P.E. and art and music and make it fun?”

“Ethics is not just an elective, but some portion of the main core curriculum.”

more on big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

From ‘Design Thinking’ to ‘Design Knowing’

https://goo.gl/yLrG8l

Rachel Ivy Clarke, Ph.D. (@archivy) discussed the theoretical underpinnings that distinguish design knowledge from scientific knowledge and how it is relevant to research, teaching and practice in librarianship.

Recent years have seen an upsurge of interest in applying “design thinking” to library work, but librarianship also aligns with “design knowing”—foundations of knowledge in design that differentiate it from science.

The Blended Librarians Online Community for the webcast of the session

problem solving – who is doing and how.
how the problem is framed. e.g. is the classification system for the librarians or for the students. or both; a wicked problem

design is not an end product, but an ongoing
iteration. a procedure in which repetition of a sequence of operations yields results successively closer to a desired result
and reflection
in design, reflection is going throughout the entire process.

repertoire is the accumulation but not acknowledged.

rationale – why; critique, constructive, so what – research and education and practice

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