Archive of ‘Digital literacy’ category

NMC digital literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

The New Media Consortium (NMC) has released Digital Literacy in Higher Education, Part II: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief, a follow-up to its 2016 strategic brief on digital literacy.

PDF available here.
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But what does it really mean to be digitally literate, and which standards do we use?” said Dr. Eden Dahlstrom, NMC Executive Director. “This report sheds light on the meaning and impact of digital literacy using cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary approaches, highlighting frameworks and exemplars in practice.

NMC’s report has identified a need for institutions and thought leaders to consider the ways in which content creation is unequally expressed throughout the world. In an examination of digital literacy within European, Middle Eastern, and African nations (EMEA), research has surfaced unequal access to information technology based on inequalities of economics, gender, race, and political divides.

2020 2015
1. Complex Problem Solving 1. Complex Problem Solving
2. Critical Thinking 2. Coordinating with Others
3. Creativity 3. People  Management
4. People  Management 4. Critical Thinking
5. Coordinating with Others 5. Negotiation
6. Emotional  Intelligence 6. Quality Control
7. Judgment and Decision Making 7. Service  Orientation
8. Service  Orientation 8. Judgment and Decision Making
9. Negotiation 9. Active Listening
10. Cognitive  Flexibility 10. Creativity

Digital tools themselves are merely enablers, pushing the envelope of  what learners can create. No longer is it acceptable for students to be passive consumers of content; they can contribute to the local and global knowledge ecosystem, learning through the act of producing and discussing rich media, applications, and objects. In the words of many institutional mission statements, students do not have to wait until they graduate to change the world.

Using readily available  digital  content  creation tools (e.g., video production and editing, web and graphic tools), students are evolving into digital storytellers,

digital literacy now encompasses the important skills of being able to coordinate with others to create something truly original that neither mind would fathom independently.

The ability to discern credible from inaccurate resources is foundational to digital literacy. my note: #Fakenews

A lack of broad consensus on the meaning of digital literacy still hinders its uptake, although a growing  body  of research is helping higher education professionals better navigate the continuous adjustments to the field brought about by emerging pedagogies and technologies.

Information literacy is a nearly universal component within these digital literacy frameworks. Critically finding, assessing, and using digital content within the vast and sometimes chaotic internet appears as a vital skill in almost every account, including those published beyond libraries. In contrast, media literacy is less widely included in digital literacy publications,  possibly  due  to  a  focus  on  scholarly, rather than popular, materials. Digital literacies ultimately combine information and media literacy.

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to  focus  on  educational  policy details and personal empowerment,  the  latter  encouraging  learners  to  become  more  effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself… this recommendation for Balkan digital strategy: “Media and information education (with an emphasis on critical thinking and switching from consumption to action) should start at early ages, but address all ages.”

African digital literacy is more business-oriented. Frameworks often speak to job skills and digital entrepreneurship. New skills and professions are emphasized, symbolized by the call for “new collar” positions.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can  also  represent  a  drive  to  produce  more  locally-sourced  content,  as  opposed  to  consuming

Digital literacy is a complex phenomenon in 2017, when considered internationally. Nations  and regions are creating ways to help their populations grapple with the digital revolution that are shaped by their local situations. In doing so, they cut across the genealogy of digital literacies, touching on its historical components: information literacy, digital skills, and media literacy.

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How Does Digital Literacy Change Pedagogy?

Students are not all digital natives, and do not necessarily have the same level of capabilities. Some need to be taught to use online tools (such as how to navigate a LMS) for learning. However, once digital literacy skills for staff and students are explicitly recognized as important for learning and teaching, critical drivers for pedagogical change are in place.

Pedagogy that uses an inquiry based/problem solving approach is a great framework to enhance the use and practice of digital skills/capabilities in the classroom.

The current gap between students’ information literacy skills and their need  to  internalize  digital literacy competencies creates an opportunity for academic librarians to support students  in  the pursuit of civic online reasoning at the core of NMC’s multimodal model of three digital literacies. Academic librarians need a new strategy that evolves information literacy to an expanded role educating digitally literate students. Let’s build a new model in which academic librarians are  entrepreneurial collaborators with faculty,55  supporting  their  classroom  efforts  to  help  students become responsible sharers and commentators of news on social media.

“Digital literacy is not just about ensuring that students can use the latest technologies, but also developing skills to select the right tools for a particular context to deepen their learning outcomes and engage in creative problem-solving”

There is a disconnect between how students experience and interact with technology in their personal lives and how they use technology in their roles as  students.  Yes, students are digitally savvy, and yes,  universities  have  a  role  in  questioning  (insightfully  of  course) their sometimes brash digital savviness. We have a situation where students are expecting more, but (as I see it) cannot provide a clear demand, while faculty are unable to walk in  the  shoes  of  the students.

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Future of Education, Mass-Media and Communication

The Future of Education, Mass-Media and Communication

Conference  16th to 17th October 2017  Rockville, Maryland, United States of America

Website: http://rais.education/the-future-of-education-mass-media-and-communication/
Contact person: Eduard David

We gladly invite you to attend the International Conference “The Future of Education, Mass-Media and Communication” which will be held at Johns Hopkins University, just 20 miles away from Washington DC.

blogging for Confucius Institute

Plan for August 17

Introduce students to the blog idea. Short link to this planhttp://bit.ly/blog4ci

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/17/blogging-for-confucius-institute/

  • Why blog
    • What is social media, when SM started
    • What is blog, when blogs started
    • Why blog
      • Blogging vs microblogging

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/31/social-media-and-the-devaluation/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/01/blog-future/

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handout on basic functions with your blog

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grammarly alternatives

https://www.grammarly.com/

alternatives for proofreading, grammar and spelling checker, vocabulary uses, citation suggestions:
http://alternativeto.net/software/grammarly-grammar-checker/
http://www.tricksroad.com/2016/02/grammarly-alternatives.html
https://www.codeinwp.com/blog/grammarly-vs-jetpack-vs-ginger-vs-hemingway-for-wordpress/

LanguageTool

Hemingway Editor  

Ludwig.guru

ProWritingAid

Ginger

Grammar Checker Academic

Writefull

Editsaurus

Unicheck

Antidote

PaperRater

Proofread Bot

Slick Write

Analyze My Writing

Refly Editor

VirtualWritingTutor

Just Not Sorry — the Gmail Plug-in

SEO Tools Centre

Grammarian PRO2

WhiteSmoke

Expresso app

SpellCheckPlus

Stylewriter

Document Grader

Speckie

1Checker

Plagtracker

AfterScan

WeAllEdit

eAngel Human Online Proofreading Service

GradeProof

TextTrust

PlagiarismSearch

Gramlee.com

Compilatio.net

tinySpell

intro computer programming

Intro to Computer Programming
with Steve Perry

10-week eCourse  Beginning Tuesday, September 5, 2017

For today’s librarian, the ability to adapt to new technology is not optional. Programming—the process of using computer language to generate commands that instruct a computer to perform specific functions—is at the core of all computer technology. A foundation in programming helps you understand the inner workings of all of the technologies that drive libraries now—from integrated library systems to Web pages and databases.

In this Advanced eCourse, you can go from having little to no programming knowledge to being familiar with coding in several different computer languages. Steve Perry—an experienced LIS instructor and programmer—will teach you in his lectures what you need to get started, and then the readings and exercises will give you practical programming experience, particularly as it relates to a library environment. Languages covered will include HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, and others. You do not need any programming experience or special software to participate in this eCourse.

Participants who complete this Advanced eCourse will receive an SJSU iSchool/ALA Publishing Advanced Certificate of Completion.

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more on coding in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=coding

convocation fall 2017

Watch our live presentation at:

https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

#SCSUconvocation2017 #VRlib

Posted by InforMedia Services on Wednesday, August 16, 2017

#scsuconvocation2017 #vrlib

Posted by InforMedia Services on Tuesday, August 15, 2017

chips and vr

A Chip Revolution Will Bring Better VR Sooner Than You Think

 

Date of Publication: 04.16.17.

GPU is short for graphics processing unit.

When a PC or a game console runs this virtual world, the GPU chips play an unexpectedly large role, taking so much of the burden off the main processor.

For decades, the processing power available from individual computer chips increased every 18 months or so, according to the oft-quoted Moore’s Law. But in recent years, this trend has begun to slow, even as modern software applications demanded far more processing power than ever before

Companies and coders are now moving workloads off the main CPU and onto a wide range of alternative processors. If they can’t get enough processing power from a single chip, they need many.

Meanwhile, Microsoft has already build a specialized processor for its Hololens augmented reality headset to help the device keep track of your movements, among other things. In the end, this is yet another example of computing tasks shiftings off the CPU and onto something else.

 

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

effective presentations

How to Give an Effective Presentation Expert Tips the effective communication skills

http://www.makeitmech.com/2017/08/how-to-give-effective-presentation.html

https://plus.google.com/101419367635742293475

  1. How to introduce Yourself
  2. Speech/Presentation Opening techniques
  3. Presentation/Speech main body
  4. How to Conclude/End the Speech/Presentation


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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=effective+presentation

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