Archive of ‘Digital literacy’ category

7 blogging tools

7 Blogging Tools for Teachers Compared and Ranked – Updated for 2017

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/02/7-blogging-tools-for-teachers-compared.html

here as a Google Doc

1. Blogger – It’s free and easy to set-up. It can be integrated into your Google Apps for Education account which means that you and your students can use the same usernames and passwords that they use in all other Google tools. You can make your blog private (up to 100 members invited by email). The drawback to it is that a lot of school filters flag it as “social media” and block it on those grounds.

1a. Edublogs – Probably the best option for elementary school and middle school use. Blogs and individual blog posts can be made private, password-protected, or public. You can create and manage your students’ accounts. The latest version of Edublogs allows all users to include videos in blog posts. Outstanding customer support.

2. Weebly for Education – It’s free to have up to 40 students in your account. You can manage your students’ accounts. You can have students contribute to a group blog and or let them manage their own individual blogs.

3. SeeSaw.me – SeeSaw was originally launched as a digital portfolio tool. The addition of a blogging component was made in January 2016. The blogging component of SeeSaw allows you to import and display your students’ digital artifacts publicly or privately. There is not much you can do with SeeSaw in terms of customization of layout and color scheme.

4. WordPress.org – If you have the technical accumen or the time to learn it (it’s not that hard), self-hosting a blog that runs on WordPress software will give you the ultimate in control and flexibility. You will be able to create and manage student accounts, have a nearly infinite variety of customizations, and you’ll be able to move your blog from server to server whenever you want to. That said, you will have to pay for hosting (or convince your school to give you server space) and you will be responsible for maintaining security updates and backing-up your blog regularly.

5. Kidblog – Allows you to manage your students’ accounts. Requires you to pay for a subscription in order to get the features that you really want. Those features include embedding videos and other media from third party sites. Powered by WordPress software.

6. WordPress.com – It’s easy to use and is free, but with some serious limitations at the free level. The free version displays advertising on your blog which you cannot control. The free version also doesn’t allow embedding content from many third-party sites.

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more on blogging in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blog

against government hackers

How to defend against government hackers

By Mark Rockwell Mar 31, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/03/31/rule41-aclu-defense-cyber.aspx

The 188-page “Challenging Government Hacking In Criminal Cases” report, released by the American Civil Liberties Union on March 30, addresses new amendments to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which took effect last December.

Under the changes to criminal procedure rules, feds can remotely search computers in multiple jurisdictions with a single warrant. The rules are touted by law enforcement agencies as a way to streamline 100-year-old rules of criminal procedure

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more on surveillance in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=surveillance

qualitative method research

Qualitative Method Research

quote

Data treatment and analysis

Because the questionnaire data comprised both Likert scales and open questions, they were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Textual data (open responses) were qualitatively analyzed by coding: each segment (e.g. a group of words) was assigned to a semantic reference category, as systematically and rigorously as possible. For example, “Using an iPad in class really motivates me to learn” was assigned to the category “positive impact on motivation.” The qualitative analysis was performed using an adapted version of the approaches developed by L’Écuyer (1990) and Huberman and Miles (1991, 1994). Thus, we adopted a content analysis approach using QDAMiner software, which is widely used in qualitative research (see Fielding, 2012; Karsenti, Komis, Depover, & Collin, 2011). For the quantitative analysis, we used SPSS 22.0 software to conduct descriptive and inferential statistics. We also conducted inferential statistics to further explore the iPad’s role in teaching and learning, along with its motivational effect. The results will be presented in a subsequent report (Fievez, & Karsenti, 2013)

Fievez, A., & Karsenti, T. (2013). The iPad in Education: uses, benefits and challenges. A survey of 6057 students and 302 teachers in Quebec, Canada (p. 51). Canada Research Chair in Technologies in Education. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/5366978/The_iPad_in_Education_uses_benefits_and_challenges._A_survey_of_6057_students_and_302_teachers_in_Quebec_Canada

unquote

 The 20th century notion of conducting a qualitative research by an oral interview and then processing manually your results had triggered in the second half of the 20th century [sometimes] condescending attitudes by researchers from the exact sciences.
The reason was the advent of computing power in the second half of the 20th century, which allowed exact sciences to claim “scientific” and “data-based” results.
One of the statistical package, SPSS, is today widely known and considered a magnificent tools to bring solid statistically-based argumentation, which further perpetuates the superiority of quantitative over qualitative method.
At the same time, qualitative researchers continue to lag behind, mostly due to the inertia of their approach to qualitative analysis. Qualitative analysis continues to be processed in the olden ways. While there is nothing wrong with the “olden” ways, harnessing computational power can streamline the “olden ways” process and even present options, which the “human eye” sometimes misses.
Below are some suggestions, you may consider, when you embark on the path of qualitative research.
The Use of Qualitative Content Analysis in Case Study Research
Florian Kohlbacher
http://www.qualitative-research.net/index.php/fqs/article/view/75/153

excellent guide to the structure of a qualitative research

Palys, T., & Atchison, C. (2012). Qualitative Research in the Digital Era: Obstacles and Opportunities. International Journal Of Qualitative Methods, 11(4), 352-367.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d89171709%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite
Palys and Atchison (2012) present a compelling case to bring your qualitative research to the level of the quantitative research by using modern tools for qualitative analysis.
1. The authors correctly promote NVivo as the “jaguar’ of the qualitative research method tools. Be aware, however, about the existence of other “Geo Metro” tools, which, for your research, might achieve the same result (see bottom of this blog entry).
2. The authors promote a new type of approach to Chapter 2 doctoral dissertation and namely OCR-ing PDF articles (most of your literature as of 2017 is mostly either in PDF or electronic textual format) through applications such as
Abbyy Fine Reader, https://www.abbyy.com/en-us/finereader/
OmniPage,  http://www.nuance.com/for-individuals/by-product/omnipage/index.htm
Readirus http://www.irislink.com/EN-US/c1462/Readiris-16-for-Windows—OCR-Software.aspx
The text from the articles is processed either through NVIVO or related programs (see bottom of this blog entry). As the authors propose: ” This is immediately useful for literature review and proposal writing, and continues through the research design, data gathering, and analysis stages— where NVivo’s flexibility for many different sources of data (including audio, video, graphic, and text) are well known—of writing for publication” (p. 353).
In other words, you can try to wrap your head around huge amount of textual information, but you can also approach the task by a parallel process of processing the same text with a tool.
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Here are some suggestions for Computer Assisted / Aided Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) for a small and a large community applications):

– RQDA (the small one): http://rqda.r-forge.r-project.org/ (see on youtube the tutorials of Metin Caliskan); one active developper.
GATE (the large one): http://gate.ac.uk/ | https://gate.ac.uk/download/

text mining: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_mining
Text mining, also referred to as text data mining, roughly equivalent to text analytics, is the process of deriving high-quality information from text. High-quality information is typically derived through the devising of patterns and trends through means such as statistical pattern learning. Text mining usually involves the process of structuring the input text (usually parsing, along with the addition of some derived linguistic features and the removal of others, and subsequent insertion into a database), deriving patterns within the structured data, and finally evaluation and interpretation of the output.
https://ischool.syr.edu/infospace/2013/04/23/what-is-text-mining/
Qualitative data is descriptive data that cannot be measured in numbers and often includes qualities of appearance like color, texture, and textual description. Quantitative data is numerical, structured data that can be measured. However, there is often slippage between qualitative and quantitative categories. For example, a photograph might traditionally be considered “qualitative data” but when you break it down to the level of pixels, which can be measured.
word of caution, text mining doesn’t generate new facts and is not an end, in and of itself. The process is most useful when the data it generates can be further analyzed by a domain expert, who can bring additional knowledge for a more complete picture. Still, text mining creates new relationships and hypotheses for experts to explore further.

quick and easy:

intermediate:

advanced:

http://tidytextmining.com/

Introduction to GATE Developer  https://youtu.be/o5uhMF15vsA


 

use of RapidMiner:

https://rapidminer.com/pricing/

– Coding Analysis Toolkit (CAT) from University of Pittsburgh and University of Massachusetts
– Raven’s Eye is an online natural language ANALYSIS tool based
– ATLAS.TI
– XSIGTH

– QDA Miner: http://provalisresearch.com/products/qualitative-data-analysis-software/

There is also a free version called QDA Miner Lite with limited functionalities: http://provalisresearch.com/products/qualitative-data-analysis-software/freeware/

– MAXQDA

–  NVivo

– SPSS Text Analytics

– Kwalitan

– Transana (include video transcribing capability)

– XSight

– Nud*ist

(Cited from: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Are_there_any_open-source_alternatives_to_Nvivo [accessed Apr 1, 2017].

– OdinText

IBM Watson Conversation
IBM Watson Text to Speech
Google Translate API
MeTA
LingPipe
NLP4J
Timbl
Colibri Core
CRF++
Frog
Ucto
– CRFsuite

– FoLiA
PyNLPl
openNLP
NLP Compromise
MALLET
Cited from: https://www.g2crowd.com/products/nvivo/competitors/alternatives [accessed April 1, 2017
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academic search engines

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning educatorstechnology.com · Dec 23, 2016

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/71072500350222752/

10 Great Academic Search Engines for Research Students

https://scholar.google.com/ | https://eric.ed.gov/ | http://www.virtuallrc.com/ | http://www.citeulike.org/ | http://jurn.org/  |   http://academic.research.microsoft.com/  | https://www.loc.gov/  |  https://www.refseek.com/  |  http://www.sciencedirect.com/  | https://www.academia.edu/  |  https://www.researchgate.net/

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more about research in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=research

fake news resources

Fake News: A Library Resource Round-Up

February 23, 2017 By  ALA Public Programs Office
http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/fake-news-library-round
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/218917231867987168
Evaluating Information,” ALA LibGuide
Fake News,” Indiana University East Campus Library

From
Mike Caulfield’s Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers
(https://webliteracy.pressbooks.com/)
Fact-Checking Organizations

There are many fact-checking sites outside the U.S. Here is a small sample.

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An Extremely Helpful List of Fake and Misleading News Sites to Watch Out For

By   

http://nymag.com/selectall/2016/11/fake-facebook-news-sites-to-avoid.html

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/237776055306492834

https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview

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UW professor: The information war is real, and we’re losing it

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/uw-professor-the-information-war-is-real-and-were-losing-it/

Starbird argues in a new paper, set to be presented at a computational social-science conference in May, that these “strange clusters” of wild conspiracy talk, when mapped, point to an emerging alternative media ecosystem on the web of surprising power and reach.

It features sites such as Infowars.com, hosted by informal President Donald Trump adviser Alex Jones

There are dozens of other conspiracy-propagating websites such as beforeitsnews.com, nodisinfo.com and veteranstoday.com.

It isn’t a traditional left-right political axis, she found. There are right-wing sites like Danger & Play and left-wing sensationalizers such as The Free Thought Project. Some appear to be just trying to make money, while others are aggressively pushing political agendas.

The true common denominator, she found, is anti-globalism — deep suspicion of free trade, multinational business and global institutions.

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The News Literacy Project

http://www.thenewsliteracyproject.org/

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

fake news

Most students can’t tell fake news from real news, study shows

Posted by

Most students can’t tell fake news from real news, study shows

A Stanford study found that the majority of middle school students can’t tell the difference between real news and fake news. In fact, 82 percent couldn’t distinguish between a real news story on a website and a “sponsored content” post.

The WSJ: Of the 8,704 students studied (ranging in age from middle school to college level), four in ten high-school students believed that the region near Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant was toxic after seeing an unsourced photo of deformed daisies coupled with a headline about the Japanese area. The photo, keep in mind, had no source or location attribution. Meanwhile, two out of every three middle-schoolers were fooled by an article on financial preparedness penned by a bank executive.

But with 62 percent of U.S. adults getting the majority of their news from social media, the responsibility for this issue also lies with the social media organizations themselves, such as Facebook and Twitter. Both Google and Facebook have made steps toward thwarting the fake news onslaught, including banning fake news organizations from their ad network.

Even in minuscule amounts, fake news has a much greater ability to spread quickly and be consumed by many given the nature of the salacious headlines themselves.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Digital Literacy for Anthropology

Upper level anthropology of Native N American class w Kelly Branam Macauley

short link to this presentation: http://bit.ly/lib4anthr

Plamen Miltenoff: I give you the intersection of technology + library and information science = digital literacy + doctoral studies in education and psychology = educational technology.
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
relevant classes I teach and might be of interest for you:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/
and
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

the topic is Social Media and research; research in the digital age

  • General issues

#FakeNews

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

Class assignment (you will need a laptop, tablet and/or smart phone. If don’t have one, team up with your peer nearest you): #FakeNews is a very timely and controversial issue. in 2-3 min choose your best source on this issue. 1. Mind the prevalence of resources in the 21st century 2. Mind the necessity to evaluate a) the veracity of your courses b) the quality of your sources (the fact that they are “true” does not mean that they are the best). Be prepared to name your source and defend its quality.
How do you determine your sources? How do you decide the reliability of your sources? Are you sure you can distinguish “good” from “bad?”
Compare this entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites
to this entry: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview to understand the scope

Do you know any fact checking sites? Can you identify spot sponsored content? Do you understand syndication? What do you understand under “media literacy,” “news literacy,” “information literacy.”  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

Need more info? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
Need even more info? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

  • Academic research

http://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/:
the online dbases, the subject guides,
https://scholar.google.com/
Class assignment (you will need a laptop, tablet and/or smart phone. If don’t have one, team up with your peer nearest you): Research a topic in your class (keyword) using “heavy duty” (peer-reviewed) literature – 2-3 min.

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

Academic research: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/e2d6a15f-6361-4e21-96f9-d054f1d8e49b
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e09bb66-4d87-44a5-af21-c8f3d7ce23de

  • Research using social media

what is social media (examples). why is called SM? why is so popular? what makes it so popular?

use SM tools for your research and education:

– Determining your topic. How to?
Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com
Facebook, Twitter – hashtags (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
LinkedIn Groups
YouTube and Slideshare (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest for visual aids (like YouTube they are media repositories)

Academia.com (https://www.academia.edu/) Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” https://www.academia.edu/31942069_Facebook_for_Academics_The_Convergence_of_Self-Branding_and_Social_Media_Logic_on_Academia.edu

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/

– collecting and managing your resources:
Delicious https://del.icio.us/
Diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
Evernote: evernote.com OneNote (Microsoft)

blogs and wikis for collecting data and collaborating

– Managing and sharing your information:
Refworks,
Zotero https://www.zotero.org/,
Mendeley, https://www.mendeley.com/

– Testing your work against your peers (globally):

Wikipedia:
First step:Using Wikipedia.Second step: Contributing to Wikipedia (editing a page). Third step: Contributing to Wikipedia (creating a page)  https://www.evernote.com/shard/s101/sh/ef743d1a-4516-47fe-bc5b-408f29a9dcb9/52d79bfa20ee087900764eb6a407ec86

– presenting your information


please use this form to cast your feedback. Please feel free to fill out only the relevant questions:
http://bit.ly/imseval

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more on digital literacy for Anthropology classes in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=anthropology

NMC Horizon Report 2017

NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-library-edition/

PDF file 2017-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN-20ml00b

p. 26 Improving Digital Literacy

As social networking platforms proliferate and more interactions take place digitally, there are more opportunities for propagation of misinformation, copyright infringement, and privacy breaches.
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

p. 34 Embracing the need for radical change

40% of faculty report that their students ” rarely” interact with campus librarians.

Empathy as the Leader’s Path to Change | Leading From the Library, By on October 27, 2016, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2016/10/opinion/leading-from-the-library/empathy-as-the-leaders-path-to-change-leading-from-the-library/

Empathy as a critical quality for leaders was popularized in Daniel Goleman’s work about emotional intelligence. It is also a core component of Karol Wasylyshyn’s formula for achieving remarkable leadership. Elizabeth Borges, a women’s leadership program organizer and leadership consultant, recommends a particular practice, cognitive empathy.

Leadership in disruptive times, , First Published September 27, 2016, http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0340035216658911

What is library leadership?  a library leader is defined as the individual who articulates a vision for the organization/task and is able to inspire support and action to achieve the vision. A manager, on the other hand, is the individual tasked with organizing and carrying out the day-to-day operational activities to achieve the vision.Work places are organized in hierarchical and in team structures. Managers are appointed to administer business units or organizations whereas leaders may emerge from all levels of the hierarchical structures. Within a volatile climate the need for strong leadership is essential.  

Leaders are developed and educated within the working environment where they act and co-work with their partners and colleagues. Effective leadership complies with the mission and goals of the organization. Several assets distinguish qualitative leadership:

Mentoring. Motivation. Personal development and skills. Inspiration and collaboration. Engagement. Success and failure. Risk taking. Attributes of leaders.

Leaders require having creative minds in shaping strategies and solving problems. They are mentors for the staff, work hard and inspire them to do more with less and to start small and grow big. Staff need to be motivated to work at their optimum performance level. Leadership entails awareness of the responsibilities inherent to the roles of a leader. However, effective leadership requires the support of the upper management.

p. 36. Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries

http://horizon.wiki.nmc.org/Horizon+Topics

  1. consumer technologies
  2. Digital strategies are not so much technologies as they are ways of using devices and software to enrich teaching, learning, research and information management, whether inside or outside the library. Effective Digital strategies can be used in both information and formal learning; what makes them interesting is that they transcended conventional ideas to create something that feels new, meaningful, and 21st century.
  3. enabling technologies
    this group of technologies is where substantive technological innovation begins to be visible.
  4. Internet technologies.
  5. learning technologies
  6. social media technologies. could have been subsumed under the consumer technology category, but they have become so ever-present and so widely used in every part of society that they have been elevated to their own category. As well-established as social media is, it continues to evolve at a rapid pace, with new ideas, tools, and developments coming online constantly.
  7. Visualization technologies.  from simple infographics to complex forms of visual data analysis. What they have in common is that they tap the brain’s inherent ability to rapidly process visual information, identify patterns, and sense order in complex situations. These technologies are a growing cluster of tools and processes for mining large data sets, exploring dynamic processes, and generally making the complex simple.

new horizon report 2017 technologies

 

 

p. 38 Big Data
Big data has significant implications for academic libraries in their roles as facilitators and supporters of the research process. big data use in the form of digital humanities research. Libraries are increasingly seeking to recruit for positions such as research data librarians, data curation specialists, or data visualization specialists

p. 40  Digital Scholarship Technologies

digital humanities scholars are leveraging new tools to aid in their work. ubiquity of new forms of communication including social media, text analysis software such as Umigon is helping researchers gauge public sentiment. The tool aggregates and classifies tweets as negative, positive, or neutral.

p. 42 Library Services Platforms

Diversity of format and materials, in turn, required new approaches to content collection and curation that were unavailable in the incumbent integrated library systems (ILS), which are primarily designed for print materials. LSP is different from ILS in numerous ways. Conceptually, LSPs are modeled on the idea of software as a service (SaaS),which entails delivering software applications over the internet.

p. 44 Online Identity.
incorporated  the  management of digital footprints into their programming and resources

simplify the idea of digital footprint as“data about the data” that people are searching or using online. As resident champions for advancing digital literacy,304 academic and research libraries are well-positioned to guide the process of understanding and crafting online identities.

Libraries are becoming integral players in helping students understand how to create and manage their online identities. website includes a social media skills portal that enables students to view their digital presence through the lens in which others see them, and then learn how they compare to their peers.

p. 46  Artificial Intelligence

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

p. 48 IoT

beacons are another iteration of the IoT that libraries have adopted; these small wireless devices transmit a small package of data continuously so that when devices come into proximity of the beacon’s transmission, functions are  triggered based on a related application.340 Aruba Bluetooth low-energy beacons to link digital resources to physical locations, guiding patrons to these resources through their custom navigation app and augmenting the user experience with location-based information, tutorials, and videos.

students and their computer science  professor  have  partnered  with   Bavaria’s State Library to develop a library app that triggers supplementary information about its art collection or other points of interest as users explore the space

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more on Horizon Reports in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

PowerPoint Keynote Prezi

Pros and Cons of PowerPoint, Keynote, and Prezi

Posted by Gabrielle Reed | April 19, 2016
https://www.ethos3.com/2016/04/pros-and-cons-of-powerpoint-keynote-and-prezi/

PowerPoint

Pros

The versatility and compatibility of PowerPoint is a primary selling point for many presenters. Since it functions with both Microsoft Windows and Mac OS, PowerPoint is especially ideal for users intending to distribute their presentation out to other individuals and groups. Compared to Keynote and Prezi, PowerPoint has robust design options and multimedia capabilities. Through this program, users are able to follow a simple process to add audio and video clips to their slides.

Cons

Although PowerPoint is compatible across both Mac and PCs, the quality of the program is not created equal on each system – with the Mac version falling short of the PC version. On the design front, what PowerPoint makes up for in design options, it lacks in design function. Plus, audiences may perceive PowerPoint templates and themes as outdated

Keynote

Pros

For those well-versed in Mac applications, Keynote will be breeze. Beginning presenters, along with veterans who are pressed for time will also appreciate the ease of Keynote. Equipped with templates with built-in layouts into the themes, Keynote allows its users to essentially knock out two birds with one stone. Are you featuring animations in your deck? Keynote handles these much better than PowerPoint or Prezi. Compared to PowerPoint, Keynote boasts more elegant, sleek templates and design features powered by Adobe programs. If you want to save your Keynote presentations as a YouTube video or Quicktime slideshow, there will be no hassle involved in the effort.

Cons

PC users might really struggle with Keynote upon first introduction. For example, the application’s design tools are nested in dropdown menus and tabs, possibly foreign to the avid PC user.

Prezi

Pros

Prezi is a useful option for particularly storytelling-driven presentations. It’s non-linear storytelling capabilities far surpass the offerings in either PowerPoint or Keynote. From integrating multimedia and pngs and vector images constructed outside the web-based application fairly seamlessly to allowing collaboration among team members invested in the presentation, Prezi provides unique design and distribution capabilities. This presentation-building option also adds movement to a presenter’s message, which could be particularly engaging in many settings.

Cons

While Prezi’s web-based format provides simple embedding processes for blogs and web pages, any disruption in Internet connection or tiny glitch can reduce design quality and functionality. Even utilizing the zoom functions within Prezi can lead to fuzzy and pixelated photography. Some audiences could find the zoom functions gimmicky, while others could succumb to motion sickness. Designing within Prezi can be a challenge too, as users are limited to a set amount of colors and fonts and shapes are difficult to manipulate.

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more on presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=presentations

student data mining

Beyond the Horizon Webinar on Student Data

March 29, 2017 @ 12-1pm US Central Time

NMC Beyond the Horizon > Integrating Student Data Across Platforms

The growing use of data mining software in online education has great potential to support student success by identifying and reaching out to struggling students and streamlining the path to graduation. This can be a challenge for institutions that are using a variety of technology systems that are not integrated with each other. As institutions implement learning management systems, degree planning technologies, early alert systems, and tutor scheduling that promote increased interactions among various stakeholders, there is a need for centralized aggregation of these data to provide students with holistic support that improves learning outcomes. Join us to hear from an institutional exemplar who is building solutions that integrate student data across platforms. Then work with peers to address challenges and develop solutions of your own.

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more on altmetrics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=altmetrics

more on big data in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

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