Archive of ‘information literacy’ category

Gettysburg Address at LC

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We’re marking the 155th anniversary of the #GettysburgAddress with a special one-day display of the Nicolay copy of the speech handwritten by Abraham Lincoln, and the #LettersToLincoln crowdsourcing transcribe-a-thon with local students and online friends! See the display in the Great Hall until 4:30 today, or find out how to get involved in the transcription project at crowd.loc.gov. #LibraryOfCongress #collections #crowdsourcing

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more on history at this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

MnState OER webinar

Open Textbook Webinar — a 90-minute online meeting to learn about open textbooks.

Peer review of open textbooks is a critical component of assessing quality and supporting faculty looking for resources to use in their own classes.  After the workshop, you’ll be eligible to earn a $200 stipend if you provide a short review of an open textbook from the OpenTextbook Library.  Reviews are due 6-8 weeks following the workshop.

To prepare for the webinar, please take a few minutes and visit the Open Textbook Library (http://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/). Glance through the Open Textbook Library and look for textbooks in your discipline that may be appropriate for you to review.  In order to receive the $200 stipend, you must 1) participate in the webinar and 2) complete a textbook review.  (Please note: There may not be texts available for review in your areas of expertise.)

When:   Wednesday, November 14, 2018; 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Note that additional Open Textbook Webinars are scheduled throughout the academic year.  Please contact Karen Pikula, OER Faculty Development Coordinator, at Karen.Pikula@minnstate.edu if you cannot attend the meeting on Monday. 

How:     Join the webinar through Adobe Connect

My notes:

open.umn.edu

3 models of creating textbooks: 1. write a book on their own 2. commercial model 3. Funder

Creative Common and copyright.

creative commons licenses

CC licenses free to: copy, share, edit, mix, keep, use

reviewing a textbook in the OER. Edit a book in OER

New Directions in Instructional Design

ELI Online Focus Session

New Directions in Instructional Design: Keeping Pace in a Time of Rapid Change

April 19 & 20, 2017 | Noon–3:30 p.m. (ET)

https://events.educause.edu/eli/focus-sessions/2017/new-directions-in-instructional-design-keeping-pace-in-a-time-of-rapid-change

  • What new organizational models and practices do instructional design teams need to adopt?
  • How can instructional designers best make use of the increasing amount of learning data that is available?
  • What kinds of evidence-based practices make the most sense for instructional designers?
  • What are some professional development approaches that provide structure for instructional designers to share their mutual areas of expertise, while focusing on key areas of professional growth?
  • Learning technologists and instructional designers
  • Campus teaching and learning center directors and staff
  • Faculty members and instructors
  • Senior teaching and learning administrators (e.g., deans, provost office staff)
  • Librarians
  • Presentation Sessions: Sessions designed to provide an overview of specific topic areas and successful emerging approaches related to the focus session theme immediately followed by opportunities to interact one-on-one with session presenters.
  • Project Rounds: A series of institutional cases/examples presented in a sequential, fast-paced format exploring a single project, emerging technology, or campus initiative. Project rounds will be followed by an opportunity for separate discussion with each of the presenters.

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more on ID in this IMS post
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

Assyrian king Ashurbanipal

‘Some of the most appalling images ever created’ – I Am Ashurbanipal review

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/nov/06/i-am-ashurbanipal-review-british-museum

You have to hand it to the ancient Assyrians – they were honest. Their artistic propaganda relishes every detail of torture, massacre, battlefield executions and human displacement that made Assyria the dominant power of the Middle East from about 900 to 612BC. Assyrian art contains some of the most appalling images ever created. In one scene, tongues are being ripped from the mouths of prisoners. That will mute their screams when, in the next stage of their torture, they are flayed alive. In another relief a surrendering general is about to be beheaded and in a third prisoners have to grind their fathers’ bones before being executed in the streets of Nineveh.

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more on history in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

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