Archive of ‘information literacy’ category

InfoLit

Map: InfoLit in Ibero-America and the World

http://bit.ly/9hu80u 

On this map, you can find more than 600 websites of libraries or academic programs, especially at a university level, located in Ibero-American countries and around the world (more than 60 countries) that are developing Information Literacy programs or support the inclusion of information literacy in different curricula.

Cases have been found, after reviewing literature and content in different databases, repositories and specialized websites (Web of Science, Scopus, EBSCO, E-lis, RedALyC, Scielo, Wiki ALFIN / Iberoamérica, Information Literacy Weblog).

Steps to build the Map:

Stage 1: Ibero-America (2010-2015)

See papers: http://eprints.rclis.org/16522/ – http://eprints.rclis.org/20803/

Stage 2: Every World (2015-2016)

This map was collaboration in updating for Ibero-America, and its extension for every world of students and future librarians: Daniel Mejía Ushima (2015-2) and María Isabel Flórez (2016-1).

Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have a link to suggest at: alfiniberoamerica@gmail.com

Regards,

Note: Apologies for the duplicate messages.

–Alejandro Uribe Tirado
PhD en Documentación Científica
Profesor / Investigador – Escuela Interamericana de Bibliotecología
Sublíneas ALFIN, Altmetrics, Open Access, TIC, E-learning y G.del Conocimiento
Coord. Grupo de Investigación “Información, Conocimiento y Sociedad”
Universidad de Antioquia
Medellín-Colombia
***
auribe.bibliotecologia.udea@gmail.com
grupoinformacionconocimientoysociedad@udea.edu.co
auribe@correo.ugr.es
***
https://www.facebook.com/accesoabiertoyaltmetrics
https://www.facebook.com/ciencia2.0yuniversidad
http://alfincolombia.blogspot.com
http://alfiniberoamerica.blogspot.com
***
http://bit.ly/1ngD9Oi (Currículo)
http://bit.ly/1EuYvyG (Grupo de Investigación)
http://bit.ly/mfvCdc (Cursos curriculares en Moodle)
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http://bit.ly/12VWYgS (Publicaciones en acceso abierto)
http://bit.ly/1HffALS (Índice de citación G. Scholar)
http://bit.ly/1I4NNPl (Research Gate)
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0381-1269 (ORCID / ResearcherID)
http://www.redalyc.org/autor.oa?id=597 (Autores RedAlyc)
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/cf_dev/AbsByAuth.cfm?per_id=2532947 (SSRN Repository)

library presentation

Gergana Martinova, MLIS, Radostina Todorova, MLIS and Plamen Miltenoff, MLIS, Ph.D. will be presenting on June 10, 5:30AM local time, 12:30PM Central European time at the Western Balkan Information Literacy Conference.

http://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/greening-information-literacy-through-games

“Greening” Information Literacy Through Games from Plamen Miltenoff
link to the conference proceedings here: Proceedings_WBILC2016

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

From ‘Design Thinking’ to ‘Design Knowing’

https://goo.gl/yLrG8l

Rachel Ivy Clarke, Ph.D. (@archivy) discussed the theoretical underpinnings that distinguish design knowledge from scientific knowledge and how it is relevant to research, teaching and practice in librarianship.

Recent years have seen an upsurge of interest in applying “design thinking” to library work, but librarianship also aligns with “design knowing”—foundations of knowledge in design that differentiate it from science.

The Blended Librarians Online Community for the webcast of the session

problem solving – who is doing and how.
how the problem is framed. e.g. is the classification system for the librarians or for the students. or both; a wicked problem

design is not an end product, but an ongoing
iteration. a procedure in which repetition of a sequence of operations yields results successively closer to a desired result
and reflection
in design, reflection is going throughout the entire process.

repertoire is the accumulation but not acknowledged.

rationale – why; critique, constructive, so what – research and education and practice

online risk and teenagers

Researchers: Forget Internet Abstinence; Teens Need some Online Risk

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/16/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/05/16/researchers-forget-internet-abstinence-teens-need-to-face-some-amount-of-online-risk.aspx

My note: after years of imposing Internet filters at schools, “cap” students’ natural curiosity by denying open access to the Internet, etc., this is the first article, which openly defies the bureaucratic / technocratic approach to regulation of the acquisition of knowledge at American schools.

the conclusion from a Pennsylvania State University research project that examined adolescent online safety. This approach includes an important role for teachers as “trusted confidantes” and “educated advisors.”

The results, “Dear Diary: Teens Reflect on Their Weekly Online Risk Experiences,” were published by the Association for Computing Machinery and presented at the organization’s recent Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

“Teens have a strong sense of cost vs. reward, so if we can educate them more clearly on the costs associated with their actions, they may make better decisions on their own,”

The 2016 State of Digital Media in Higher Education

The 2016 State of Digital Media in Higher Education [Report]

Posted by Patrick Merfert on March 23, 2016
Digital Literacy: Students and faculty disagree when evaluating their own
digital literacy competency vs. each other’s

2016_State_of_Digital_Media_Report/Level_of_Access_to_Digtal_Media_From_University_Resources

2016_State_of_Digital_Media_Report/Level_of_Access_to_Digtal_Media_From_University_Resources

2016_State_of_Digital_Media_Report/Level_of_Access_to_Digtal_Media_From_University_Resources

faculty, research and library

Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2015

April 4, 2016 Christine WolffAlisa B. RodRoger C. Schonfeld http://sr.ithaka.org/?p=277685

The scholar-centric nature of the questionnaire ensures that potential changes in research and teaching inform our thinking, not only about academic libraries and scholarly publishing, but about changes in the educational enterprise more broadly.

My note:

By showcasing the diminishing role of physical presence and the increasing research using online methods, this study clearly proves that the 4/5 years debate if the reference librarians must sit on that desk (and answer the most popular question “where is the bathroom”) is futile.

What the study does not show, since it is conducted in its traditional (conservative) form, is that the library is NOT only the traditional library, where faculty and student search for information (being that in its physical appearance or in online access), but the library entails services, very close to the ones offered by IMS.

I see a discrepancy between literature (where libraries compel much more proactive approach regarding services) and the structure of this survey, which focuses on the traditional (conservative) role of the library as a gatekeeper to online resources [only]. Besides entrenching in 90’s practices of information literacy and/or “dressing up” old-fashioned information literacy with the new cloths of “digital literacy”as I witness at my workplace, the faculty must have been surveyed on the skills in metaliteacies, which the library can [must] provide, as per literature.

music education intelligence

bibliography on the impact of music on intellectual development.

Does music help learn better? get smarter? advance in life?

keywords: music, education, intelligence.

Misra, S., & Shastri, I. (2015). Pairing Linguistic and Music Intelligence. International Journal Of Multidisciplinary Approach & Studies, 2(5), 32-36.

Costa-Giomi, E. (2015). The Long-Term Effects of Childhood Music Instruction on Intelligence and General Cognitive Abilities. Update: Applications Of Research In Music Education, 33(2), 20-26.

Pelayo, J. M. G., & Galang, E. (2013). Social and Emotional Dynamics of College Students with Musical Intelligence and Musical Training: A Multiple Case Study. Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED542664
Neves, V., Tarbet, V. (2007). Instrumental Music as Content Literacy Education: An Instructional Framework Based on the Continuous Improvement Process. Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED499123
Conzelmann, K., & Süß, H. (2015). Auditory intelligence: Theoretical considerations and empirical findings. Learning And Individual Differences, 4027-40. doi:10.1016/j.lindif.2015.03.029

Juchniewicz, J. (2010). The Influence of Social Intelligence on Effective Music Teaching. Journal Of Research In Music Education, 58(3), 276-293.

Silvia, P. J., Thomas, K. S., Nusbaum, E. C., Beaty, R. E., & Hodges, D. A. (2016). How Does Music Training Predict Cognitive Abilities? A Bifactor Approach to Musical Expertise and Intelligence. Psychology Of Aesthetics, Creativity, And The Arts, doi:10.1037/aca0000058

Rickard, N. S., Bambrick, C. J., & Gill, A. (2012). Absence of Widespread Psychosocial and Cognitive Effects of School-Based Music Instruction in 10-13-Year-Old Students. International Journal Of Music Education, 30(1), 57-78.

Munsey, C. (2006). Music lessons may boost IQ and grades. American Psychological Association, 37(6), 13.

Schellenberg, E. G. (2011). Music lessons, emotional intelligence, and IQ. Music Perception, 29(2), 185-194. doi:10.1525/mp.2011.29.2.185

Kaviani, H., Mirbaha, H., Pournaseh, M., & Sagan, O. (2014). Can music lessons increase the performance of preschool children in IQ tests?. Cognitive Processing, 15(1), 77-84. doi:10.1007/s10339-013-0574-0

Degé, F., Kubicek, C., & Schwarzer, G. (2011). Music lessons and intelligence: A relation mediated by executive functions. Music Perception, 29(2), 195-201. doi:10.1525/mp.2011.29.2.195

Sharpe, N. N. (2014). The relationship between music instruction and academic achievement in mathematics. Dissertation Abstracts International Section A, 75. 

keywords: music, education, multimedia.

Crappell, C., Jacklin, B., & Pratt, C. (2015). Using Multimedia To Enhance Lessons And Recitals. American Music Teacher, 64(6), 10-13.

le Roux, I., & Potgieter, H. M. (1998). A Multimedia Approach to Music Education in South Africa.

Ho, W.-C. (2007). Music Students’ Perception of the Use of Multi-Media Technology at the Graduate Level in Hong Kong Higher Education. Asia Pacific Education Review, 8(1), 12–26.
Ho, W. (. (2009). The role of multimedia technology in a Hong Kong higher education music program. Visions Of Research In Music Education, 1337.
Bolden, B. (2013). Learner-Created Podcasts: Students’ Stories with Music. Music Educators Journal, 100(1), 75-80.
Orlova, E. (. (2013). Музыкальное образование и мультимедиа-проекты. Mediamuzyka/Mediamusic, 2
Moškarova, N. (. (2010). Педагогические условия интеграции мультимедийных технологий в процесс профессионального музыкального образования студентов вузов культуры и искусств. Vestnik Čelâbinskoj Gosudarstvennoj Akademii Kul’tury I Iskusstv, 24(4), 121-123.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3drih%26AN%3d2010-16211%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite
Coutinho, C., & Mota, P. (2011). Web 2.0 Technologies in Music Education in Portugal: Using Podcasts for Learning. Computers In The Schools, 28(1), 56-74. http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.1080/07380569.2011.552043
Pao-Ta, Y., Yen-Shou, L., Hung-Hsu, T., & Yuan-Hou, C. (2010). Using a Multimodal Learning System to Support Music Instruction. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 13(3), 151-162.
http://http://www.slideshare.net/khbarker2009/technology-in-the-music-classroom
http://http://www.slideshare.net/ThomasDouglas1960/technology-in-music-art-education
http://http://www.slideshare.net/sspengler/technology-supports-for-the-art-and-music-classroom
http://http://www.slideshare.net/DanMassoth/leveraging-technology-in-a-music-classroom

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