Archive of ‘media literacy’ category

podcast at 2x

Speeding Up Your Podcasts Won’t Solve Your Problems

https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/CSFxq67eSC4

https://theringer.com/inefficiency-week-podcasts-speed-comprehension-f0ea43949e42

My note: sometimes around 2011, the Chronicle had a report on Berkeley students listening to coursecasts at 2X (can’t find the reference). Here some other sources about #speedlistening:

Stop listening to podcasts at 1.5x

185 comments
https://www.theverge.com/2015/2/17/8043077/stop-listening-to-podcasts-fast-speed
and the opposite opinion:

Lots of Us Listen to Podcasts Faster Than “Normal.” Join Us!

Aisha Harris Oct. 6 2016 1:58 PM http://www.slate.com/blogs/normal/2016/10/06/speed_listening_to_podcasts_is_totally_normal_and_practical.html

Watching lectures at increased speed? Discussion in ‘Medical Students – MD‘ started by kimbosliced, Dec 24, 2010.

https://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/watching-lectures-at-increased-speed.783750/

The Rise of ‘Speed-Listening’
Books can be places for intellectual wandering. They can also be mined of precious information with ruthless efficiency.

Megan Garber

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/06/the-rise-of-speed-listening/396740/

the introduction of Overcast, a podcast-playback app designed by the creator of the text-bookmaking app Instapaper. One of Overcast’s key selling points is a feature called Smart Speed. Smart Speed isn’t about simply playing audio content at 150 or 200 percent of the standard rate; it instead tries to remove, algorithmically, the extraneous things that can bulk up the play time of audio content: dead air, pauses between sentences, intros and outros, that kind of thing.
Here is also the general tendency of podcast use until 2015 from previous IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/18/digital-literacy-instruction-for-scsu-health-class/

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more on podcast in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=podcast+education

fake news and video

Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/07/14/537154304/computer-scientists-demonstrate-the-potential-for-faking-video

As a team out of the University of Washington explains in a new paper titled “Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio,” they’ve made several fake videos of Obama.

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Fake news: you ain’t seen nothing yet

Generating convincing audio and video of fake events, July 1, 2017

https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21724370-generating-convincing-audio-and-video-fake-events-fake-news-you-aint-seen

took only a few days to create the clip on a desktop computer using a generative adversarial network (GAN), a type of machine-learning algorithm.

Faith in written information is under attack in some quarters by the spread of what is loosely known as “fake news”. But images and sound recordings retain for many an inherent trustworthiness. GANs are part of a technological wave that threatens this credibility.

Amnesty International is already grappling with some of these issues. Its Citizen Evidence Lab verifies videos and images of alleged human-rights abuses. It uses Google Earth to examine background landscapes and to test whether a video or image was captured when and where it claims. It uses Wolfram Alpha, a search engine, to cross-reference historical weather conditions against those claimed in the video. Amnesty’s work mostly catches old videos that are being labelled as a new atrocity, but it will have to watch out for generated video, too. Cryptography could also help to verify that content has come from a trusted organisation. Media could be signed with a unique key that only the signing organisation—or the originating device—possesses.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

workforce skills

These are the top 10 workforce skills students will need by 2020

By Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
June 20th, 2017
a recent McGraw-Hill Education survey, just 40 percent of college seniors said they felt their college experience was helpful in preparing for a career. Alarmingly, that percentage plummeted to 19 percent for women answering the same question.
data from the nonprofit Institute for the Future, there are 6 drivers of change in today’s workforce:
1. Extreme longevity: People are living longer–by 2025 the number of Americans older than 60 will increase by 70 percent
2. The rise of smart machines and systems: Technology can augment and extend our own capabilities, and workplace automation is killing repetitive jobs
3. Computational world: Increases in sensors and processing makes the world a programmable system; data will give us the ability to see things on a scale that has never been possible
4. New media ecology: New communication tools require media literacies beyond text; visual communication media is becoming a new vernacular
5. Superstructured organizations: Social technologies drive new forms of production and value creation, and social tools are allowing organizations to work at extreme scales
6. Globally connected world: Diversity and adaptability are at the center of operations–the U.S. and Europe no longer hold a monopoly on job creation, innovation, and political power

The top 10 workforce skills of 2020 include:

1. Sense making: The ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems

2. Social intelligence: The ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

3. Novel and adaptive thinking: Proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

4. Cross cultural competency: The ability to operate in different cultural settings. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

5. Computational thinking: The ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data based reasoning. The Drivers: New media ecology, computational world

6. New media literacy: The ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, new media ecology, Superstructured organizations

7. Transdisciplinary: Literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, computational world

8. Design mindset: The ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world

9. Cognitive load management: The ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functions. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world, new media ecology

10. Virtual collaboration: The ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

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more on skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=skills

media education differentiated instruction

Friezem, Y. (2017). THE MEDIA PRODUCTION HIVE: USING MEDIA EDUCATION FOR DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION.  Media Education, 8(1), 123-140

https://www.academia.edu/33079666/The_media_production_hive_Using_media_education_for_differentiated_instruction?auto=download

keywords: Media production, media literacy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), executive
functioning, Media Production Hive

the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning (Rose & Meyer, 2002), teaching the same material via various strategies that cumulatively address needs and learning types of each student in the classroom (p. 126). acknowledge all the various types of learners in his class, such as visual learners, auditory learners, write-read learners, and kinesthetic learners, following Gardner’s (1983) multiple intelligence theory.
various ways of receiving, processing, and expressing information by different learners
various ways students can chose to engage in the process of learning
(p. 127) multiple means of representation guarantees each learner processes information in the best way they can, but it also provides repetition of the topic in various ways to deepen understanding
Students need to organize recently acquired knowledge in a strategic way and communicate their understanding to the teacher. Rose and Meyer (2002) created a detailed pathway for teachers to apply UDL using assistive technology.

Media education practices involve demystifying media messages and learning to use
media wisely through activities of evaluation, composition, introspection, and civic engagement. the links between the instructional design of lessons for all students and
the critical analysis, expression, and reflection on media messages are gradually
explored (Dalton, 2017).
Dalton, E. M. (2017). Universal design for learning: Guiding principles to reduce
barriers to digital & media literacy competence. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 9(2).

p. 128 Media production is the process of composing a message via a single or various media platforms. Media production includes creating videos, podcasts, presentations, posters, drawings, and books. With the increasing use of digital devices and applications, students are engaged in various ways to convey their messages using multiple ways of expression and multiple types of representations.

digitalempathy.net/hive

digital empathy media production hive

digital and media literacy competencies (Hobbs, 2010)

p. 137 challenges

Group dynamics often reveal power struggles among team members (Friesem, 2014). The responsibility of the media educator, who is not a mediator by training, is to find the way to mitigate the tension caused by differences among group members (Friesem, 2010). In addition, students have the tendency to use media production as a transgressive practice (Moore, 2011; Grace & Tubin, 1998). Facilitating the process of production involves constant reflection on the classroom power relationship using critical and pragmatic lenses.
Grace, D., & Tobin, J. (1998). Butt jokes and mean-teacher parodies: Video production
in the elementary classroom. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Teaching popular culture: Beyond radical pedagogy (pp. 42-62). London, UK: University College London Press.

The discourse about the implementations of UDL with digital technology has been broad and used for several research studies (Rose & Meyer, 2002).
Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal
design for learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
more on instructional desing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

social media in classroom

Social Media in the Classroom: Teaching the tools at your students’ fingertips today will prepare them for what’s to come in the future.

By

Visual Literacy. Using Instagram to select a single photo to capture an overall concept would transfer to so many subject areas.

People, in general, love Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other networks, because they want to share their pictures, videos and thoughts with the world; this sort of sharing makes people feel important. When kids feel important about what they share, they, in turn, believe that what they learn is important. This is truly what 21st-century learning is about.

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more on social media in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

media literacy guide

The Global Critical Media Literacy Educators’ Resource Guide

http://gcml.org/the-global-critical-media-literacy-educators-resource-guide/

  • Introduction
  • About the GCMLP
  • Contacts for GCMLP Publication
  • Methods of Media Manipulation
  • Breaking the Corporate News Frame: Project Censored’s Networked News Commons
  • Validated Independent News Story Assignment
  • How to Find, Evaluate, and Summarize Validated Independent News Stories
  • Validated Independent News Story Grading Rubric
  • Validated Independent News Story Grading Criteria
  • Student Guide For Evaluating Web Sources
  • ‘Becoming the Media:’ Experiential Learning through Media Criticism and Political Activism During National Presidential Elections
  • ACME Classroom Activities: Challenging Big Media and News Censorship
  • Digging Deeper: Politico-Corporate Media Manipulation, Critical Thinking, and Democracy
  • Service Learning: The SUNY Buffalo State and Project Censored Partnership
  • Commodifying the Public Sphere Through Advertising and Commercial Media
  • Group Advertisement Assignment
  • Junk Food News Assignment
  • News Abuse Assignment
  • Meme Assignment
  • Solutions Video Project
  • Video Summary Assignment
  • Ethics Alerts: Applied Learning Opportunity in Higher Education
  • Ethics Alert Assignment
  • Critical Analysis of Gender Stereotypes on Television Assignment
  • Critical Analysis of Race, Ethnicity, and Class Stereotypes in Entertainment
  • 18 Fun and Easy Classroom Activities for Media Education
  • Five Ways to Flex Your Media Literacy Muscles
  • List of Independent and Corporate News and News Criticism Outlets
  • GCMLP Biographies and Participating Institutions
  • GCMLP Event on Your Campus Instructions
  • Sacred Heart University Graduate Program
  • Media Education for a Digital Generation Book Flyer

Regular Pages: https://www.dropbox.com/s/jp5isqrn6ijv9lx/ACMEbookFINAL101215.pdf?dl=0

Spreads:  https://www.dropbox.com/s/enya4iyyxahg8ik/ACMEbookFINAL101215SPREADS.pdf?dl=0

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

avoid power point

Universities should ban PowerPoint — It makes students stupid and professors boring

http://www.businessinsider.com/universities-should-ban-powerpoint-it-makes-students-stupid-and-professors-boring-2015-6

An article in The Conversation recently argued universities should ban PowerPoint because it makes students stupid and professors boring.

Originally for Macintosh, the company that designed it was bought by Microsoft. After its launch the software was increasingly targeted at business professionals, especially consultants and busy salespeople.

As it turns out, PowerPoint has not empowered academia. The basic problem is that a lecturer isn’t intended to be selling bullet point knowledge to students, rather they should be making the students encounter problems. Such a learning process is slow and arduous, and cannot be summed up neatly. PowerPoint produces stupidity, which is why some, such as American statistician Edward Tufte have said it is “evil”.

Of course, new presentation technologies like Prezi, SlideRocket or Impress add a lot of new features and 3D animation, yet I’d argue they only make things worse. A moot point doesn’t become relevant by moving in mysterious ways. The truth is that PowerPoints actually are hard to follow and if you miss one point you are often lost.

While successfully banning Facebook and other use of social media in our masters programme in philosophy and business at Copenhagen Business School, we have also recently banned teachers using PowerPoint. Here we are in sync with the US armed forces, where Brigadier-General Herbert McMaster banned it because it was regarded as a poor tool for decision-making.

Courses designed around slides therefore propagate the myth that students can become skilled and knowledgeable without working through dozens of books, hundreds of articles and thousands of problems.

review  of research on PowerPoint found that while students liked PowerPoint better than overhead transparencies, PowerPoint did not increase learning or grades

Research comparing teaching based on slides against other methods such as problem-based learning – where students develop knowledge and skills by confronting realistic, challenging problems – predominantly supports alternative methods.

PowerPoint slides are toxic to education for three main reasons:

  1. Slides discourage complex thinking.
  2. students come to think of a course as a set of slides. Good teachers who present realistic complexity and ambiguity are criticised for being unclear. Teachers who eschew bullet points for graphical slides are criticised for not providing proper notes.
  3. Slides discourage reasonable expectations

Measuring the wrong things

If slide shows are so bad, why are they so popular?

Exams, term papers and group projects ostensibly measure knowledge or ability. Learning is the change in knowledge and skills and therefore must be measured over time.

When we do attempt to measure learning, the results are not pretty. US researchers found that a third of American undergraduates demonstrated no significant improvement in learning over their four-year degree programs.

They tested students in the beginning, middle and end of their degrees using the Collegiate Learning Assessment, an instrument that tests skills any degree should improve –  analytic reasoning, critical thinking, problem solving and writing.

 

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more on [why not to use] PowerPoint in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=powerpoint

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