future of textbooks

Memento Mori: Why the Chegg IPO is Not About Textbooks

http://www.edukwest.com/chegg-ipo/

About 80% of the revenue still comes from renting textbooks, which might seem a bit outdated with everyone talking about tablet deployments and digital textbooks.

Though heavily funded and with more than 225,000 digital textbooks in its library, the startup was sold for pennies on a dollar to Intel Education last week.

With the Internet and tablet devices, publishers themselves can now go directly for the students through digital products. There is no need for physical bookstores or other middlemen to distribute the textbooks. Also professors are now able to sell their own textbooks directly to students.

This IPO is not so much about the current business of renting physical textbooks but about the time after paper-based textbooks. Chegg apparently does not see a future with publishers or professors by their side, and they will probably choose more direct sales channels in order to balance out sinking margins.

of mice and men (technology and humanity)

Digitised Necrophilia: Technology and Psychosocial Orientations in the Age of ISIS and Drone Strikes

https://www.academia.edu/14778214/Digitised_Necrophilia_Technology_and_Psychosocial_Orientations_in_the_Age_of_ISIS_and_Drone_Strikes

If ISIS’s images and drone strikes are symptoms of a necrophilous orientation in human-computer interaction today, what implications are there for those of us who maintain that digital technologies should be advanced toward a biophilous orientation that“ wish[es] to further growth, whether in a person, a plant, an idea, or a social group” (Fromm, 1973, p.365)?

 

crowdfunding for teachers

Can Crowdfunding Pay for Teacher Professional Development?

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/the_startup_blog/2015/08/crowdfunding_feedback_for_teachers.html

Crowdfunding as a movement gained initial traction among platforms such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo, where people began soliciting a high volume of small donations to fund a litany of causes, ranging from starting a new comedy club, to funding innovative new products

For educators, platforms like DonorsChoose.org and PledgeCents can similarly be used to crowdfund donations for education-related causes.

Recently, however, I and many of my colleagues have been put off a bit by the proliferation of countless GoFundMe crowdfunding campaigns on Facebook, where individuals seek funding for their college tuition and personal debt. Does the spread of questionable personal campaigns make the general public less willing to invest in worthy campaigns

 

 

Predictive Analytics

Educational Intelligence and the Student Lifecycle – Leveraging Predictive Analytics for Profit in Higher Education

This presentation will begin on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 at 02:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015 02:00 PM EDT

This webinar will provide an overview of the student lifecycle – from lead generation to job placement. You will learn what the components are and how student data can be leveraged for competitive gain through the use of predictive analytics tools. While these technologies have been in use by other industries for many years, especially in the area of assessing consumer demand, higher education is a relatively late adopter. As an example of benefit, colleges and universities can deploy them to determine which students are most at risk for attrition and – armed with deep, historical data – craft segment-specific retention strategies designed to compel them to persist toward degree completion. During this session, Eduventures analysts will provide concrete examples of how predictive analytics has been used within the student lifecycle at a variety of institutions, citing interviews with practitioners, that led to measurable performance improvements. To conclude, we will uncover the benefits of sharing data amongst key stakeholders to the ultimate gain of the institution and its constituents.

Speakers:

Jeff Alderson
Principal Analyst
Max Woolf
Senior Analyst

Audience members may arrive 15 minutes in advance of this time.

 

tablets

Tablet Shipments Drop 7 Percent in Second Quarter of 2015 with Apple Posting Largest Decline

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/08/05/tablet-shipments-drop-7-percent-in-second-quarter-of-2015-with-apple-posting-largest-decline.aspx

Apple saw the largest decline

“Longer life cycles, increased competition from other categories such as larger smartphones, combined with the fact that end users can install the latest operating systems on their older tablets has stifled the initial enthusiasm for these devices in the consumer market,”

 

interactive boards versus tablets

I am repeating the fact below since as soon as the iPAD came out on the market. Pity that campus does not listen. Well, it is not the first fact I am sharing on campus and nobody listens.

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/02/24/for-cash-strapped-schools-smart-ways-to-spend-limited-technology-dollars/

“The functions of an interactive whiteboard can be mimicked with a large screen TV and a Chromecast device, which also allows teachers to use any device available whether it’s a document camera, phone, iPad or other tablet.”

library drone lending program

LITA’s forum has a question, which many are waiting for an answer:

From: David Library [mailto:dvp.sohd@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2015 9:42 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: Getting Into Drones

 

Cool.  My girlfriend and I build them.  Lots of fun and POWERFUL.

 

https://youtu.be/rXtjjwk0ZKQ

 

On Wed, Jun 17, 2015 at 6:20 PM, Cody Behles (cbehles) <cbehles@memphis.edu> wrote:

We are implementing a drone lending program at my institution. I am familiar with the University of South Florida case, but does anyone else have a drone lending program in their library (preferably one that is not being held up by the FAA)?

 

Cody Behles

Emerging Technologies Librarian

University Libraries

126 Ned R. McWherter Library

University of Memphis

Memphis, Tennessee USA 38152

901-678-4558

information literacy

“From Teaching to Consulting: Librarians as Information Literacy Designers. An Interview with Carrie Donovan” by Brian Mathews.  Posted to The Ubiquitous Librarian blog.

http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/theubiquitouslibrarian/2015/06/08/from-teaching-to-consulting-librarians-as-information-literacy-designers-an-interview-with-carrie-donovan/

“Library instruction and information literacy is poised for a transformation that will be groundbreaking and inspiring.” (Donovan)  It was heartening to see that Donovan was troubled and inspired by Susanna Cowan’s “Information Literacy: The Battle We Won That We Lost?” (portal: Libraries and the Academy, 14(1):23-32; online at https://muse-jhu-edu.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v014/14.1.cowan.pdf).  “The question is not about information literacy’s validity. The question is whether we must cling to information literacy as a narrower concept and practice within educational (and now many other) institutions that rely, still, on librarians as key purveyors of this knowledge.” (Cowan)

“Something that has helped me [to begin to transition to a place where “I can leave behind my sense of ownership of information literacy”] was not to hang on to how I have done things in the past and to seek out new ideas and to consider all the options – even those that really challenge my way of thinking, my professional identity, and what I think I know to be true.” (Donovan)

“If we care about information literacy, let us be brave enough to let it go and find innovative ways to further the educational underpinnings of the concept without the bulky and perhaps untimely programmatic weight.” (Cowan)

 

 

 

Keith

 

Keith Ewing

Professor, Library Systems & Digital Projects

digital storytelling

Stories are for sorting and storing
http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

> Willard,

>

> The post 29.126 has been niggling at me for days. I originally want to

> reply with a simple observation that the appeal to storytelling is

> cast in such a way to avoid the complications of narration’s relation

> to narrative (the telling and the told; shown and said). But it was

> the theme of “borrowing” from one domain by another that leads me to

> recall a counter-narrative where there is no need to borrow between

> domains since the military-industrial-entertainment complex is one entity.

>

> I contend that fundamental to human interaction is narration:

> attentiveness to how stories are related. Stories are for sorting and

> storing. *Sometimes this soothes paranoia induced by too much

> linearity.*

>

> A while ago (1996), I explored recursivity and narrativity. My

> starting point was the ability to ask questions (and learn from one’s

> bodily reactions). The musings may or may not have military relevance.

> Judge for

> yourselves:

>

> <quote>

>

> Pedagogical situations are sensory. They are also interpersonal.

> Because they are sensory this makes even learning by oneself interpersonal.

> Egocentric speech is like a dialogue between the senses. In

> Vygotsky’s and Luria’s experiments, children placed in problem-solving

> situations that were slightly too difficult for them displayed egocentric speech.

> One could consider these as self-induced metadiscursive moments. The

> self in crisis will disassociate and one’s questionning becomes the

> object of a question.

>

> Not only is the human self as a metabeing both fracturable and

> affiliable in itself, it is also prone to narrativity. That is, the

> human self will project its self-making onto the world in order to

> generate stories from sequences and to break stories into recombinant

> sequences. Its operations on signs are material practices with consequences for world-making.

>

> The fracturable affiliable self calls for reproductive models suitable

> to the interactions of multi-sensate beings, models that render dyads

> dialectical, questionable, answerable. Narrativity understood

> dialectically does not merely mean making sequences or strings of

> events into stories but also stories into things, strung together for

> more stories. From such an understanding, emerge non-dyadic

> narratives of reproduction, narratives where a thing-born transforms

> itself into an event, comes to understand itself as a process.

>

> </quote>

>

> http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

>

> Funny to consider that those remarks were based in a consideration of

> language and feedback mechanisms. Make me think that the storytelling

> as “potent form of emotional cueing” may be directed to undesired

> responses such as greater self-reflexivity. And depending on how they

> are parsed, Hollywood films can contribute to undesired responses

> including escape. :)

>

> Francois Lachance, Scholar-at-large

> http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance

>

> to think is often to sort, to store and to shuffle: humble, embodied

> tasks

>

> On Mon, 29 Jun 2015, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>> Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi, in “The Convergence of the Pentagon and

>> Hollywood” (Memory Bytes: History, Technology, and Digital Culture, ed.

>> Rabinovitz and Geil, 2004), describes in some detail the adoption by

>> the U.S. military of the entertainment industry’s storytelling

>> techniques implemented by means of simulation. This chapter follows

>> on from her excellent “Simulating the Unthinkable: Gaming Future War

>> in the 1950s and 1960s”, Social Studies of Science 30.2 (2000). In

>> the 2004 piece she describes a U.S. National Research Council

>> workshop in October 1996 at which representatives from film, video

>> game, entertainment and theme-parks came together with those from the

>> Department of Defense, academia and the defense industries. There is

>> much about this convergence that we might productively take an

>> interest in. Let me, however, highlight storytelling in particular.

>>

>> In a military context, Ghamari-Tabrizi points out, skilled

>> storytelling techniques are used to help participants in a VR

>> environment sense that they are in a real environment and behave

>> accordingly. Storytelling functions as a potent form of emotional

>> cueing that would seem to elicit the desired responses. But

>> especially interesting, I think, is the fact that “many conference

>> participants argued that the preferred mode of experiential immersion

>> in electronic media is not the unframed chaos of hypertext, but

>> old-fashioned storytelling.” She quotes Alex Seiden of Industrial

>> Light and Magic (note the date — 1996): “I’ve never seen a CD-ROM

>> that moved me the way a powerful film has. I’ve never visited a Web

>> page with great emotional impact. I contend that linear narrative is

>> the fundamental art form of humankind: the novel, the play, the film… these are the forms that define our cultural experience.”

>>

>> Comments?

>>

>> Yours,

>> WM

>> —

>> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of

>> Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and Digital Humanities

>> Research Group, University of Western Sydney

>

>

>

>