Archive of ‘technology literacy’ category

library IT’s approach to managing tech support

your library IT’s approach to managing tech support within the framework of moving IT projects forward. Also, how big is your IT team vs your staff?

We have created an environment at our library where staff anticipate almost instant tech support. While this is great for our staff and patrons it’s proven not so great for the IT department as our IT projects that must get done take longer than they should and seem to roll endlessly. It can feel like we’re sacrificing the “big boulders” for endless minutia.

I wondered if you all could tell me your library IT’s approach to managing tech support within the framework of moving IT projects forward.

Also, how big is your IT team vs your staff?

Thank you,
Madeleine  Madeleine Sturmer IT Manager | Teton County Library msturmer@tclib.org | 307.733.2164 x143

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While the responses will vary widely based on size, type and IT-issues approaches, I can share one.

Providence College is a private, medium-sized (4,300 FTE students) Masters-I institution.

Our library is a fully integrated (horizontally and vertically) Commons (Library+Commons = no silos, traditional+technology-rich, open 116 hours/week for a primarily residential campus.

IT issues are tiered (e.g., 1-5 in complexity) and we have in-house IT specialists (two – one M-F days, one S-Th evenings) and many “back-up specialists”.  The IT specialists handle most tiers-1-3 issues (sometimes tier 4) very promptly and refer tier 4-5 issues to central IT.  All Library+Commons staff are hired with “relative high-tech/digital expertise, so that there is an articulated in-house IT team.  This means that most IT issues are handled in-house and promptly.  Library+Commons IT reports up to the Assistant Director and Head of Technology & Access.

Russell Bailey, Ph.D.     Professor & Library Director, Providence College  http://www.providence.edu/library  http://works.bepress.com/d_r_bailey/ http://www.providence.edu/library/faculty/Pages/drbailey.aspx

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the biggest challenge (and the most important) is to get the word out to the staff about how it works.  I spoke at multiple all staff meetings about the process, put out a lot of documentation, and spoke at multiple meetings of various teams and departments to get the word out.  Once you have a structure you have to support and enforce it.  Getting your administration on board is vital-if the director or associate director thinks that they can “jump the queue” it won’t work.  They have to understand that for the good of the whole, they might have to wait for something that is non-emergency.

Hope that helps-glad to provide further info offline if needed.

Carolyn Carolyn Coulter PrairieCat LLSAP Services Manager / PrairieCat Director Reaching Across Illinois Library System Coal Valley Office Phone: 309.623.4176 Fax: 309.517.1567 carolyn.coulter@railslibraries.info
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more on technology in the library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=library+technology

evaluate IT in K12

New Ways to Evaluate School Technologies to Save Money & Boost Efficiencies

https://event.on24.com/wcc/r/1483433/3117E1766D64897841ED782BEEFC3C83?mode=login&email=pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Please join me September 20 for a free webinar where Dr. Sheryl Abshire, CTO of Calcasieu Parish SD and a recognized leader in K-12 technology, shares her insights on the top strategies, best practices and most valuable ideas that can reduce IT departmental costs and increase efficiencies.

What: New Ways to Measure & Leverage the Value of IT
When: 09/20 @ 2:00 PM ET | 11:00 AM PT

Register Now

Listen in and learn how to:
·         Use data you already collect to justify needs and resources
·         Create a new value proposition for IT
·         Measure the strategic use of IT in the district
·         Determine if your current technology is making the difference you expected

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My notes from the webinar:
Gartner: K12 technology ; http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/content/education.jsp

https://www.schooldude.com/ Tech support costs in K12 increased by 50% in the last four years from 14% to 21% of the technology budget. One half of the school technology leaders said that their school board understands that technology relates to district oveall goals , it is not as supportive financially. Worse, 8% felt that the school board does not believe technology is important to their district overall goals

Harvard Business Report Driving Digital Transformation. 2015 surveyed digital leaders. Driving innovation most important role breaking down internal silos

https://hbr.org/resources/pdfs/comm/RedHat/RedHatReportMay2015.pdf

  • align technology with educational mission of the school district
  • show value
  • eliminate silos
  • look for cost savings
  • other investments with long-term savings
  • transformational strategies
  • engage community – bond issues, levies, and other funding

consortium for school networking: 10 concepts http://www.nmc.org/organization/cosn/

virtualization; data deluge; energy and green IT; complex resource tracking; consumerization and social software; unified communications; mobile and wireless; system density; mashups and portals; cloud computing

what is a quick recovery?

Action plan: 1. Focus on virtualization and green IT for immediate cost and flexibility benefits. 2. Look at storage virtualization, deduplication and thin provisioning. 3. Evaluate web social software to transform interactions 4. exploit mashups and cloud-based services to address immediate user needs. 5. link UC to collaboration and enterprise applications to support growth initiatives. 6. begin to track weak signals and subtle patterns – from everywhere.


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SchoolDude – Josh Green, Application Engineer, josh.green@schooldude.com

  • lack of budget and staff
  • managing upkeep and replacement of growing number of devices
  • time
  • perception gap (what we are doing)

tool: Insight
agentless network discovery mechanism. scanning of devices on the network. optimize hard software usage, improve planning and budgeting process with status reporting.

MDM (mobile device management). supports both BYOD and school devices. control app distribution across the network, supervise device usage, remotely manage device policy

Helpdesk: complete ticket to close helpdesk solution

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Q&A time

technology facilitators: spend time at assigned schools; talk to teacher and try to figure out what teachers know about technology and then work the principal to customize workshops (PLCs) to build the skills based on their skills set. versus technology facilitator at every school. Help them grow their own.

certificate of attendance-Plamen Miltenoff

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more on digital literacy for EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+edad

phones in the classroom

3 Tips for Managing Phone Use in Class

Setting cell phone expectations early is key to accessing the learning potential of these devices and minimizing the distraction factor.
Liz Kolb September 11, 2017

https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-tips-managing-phone-use-class
Ten is now the average age when children receive their first cell phones
Build a digital citizenship curriculum that includes mobile device use.

Ask your students questions such as:

  • What do you like to do on your cell phone and why? (If they don’t have one, what would they like to do?)
  • What are the most popular apps and websites you use?
  • What do you think are inappropriate ways that cell phones have been used?
  • What is poor cell phone etiquette? Why?
  • How can cell phones help you learn?
  • How can cell phones distract from your learning?
  • How do you feel about your cell phone and the activities you do on your phone?
  • What should teachers know about your cell phone use that you worry we do not understand?
  • Do you know how to use your cell phone to gather information, to collaborate on academic projects, to evaluate websites?
  • How can we work together to create a positive mobile mental health?

Using a Stoplight Management Approach

Post a red button on the classroom door: the cell phone parking lot.

Post a yellow button on the classroom door: Students know their cell phones should be on silent (vibrate) and placed face down in the upper right-hand corner of their desk. They will be using them in class, but not the whole time.

Post a green button on the classroom door: Students know they should have their phones turned on (either silenced or set on vibrate) and placed face up in ready position to use throughout the class.

Establishing a Class Contract

Ask your students to help you develop social norms for what is and is not appropriate cell phone use during green and yellow button times. Should they be allowed to go on their social media networks during class? Why or why not?

Ask them to brainstorm consequences and write them into a class contract.

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more on the use of smart phones in the classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=phone+classroom

POD 2017

 

 

2016 POD Network Conference

http://podnetwork.org/content/uploads/2016-POD-Program-Final.pdf

https://guidebook.com/g/pod2016

Studying Connections between Student Well-Being,
Performance, and Active Learning
Amy Godert, Cornell University; Teresa Pettit, Cornell University

Treasure in the Sierra Madre? Digital Badges and Educational
Development
Chris Clark, University of Notre Dame; G. Alex Ambrose, University
of Notre Dame; Gwynn Mettetal, Indiana University South Bend;
David Pedersen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Roberta
(Robin) Sullivan, University of Buffalo, State University of New York

Learning and Teaching Centers: The Missing Link in Data
Analytics
Denise Drane, Northwestern University; Susanna Calkins,
Northwestern University

Identifying and Supporting the Needs of International Faculty
Deborah DeZure, Michigan State University; Cindi Leverich, Michigan
State University

Online Discussions for Engaged and Meaningful Student
Learning
Danilo M. Baylen, University of West Georgia; Cheryl Fulghum,
Haywood Community College

Why Consider Online Asynchronous Educational Development?
Christopher Price, SUNY Center for Professional Development

Online, On-Demand Faculty Professional Development for Your
Campus
Roberta (Robin) Sullivan, University at Buffalo, State University of
New York; Cherie van Putten, Binghamton University, State
University of New York; Chris Price, State University of New York
The Tools of Engagement Project (http://suny.edu/toep) is an online faculty development model that encourages instructors to explore and reflect on innovative and creative uses of freely-available online educational technologies to increase student engagement and learning. TOEP is not traditional professional development but instead provides access to resources for instructors to explore at their own pace through a set of hands-on discovery activities. TOEP facilitates a learning community where participants learn from each
other and share ideas. This poster will demonstrate how you can implement TOEP at your campus by either adopting your own version or joining the existing project.

Video Captioning 101: Establishing High Standards With
Limited Resources
Stacy Grooters, Boston College; Christina Mirshekari, Boston
College; Kimberly Humphrey, Boston College
Recent legal challenges have alerted institutions to the importance of ensuring that video content for instruction is properly captioned. However, merely meeting minimum legal standards can still fall significantly short of the best practices defined by disability rights
organizations and the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Drawing from data gathered through a year-long pilot to investigate the costs and labor required to establish “in-house” captioning support at Boston College, this hands-on session seeks to give
participants the tools and information they need to set a high bar for captioning initiatives at their own institutions.

Sessions on mindfulness

52 Cognitive Neuroscience Applications for Teaching and Learning (BoF)

53 Contemplative Practices (BoF) Facilitators: Penelope Wong, Berea College; Carl S. Moore, University of the District of Columbia

79 The Art of Mindfulness: Transforming Faculty Development by Being Present Ursula Sorensen, Utah Valley University

93 Impacting Learning through Understanding of Work Life Balance Deanna Arbuckle, Walden University

113 Classroom Mindfulness Practices to Increase Attention, Creativity, and Deep Engagement Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

132 Measuring the Impacts of Mindfulness Practices in the Classroom Kelsey Bitting, Northeastern University; Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

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more on POD conferences in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=pod+conference

LMS vendors

LMS Revival: D2L picking up new customers and showing they can listen

LMS Revival: D2L's new customers & showing they can listen

Posted by EDUCAUSE on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

LMS Revival: D2L picking up new customers and showing they can listen

By 

some_text

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more on LMS in this iMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+management

seesaw

https://web.seesaw.me/ 

Seesaw saves time on organization and parent communication, makes formative assessment easy, and provides a safe place to teach 21st Century skills.
QR code connection, available across mobile devices

Alternatives:

Google Classroom https://classroom.google.com/

Quizzlet https://quizlet.com/

Showbie https://www.showbie.com

alternatives for student portfolios:

https://www.commonsense.org/education/blog/top-11-apps-and-websites-for-student-portfolios

https://www.commonsense.org/education/blog/edtech-quick-take-seesaw-vs-freshgrade

two popular digital-portfolio apps: Seesaw and FreshGrade.

See Saw digital learning journal.

See Saw digital learninurnal. https://www.symbalooedu.com/

neoliberalism

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/aug/18/neoliberalism-the-idea-that-changed-the-world

It is a name for a premise that, quietly, has come to regulate all we practise and believe: that competition is the only legitimate organising principle for human activity.

we now live in Hayek’s world, as we once lived in Keynes’s.
He begins by assuming that nearly all (if not all) human activity is a form of economic calculation, and so can be assimilated to the master concepts of wealth, value, exchange, cost – and especially price. Prices are a means of allocating scarce resources efficiently, according to need and utility, as governed by supply and demand. For the price system to function efficiently, markets must be free and competitive. Ever since Smith imagined the economy as an autonomous sphere, the possibility existed that the market might not just be one piece of society, but society as a whole. Within such a society, men and women need only follow their own self-interest and compete for scarce rewards. Through competition, “it becomes possible”, as the sociologist Will Davies has written, “to discern who and what is valuable”.

Hayek built into neoliberalism the assumption that the market provides all necessary protection against the one real political danger: totalitarianism.

To prevent this, the state need only keep the market free.

This last is what makes neoliberalism “neo”. It is a crucial modification of the older belief in a free market and a minimal state, known as “classical liberalism”. In classical liberalism, merchants simply asked the state to “leave us alone” – to laissez-nous faire. Neoliberalism recognised that the state must be active in the organisation of a market economy. The conditions allowing for a free market must be won politically, and the state must be re-engineered to support the free market on an ongoing basis.

Even his conservative colleagues at the University of Chicago – the global epicentre of libertarian dissent in the 1950s – regarded Hayek as a reactionary mouthpiece, a “stock rightwing man” with a “stock rightwing sponsor”, as one put it.

Milton Friedman who helped convert governments and politicians to the power of Hayek’s Big Idea. But first he broke with two centuries of precedent and declared that economics is “in principle independent of any particular ethical position or normative judgments” and is “an ‘objective’ science, in precisely the same sense as any of the physical sciences”.

The internet is personal preference magnified by algorithm; a pseudo-public space that echoes the voice already inside our head. Rather than a space of debate in which we make our way, as a society, toward consensus, now there is a mutual-affirmation apparatus banally referred to as a “marketplace of ideas”.

“A taste is almost defined as a preference about which you do not argue,” the philosopher and economist Albert O Hirschman once wrote. “A taste about which you argue, with others or yourself, ceases ipso facto being a taste – it turns into a value.”

 

VR and AR doubles each year

Report: VR and AR to Double Each Year Through 2021

By Joshua Bolkan  08/07/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/08/07/report-vr-and-ar-to-double-each-year-through-2021.aspx

a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC).

Canada will see the fastest growth, with a CAGR of 145.2 percent over the forecast period. Other leaders in terms of growth include Central and Eastern Europe at 133.5 percent, Western Europe at 121.2 percent and the U.S. at 120.5 percent.

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Leslie Fisher Thinks Augmented Reality First, Then VR in the Classroom

An interview with the former Apple K–12 systems engineer, who will participate in multiple sessions during ISTE.

By Richard Chang 05/12/17

https://thejournal.com/Articles/2017/05/12/Leslie-Fisher-Presents-at-Ed-Tech-Conferences-for-a-Living.aspx

THE Journal: What do you think about virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in the classroom? Is the cost point for VR prohibitive?

In virtual reality, one of my favorite apps is CoSpaces. It allows anyone to design a 3D space, and then interact with it in virtual reality.

Virtual reality can be quite affordable with Google Cardboard. We can get into basic interaction in VR with Cardboard. There are 40 or 50 VR apps where you can simply use Cardboard and explore. Google Street View allows you to do virtual viewing of many different locations. That technology augments what the teacher is doing.

Most kids can’t afford to buy their own Oculus headset. That price point is quite a bit higher. But we don’t need to have 30 kids using Oculus all of the time. Two or three might work

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more on VR and AR in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

STEAM

Some Very Good STEAM Websites to Use in Your Class

https://plus.google.com/+Educatorstechnology/posts/BTk2UjWECqJ

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2017/08/some-very-good-steam-websites-to-use-in.html

STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering ,Art, and Math)  tools to use in your classroom

provide teachers with a handy resource to use with their students to help them develop critical thinking skills and  adopt ‘an engineering or design approach towards real-world problems while building on their mathematics and science base’.

download in PDF format from this link.

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