Archive of ‘technology literacy’ category

Unity

https://unity3d.com/

Unity is a cross-platform game engine developed by Unity Technologies,[2] which is primarily used to develop both three-dimensional and two-dimensional video games and simulations for computersconsoles, and mobile devices. First announced only for OS X at Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference in 2005, it has since been extended to target 27 platforms.[3][4] Six major versions of Unity have been released.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unity_(game_engine)

React

React

https://reactjs.org/

In computingReact (sometimes styled React.js or ReactJS) is a JavaScript library[2] for building user interfaces.

It is maintained by FacebookInstagram and a community of individual developers and corporations.[3][4][5]

React allows developers to create large web-applications that use data and can change over time without reloading the page. It aims primarily to provide speed, simplicity, and scalability. React processes only user interfaces in applications. This corresponds to View in the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, and can be used in combination with other JavaScript libraries or frameworks in MVC, such as AngularJS.[6]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/React_(JavaScript_library)

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more on Java script in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=java+script

Online Students Need More Interaction

Online Students Need More Interaction with Peers and Teachers [#Infographic]

New research shows online learners are seeking more interaction, mobile device support and career services.

university administrators want to make sure their courses are up to standards and their students are supported.

new report from the Learning House and Aslanian Market Research measures the opinions of 1,500 online students regarding everything from course satisfaction to study methods

institutions need to more clearly share the positive outcomes that come with completing degree and certificate programs online.”

online courses would be better if there was more contact and engagement.

online students

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more on online students in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+students

Python or R at SCSU

Dear Colleagues,

Software Carpentry (https://software-carpentry.org/about/) is coming to SCSU campus.

Want to learn basic computer programming skills specifically tailored for academia?
Please consider a FREE two-day workshop on either on Python or on R.

Python is a programming language that is simple, easy to learn for beginners and experienced programmers, and emphasizes readability. At the same time, it comes with lots of modules and packages to add to your programs when you need more sophistication. Whether you need to perform data analysis, graphing, or develop a network application, or just want to have a nice calculator that remembers all your formulas and constants, Python can do it with elegance. https://www.python.org/about/

R (RStudio) is a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. R provides a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques. R can produce well-designed publication-quality plots, including mathematical symbols and formulae. https://www.r-project.org/about.html

Both software packages are free and operate on MS Windows, MAC/Apple and GNU/Linux OS.
Besides seamless installation on your personal computer, you can access both software in SCSU computer labs or via SCSU AppsAnywhere.

https://appsanywhere.stcloudstate.edu/vpn/index.html

In an effort to accommodate as many faculty as possible, please indicate whether you want Python or R and check your availability using these Doodle polls:

Python

https://doodle.com/poll/fgf7mn5mze9knaps

R

https://doodle.com/poll/mzirw2nc4kfv9whs

Questions? Suggestions? Please do not hesitate to ask:

zliu@stcloudstate.edu
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

For more information:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/imshttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/16/python-or-r-at-scsu/
https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/
https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc?lang=en  #SoftwareCarpentry

 

Collaborative Instructional Technology Support Model

Online Course | Designing a Collaborative Instructional Technology Support Model

Part 1: March 7, 2018 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 2: March 14, 2018 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 3: March 21, 2018 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET

Faculty need a variety of instructional technology support—instructional design, content development, technology, training, and assessment—to name a few. They don’t want to go to one place for help, find out they’re in the wrong place, and be sent somewhere else—digitally or physically. Staff don’t want to provide help in silos or duplicate what other units are doing.

So, how can academic service providers collaborate to offer the right instructional technology support services, in the right place, at the right time, in the right way? In this course, instructional technologists, instructional designers, librarians, and instructional technology staff will learn to use a tool called the Service Center Canvas that does just that.

Learning Objectives:

During this course, participants will:

  • Explore the factors that influence how instructional technology support services are offered in higher education
  • Answer critical questions about how your instructional technology support services should be delivered relative to broader trends and institutional goals
  • Experiment with ways to prototype new services and/or new ways of delivering them
  • Identify potential implementation obstacles and ways to address them

NOTE: Participants will be asked to complete assignments in between the course segments that support the learning objectives stated below and will receive feedback and constructive critique from course facilitators on how to improve and shape their work.

Course Facilitators

Elliot FelixElliot Felix, Founder and CEO, brightspot strategy

Felix founded and leads brightspot, a strategy consultancy that reimagines places, rethinks services, and redesigns organizations on university campuses so that people are better connected to a purpose, information, and each other. Felix is accomplished strategist, facilitator, and sense-maker who has helped transform over 70 colleges and universities.


 

Adam GriffAdam Griff, Director, brightspot strategy

Adam Griff is a director at brightspot. He helps universities rethink their space, reinvent their service offerings, and redesign their organization to improve the experiences of their faculty, students, and staff, connecting people and processes to create simple and intuitive answers to complex questions. He has led projects with a wide range of higher education institutions including University of Wisconsin–Madison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and University of California, Berkeley.

best practices VR education

3 best practices from VR implementation across departments

BY ANDREW WOODBERRY  January 16th, 2018

Professors across many disciplines are embracing VR technology as an integral part of their learning tools

3 best practices from VR implementation across departments

. Link VR content to course outcomes. If you want to VR to succeed in your college classroom, you have to look at how 360-degree audio and video adds value. The forensic-science department, for example, is trying to get a close approximation of a crime scene so that students can acclimate to the job environment and take a real-world approach to investigations. Adding VR without adding value will not be effective.
2. Do a proof-of-concept app first. The history reenactment app was a great starting point, as it was a simple-to-film, single-location shoot that didn’t require much editing. You want to start simple to get an early win. They learned valuable lessons during that shoot, such as best camera placement to minimize distractions.

3. Get buy-in at the highest levels. Marketing students in the capstone project are presenting the final apps to the President, Provost, and other administration officials. Once you get buy-in at an administrative level, it’s easier to secure funding for more equipment and more promotion of your work to other departments.

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more on VR in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality+education

physics marble trackes

Physics marble tracks

He knows how to make physics not boring.via youtube.com/YeanyScience

Posted by Now I've Seen Everything on Thursday, January 11, 2018

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more about physics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=physics

 

 

VR in education must experiment

Riddell, R. (2018, February 2). Ed shouldn’t invest heavily in VR yet, but experimentation is key. Retrieved February 2, 2018, from https://www.educationdive.com/news/ed-shouldnt-invest-heavily-in-vr-yet-but-experimentation-is-key/516160/
Google, for instance, has made virtual field trips to inaccessible locations easier for history and social studies classes with its Cardboard viewers used in conjunction with the Expeditions app. And technologies like zSpace have expanded opportunities in STEM subjects with virtual interactive dissections, diagrams and experiments.

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more on VR in education in this IMS blog

media technology and well being

Kushlev, K. (2018). Media technology and well-being: A complementarity-interference model. In E.Diener, S. Oishi, & L. Tay (Eds.), Handbook of well-being. Salt Lake City, UT: DEF Publishers. DOI:nobascholar.com.  Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/35761357/Media_Technology_and_Well-Being_A_Complementarity-Interference_Model
Media technology—from mass media to social media and from video gaming to computer-mediated communication—plays an increasingly central role in people’s lives. Due to exponential increases in computing power, people now carry incredibly powerful computers—their smartphones—everywhere they go. This ever-greater access to media technology is generating an ever-greater conflict between media activities and the unmediated activities critical for psychological well-being—from our face-to-face conversations and family time to our down time and work lives. What are the costs and benefits of people’s modern media technology use for psychological well-being? Using a complementarity-interference (CI) framework, I review research to illuminate key psychological processes (i.e., mediators) and conditions (i.e., moderators) of the relationship between media technology and psychological well-being. Based on the existing evidence, I propose an initial theoretical CI model of the effects of media technology on psychological well-being. I use this CI model to outline important directions for future research, providing guidelines for an integrated, theoretically informed research on media technology.
Keywords: Media, Communication technology, Computer-mediated communication (CMC), Subjective well-being, Human-computer interaction (HCI)
Definition Media Technology
Media technology. In this chapter, we will explore psychological well-being in the context of modern media technology. In common parlance, we often think of the word ‘media’ as referring to mass media, such as news media (e.g., TV, radio), and more recently, to social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram). But media—the plural of medium—broadly refers to any technological tool that serves as a bridge or conduit to stimuli not otherwise available in the immediate physical environment. Thus, media technology refers to books and newspapers, radio and television, video and computer games—or to any device or method people use to transcend the constraints of their immediate physical environment: from yesterday’s dial-up telephone to the today’s smartphone, and from writing a hand-written letter to texting a friend (c.f., Okdie et al., 2014). Related terms also exist in the literature including information and communication technology, or ICT, as well as computer-mediated communication, or CMC. Most of the findings discussed here apply to—and in fact come from—the literature on ICT and CMC
While using the broad term, media technology, this chapter will focus primarily on the effects of media technology developed in the past century or so, including television, video games, and, most recently, mobile computers such as smartphones. In other words, we will be focusing on screen media technology. I will use the term mediated to refer to the stimuli afforded by the media technology, and the term unmediated to refer to behavior that does not involve the use of media (e.g., face-to-face interactions). Even though media technology itself is physical, I will use the term immediate physical environment to refer to the environment in which the media technology use occurs.

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more on contemplative computing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

Putin’s game

What Putin Really Wants

Russia’s strongman president has many Americans convinced of his manipulative genius. He’s really just a gambler who won big.

JULIA IOFFE  JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 ISSUE

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/01/putins-game/546548/

(translated in Bulgarian http://librev.com/index.php/2013-03-30-08-56-39/prospects/europe/3371-igrata-na-putin-1

“They do plan,” said a senior Obama-administration official. “They’re not stupid at all. But the idea that they have this all perfectly planned and that Putin is an amazing chess player—that’s not quite it. He knows where he wants to end up, he plans the first few moves, and then he figures out the rest later. People ask if he plays chess or checkers. It’s neither: He plays blackjack. He has a higher acceptance of risk. Think about it. The election interference—that was pretty risky, what he did. If Hillary Clinton had won, there would’ve been hell to pay.”

Even the manner of the Russian attack was risky. The fact that the Russians didn’t really bother hiding their fingerprints is a testament to the change in Russia’s intent toward the U.S., Robert Hannigan, a former head of the Government Communications Headquarters, the British analogue to the National Security Agency, said at the Aspen Forum. “The brazen recklessness of it … the fact that they don’t seem to care that it’s attributed to them very publicly, is the biggest change.”

also: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/11/13/hacking-voting/

in German: http://www.sueddeutsche.de/medien/phishing-attacken-der-feind-liest-mit-1.3378411

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

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