InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'technology literacy' Category

SMUG (smart mobile users’ group)

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd April 2014

Good day everyone,

The rising prominence of mobile devices in education and our private lives prompts us to revisit the “tablets” group of 2012/2013. Back then LRS and ITS faculty and staff, who were given iPads and Android tablets, met monthly to share ideas and experience.

With Dean Vargas’s support we plan to reconvene this group. We recognize that many more of us now have mobile devices, including tablets and smart phones, so we invite anyone who has a mobile device (not only a tablet and not only using iOS or Android, but any mobile device or operating system) to meet with us and:

a. share experience and knowledge,

b. seek answers to questions and/or

c. brainstorm and develop ideas as to how we can use these tools more effectively at work and in our private lives.

The group is initially christened as SMUG (smart mobile users’ group, not for our attitude, but for fun). We expect the group to create its own personality and name.

Please contact us if you’re interested. Please have the Doodle poll https://doodle.com/2uaytxbth728sa9b for the initial meeting.

Thanks,

Tom Hergert and Plamen Miltenoff

 

Posted in Android, information literacy, iPAD, mobile devices, mobile learning, technology literacy | 1 Comment »

Education 2.0 Vs Education 3.0

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 16th March 2014

some_text

Posted in digital naitives, educational technology, instructional technology, learning, online learning, teaching, technology, technology literacy | 2 Comments »

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Video Projects to Try With Your Students

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 15th March 2014

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Video Projects to Try With Your Students

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2012/08/5-video-projects-to-try-with-your.html?m=1

Posted in Digital literacy, digital storytelling, educational technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, teaching, technology literacy, video, video editing | No Comments »

Techweek: Hybrid (Blended) and Distributive Learning

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 23rd February 2014

Posted in gamification, hybrid learning, learning, MOOC, online learning, technology literacy | 1 Comment »

16 Ways Teachers Use Pinterest

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 10th February 2014

16 Ways Teachers Use Pinterest
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/16-ways-teachers-use-pinterest.html

Curate Content
Organize ideas
Collaborate with others
Allow students to use Pinterest

Posted in Digital literacy, instructional technology, learning, mobile apps, online learning, pinterest, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

trends in technology for educators

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 17th January 2014

Campus Technology, a leading periodical in the use of technology in education, lists for consideration the 2014 technology trends for education:
  1. Mobile Platforms and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)
  2. Adaptive Learning (personalization of online learning)
  3. Big Data (predictive analysis)
  4. Flipped Classroom
  5. Badges and Gamification (assessment and evaluation)
  6. iPADs and Other Tablets (mobile devices)
  7. Learning Management Systems (on SCSU campus – D2L)
The Journal
has a similar list:
  1. BYOD (it is a trend going up)
  2. Social Media as a Teaching and Learning Tool ( trend going up))
  3. Digital Badges (split vote, some of the experts expect to see the us of badges and gamification as soon as in 2014, some think, it will take longer time to adopt)
  4. Open Educational Resources (split vote, while the future of OER is recognized, the initial investment needed, will take time)
  5. Desktop Computers (it is a trend going down; every market shows a decline in the purchase of desktop computers)
  6. iPADs: (trend going up)
  7. ePortfolios (trend going down)
  8. Learning Management Systems, on SCSU campus – D2L (split vote). LMS is useful for flipped classroom, hybrid and online education uses CMS, but gradual consolidation stifles competition
  9. Learning Analytics, Common Core (trend going up)
  10. Game-Based Learning (split vote), but the gaming industry is still not to the point to create engaging educational games
Regarding computer operating systems (OS):
  1. Windows (trend going down)
  2. Apple / Mac OS X (split vote)
  3. iOS (iPhone, iPAD etc) (trend going up)
  4. Android (trend going up)
The materials in these two articles are consistent with other reports as reflected in our IMS blog:
IMS offers an extensive numbers of instructional sessions on social media, D2L and other educational technologies:
Please consider registering for any of the sessions and/or request sessions customized to you classes and needs: http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp
Please email us with any other suggestions, ideas and requests regarding instructional technology and instructional design at: ims@stcloudstate.edu
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Blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims
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Posted in Desire2Learn (D2L), educational technology, gamification, gaming, information literacy, media literacy, mobile apps, online learning, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

Three Good Tools for Building Flipped Lessons That Include Assessment Tools

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th January 2014

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014/01/three-good-tools-for-building-flipped.html#.UtFjEfRDuSo

Three Good Tools for Building Flipped Lessons That Include Assessment Tools

eduCanon is a free service for creating, assigning, and tracking your students’ progress on flipped lessons. eduCanon allows teachers to build flipped lessons using YouTube and Vimeo videos, create questions about the videos, then assign lessons to their students. Teachers can track the progress of their students within eduCanon.

Teachem is a service that uses the TED Ed model of creating lessons based on video. On Teachem teachers can build courses that are composed of a series of videos hosted on YouTube. Teachers can write questions and comments in “flashcards” that are tied to specific parts of each video and display next to each video. Students can take notes while watching the videos using the Teachem SmartNote system.

Knowmia is a website and a free iPad app for creating, sharing, and viewing video lessons. One of the best features of Knowia is a tool that they call the Assignment Wizard. The Knowmia Assignment Wizard allows teachers to design assignments that their students have to complete after watching a video. Students can check their own Knowmia accounts to see the assignments that their teachers have distributed. To aid teachers in assessing their students, Knowmia offers an automatic scoring option. Knowmia’s automatic scoring function works for multiple choice questions and numeric questions.

Posted in Digital literacy, flipped classrooms, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, iPAD, mobile apps, technology literacy | No Comments »

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning | Four Smart Ways to Use Cell Phones in Class

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 7th January 2014

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/01/how-byod-programs-can-fuel-inquiry-learning/

creating a learner profile, a set of criteria the school district wanted students to learn while in school. That profile includes: seek knowledge and understanding; think critically and solve problems; listen, communicate, and interact effectively; exhibit strong personal qualities; and engage and compete in a global environment. The profile helps guide all approaches to learning in the district.

Kids already know how to use their devices, but they don’t know how to learn with their devices,” Clark said in an edWeb webinar. It’s the teacher’s role to help them discover how to connect to content, one another and learning with a device that they may have only used for texting and Facebook previously. “It’s about the kids being empowered in the classroom to make decisions about the ways that they are learning,”

Four Smart Ways to Use Cell Phones in Class

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/11/four-smart-ways-to-use-cell-phones-in-class/

IN-CLASS POLLING/QUIZZING.

IN-CLASS BACK-CHANNELINGBackchanneling refers to the use of networks & social media to maintain an online, real-time conversation alongside spoken remarks.

IN-CLASS READINGS AND HANDOUTS. Smartphones can also be used productively in the classroom as eReaders for books and handouts. You can place all student handouts into DropBox folders (see “Dropbox A Multi-Tool for Educators”).

ORGANIZING RESEARCH. 

Posted in information literacy, learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, Project Based Learning, student-centered learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

higher education and the information age: literature available at SCSU

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd December 2013

 

Breivik, P. S. (1998). Student learning in the information age. Phoenix, Ariz.: American Council on Education/Oryx Press. CETL owns it
Breivik, P. S. (2006). Higher education in the Internet age : libraries creating a strategic edge / (Fully updated and rev. ed.). Praeger Publishers,. Located: St. Cloud State University MC Main Collection – Basement
Call Number: Z675.U5 B816 2006

Posted in Digital literacy, information literacy, learning, Library and information science, media literacy, online learning, teaching, technology literacy | No Comments »

virtual worlds, simulation, gamification

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th November 2013

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:09 PM
To: ‘technology@lists.mnscu.edu’; ‘edgamesandsims@lists.mnscu.edu’
Cc: Oyedele, Adesegun
Subject: virtual worlds and simulations

Good afternoon

Apologies for any cross posting…

Following a request from fellow faculty at SCSU, I am interested in learning more about any possibilities for using virtual worlds and simulations opportunities [in the MnSCU system] for teaching and learning purposes.

The last I remember was a rather messy divorce between academia and Second Life (the latter accusing an educational institution of harboring SL hackers). Around that time, MnSCU dropped their SL support.

Does anybody have an idea where faculty can get low-cost if not free access to virtual worlds? Any alternatives for other simulation exercises?

Any info/feedback will be deeply appreciated.

Plamen

 

After Frustrations in Second Life, Colleges Look to New Virtual Worlds. February 14, 2010

http://chronicle.com/article/After-Frustrations-in-Second/64137/

—–Original Message—–
From: Weber, James E.
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 5:41 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen Subject: RE: virtual worlds and simulations

Hi Plamen:

I don’t use virtual worlds, but I do use a couple of simulations…

I use http://www.glo-bus.com/ extensively in my strategy class.  It is a primary integrating mechanism for this capstone class.

I also use http://erpsim.hec.ca/en because it uses and illustrates SAP and process management.

http://www.goventure.net/ is one I have been looking into.  Seems more flexible…

Best,

Jim

From: brock.dubbels@gmail.com [mailto:brock.dubbels@gmail.com] On Behalf Of Brock Dubbels
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:29 PM
To: Oyedele, Adesegun
Cc: Miltenoff, Plamen; Gaming and Simulations
Subject: Re: virtual worlds and simulations

That is fairly general

what constitutes programming skill is not just coding, but learning icon-driven actions and logic in a menu

for example, Sketch Up is free. You still have to learn how to use the interface.

there is drag and drop game software, but this is not necessarily a share simulation

From: Kalyvaki, Maria [mailto:Maria.Kalyvaki2@smsu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:26 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: RE: virtual worlds and simulations

Hi,

I received this email today and I am happy that someone is interested on Second Life. The second life platform and some other virtual worlds are free to use. Depends what are your expectations there that may increase the cost of using the virtual world. I am using some of those virtual worlds and my previous school Texas Tech University was using SL for a course.

Let me know how could I help you with the virtual worlds.

With appreciation,

Maria

 

From: Jane McKinley [mailto:Jane.McKinley@riverland.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 11:09 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Cc: Jone Tiffany; Pamm Tranby; Dan Harber
Subject: Virtual worlds

Hi Plamen,

To introduce myself I am the coordinator/ specialist for our real life allied health simulation center at Riverland Community College. Dan Harber passed your message on to me. I have been actively working in SL since 2008.  My goal in SL was to do simulation for nursing education. I remember when MnSCU had the island. I tried contacting the lead person at St. Paul College about building a hospital on the island for nursing that would be open to all MN programs, but never could get a response back.

Yes, SL did take the education fees away for a while but they are now back. Second Life is free in of itself, it is finding islands with educational simulations that takes time to explore, but many are free and open to the public. I do have a list of islands that may be of interest to you. They are all health related, but there are science islands such as Genome Island. Matter of  fact there is a talk that will be out there tonight about how to do research and conduct fair experiments at 7:00 our time.

I have been lucky to find someone with the same goals as I have. Her name is Jone Tiffany. She is a professor at Bethel University in the nursing program. In the last 4 years we have built an island for nursing education. This consists of a hospital, clinic, office building, classrooms and a library. We also built a simulation center. (Although I accidently removed the floor and some walls in it. Our builder is getting it back together.) There is such a shortage of real mental health and public health sites that a second island is being purchased to meet this request. On that island we are going to build an inner city, urban and rural communities. This will be geared towards meeting those requests. Our law enforcement program at Riverland has voiced an interest in SL with being able to set up virtual crime scenes which could be staged anywhere on the two islands. With the catastrophic natural events and terrorist activities that have occurred recently we will replicate these same communities on the other side of the island only it will be the aftermath of a hurricane and tornado, or flooding. On the other side we could stage the aftermath of a bombing such as what happened in Boston. Victims could transported  to the hospital ED. Law enforcement could do an investigation.

We have also been working with the University of Wisconsin, Osh Kosh. They have a plane crash simulation and what we call a grunge house that students go into to see what the living conditions are like for those who live in poverty and what could be done about it.

Since I am not faculty I cannot take our students out to SL, but Jone has had well over 100 of her students in there doing various assignments. She is taking more out this semester. They have done such things as family health assessments and diabetes assessment and have to create a plan of care. She has done lectures out there. So the students come out with their avatars and sit in a classroom. This is a way distant learning can be done but yet be engaged with the students. The beauty of SL is that you can be creative. Since the island is called Nightingale Isle, some of the builds are designed with that theme in mind. Such as the classrooms, they are tiered up a mountain and look like the remains of a bombed out church from the Crimean War, it is one of our favorite spots. We also have an area open on the island for support groups to meet. About 5 years ago Riverland did do a congestive heart failure simulation with another hospital in SL. That faculty person unfortunately has left so we have not been able to continue it, but the students loved it. We did the same scenario with Jones students in the sim center we have and again the students loved it.

The island is private but anyone is welcome to use it. We do this so that we know and can control who is on the island. All that is needed is to let Jone or I know who you are, where are you from (institution), and what is your avatar name. We will friend you in SL and invite you to join the group, then you have access to the island. Both Jone and I are always eager to share what all goes on out there (as you can tell by this e-mail). There is so much potential of what can be done. We have been lucky to be able to hire the builder who builds for the Mayo Clinic. Their islands are next to ours. She replicated the Gonda Building including the million dollar plus chandeliers.

I can send you the list of the health care related islands, there are about 40 of them. I also copied  Jone, she can give you more information on what goes into owning an island. We have had our ups and downs with this endeavor but believe in it so much that we have persevered and have a beautiful island to show for it.

Let me if you want to talk more.

Jane  (aka Tessa Finesmith-avatar name)

Jane McKinley, RN

College Lab Specialist -Riverland Center for Simulation Learning

Riverland Community College

Austin, MN 55912

jane.mckinley@riverland.edu

507-433-0551 (office)

From: Jeremy Nienow [mailto:JNienow@inverhills.mnscu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 10:11 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Cc: Sue Dion
Subject: Teaching in virtual worlds

Hello,

A friend here at IHCC sent me your request for information on teaching in low-cost virtual environments.

I like to think of myself on the cusp of gamification and I have a strong background in gaming in general (being a white male in my 30s).

Anyway – almost every MMORPG (Massive Multi-online role playing game) today is set up on a Free to Play platform for its inhabitance.

There are maybe a dozen of these out there right now from Dungeon and Dragons online, to Tera, to Neverwinter Nights…etc.

Its free to download, no subscription fee (like there used to be) and its free to play – how they get the money is they make game items and cool aspects of the game cost money…people pay for the privilege of leveling faster.

So – you could easily have all your students download the game (provided they all have a suitable system and internet access), make an avatar, start in the same place – and teach right from there.

I have thought of doing this for an all online class before, but wanted to wait till I was tenured.

Best,

Jeremy L. Nienow, PhD., RPA
Anthropology Faculty

Inver Hills Community College

P.S. Landon Pirius (sp?) who was once at IHCC and now I believe is at North Hennepin maybe… wrote his PhD on teaching in online environments and used World of Warcraft.

From: Gary Abernethy [mailto:Gary.Abernethy@minneapolis.edu]
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 8:46 AM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: Re: [technology] virtual worlds and simulations

Plamen,

The  below are  current options I am aware of for  VW  and SIM . You may also want to  take a look at  Kuda, in Google  code, I worked  at  SRI  when we developed this tool. I am interested in collaboration in this area.

Hope the info helps

https://www.activeworlds.com/index.html

http://www.opencobalt.org/

http://opensimulator.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://metaverse.sourceforge.net/

http://stable.kuda.googlecode.com

Gary Abernethy

Director of  eLearning

Academic Affairs

Minneapolis Community and Technical College  |  1501 Hennepin Avenue S.  |  Minneapolis, MN 55403

Phone 612-200-5579

Gary.Abernethy@minneapolis.edu | www.minneapolis.edu

From: John OBrien [mailto:John.OBrien@so.mnscu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 11:37 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen
Subject: RE: virtual worlds and simulations

I doubt this is so helpful, but maybe:  http://wiki.secondlife.com/wiki/SLED

Posted in gamification, gaming, information technology, instructional technology, technology, technology literacy | 1 Comment »