Archive of ‘mobile apps’ category

after tinder

What Comes After Tinder?

By

Eliza, 29, said she’d mostly abandoned using swipe apps for their intended purpose. “Tinder transitioned from being a thing where I actually wanted to meet people to being, ‘I’m bored, tell me I’m pretty,’” she said. “I don’t really meet people on it anymore.”

Talking to women in their 20s and 30s about the ways they avoid swipe burnout (or at least make swiping more pleasant), almost all of them said basically the same thing as Serena, 34: “I can only stand dating apps at this point because I delete them frequently. It feels less like a full-time job that way.” She was contemplating joining Match.com, one of the oldest and most traditional dating sites, in hopes that it might mean sifting through fewer profiles in search of decent, mature people looking to go on real dates.

+++++++++++++
more on Tinder in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=tinder

more on dating apps in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=dating+apps

K12 mobile learning

CoSN Survey: Mobile Learning Top Priority for K–12 IT Leaders

By Richard Chang 04/04/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/04/cosn-survey-mobile-learning-top-priority-for-k12-it-leaders.aspx

Mobile learning is the top priority for K–12 IT leaders, according to the fifth annual K–12 IT Leadership Survey published by the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN).

It’s the first time mobile learning ranked as the highest priority in the survey. The No. 2 priority is broadband and network capacity, which ranked first last year, and the No. 3 priority is cybersecurity and privacy, with 62 percent of respondents rating them more important than last year.

  • Understaffing remains a key issue for technology departments in school systems.
  • Single sign-on (SSO) is the most implemented interoperability initiative
  • More than one-third of IT leaders expressed no interest in bring your own device (BYOD) initiatives, up from 20 percent in 2014.
  • Interest in open educational resources (OER) is high
  • Education technology experience is common among IT leaders
  • Strong academic backgrounds are also prevalent among IT leaders.
  • Lack of diversity continues to be an issue for school district technology leaders.

CoSN is a nonprofit association for school system technology leaders. To read or download the full IT leadership survey, visit this CoSN site.

+++++++++++++++++++
more on mobile learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

confide app

White House staffers are using this self-destructing messages app to gossip in private — here’s how it works

+++++++++++++++
more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

academic institution website

IT #2: 5 ways your college website turns away students (continued)

http://www.ecampusnews.com/it-newsletter/2-college-website-students/

According to the KDG report, prospective students are not only used to reading short bits of information thanks to social media, but many incoming freshman read at a 7th grade level.

“This means your college website must be at the 7th grade level, especially the sections used to attract prospects and to guide them through the application process. No, we’re not kidding,

1. Reading like the New York Times.

2. Requiring Form Fills.

prospective students are often fatigued by long forms that they must complete in order to get the information they need and will quickly leave the website. “Not only will a live chat feature save students time, it can also save your admissions office time answering questions from prospects and applicants

3. Not Understanding What’s Important.

a delicate balance between static and antiquated, and being too interactive. “Don’t get so caught up in the design that there’s a disconnect between what your institution is and marketing gimmicks. You also don’t want super technical, information-filled pages.”

4. Using Fake Images.

images of students posed for the camera won’t do, either. They want to see students, like them, doing the things students do on campus—with exceptions, of course…Candid images, combined with some documentary-style photos from important events on campus, will go a long way toward creating a website that invites visitors to look deeper.
looked at sites like Airbnb.

5. Using Clichéd Statements about Passé Issues

They may read at a 7th grade level, but that doesn’t mean they can’t recognize a cliché.

boasting about unique accomplishments with current relevance for students in a down-to-earth way, such as mentioning a good acceptance rate or a special program for those with learning disabilities. Positive statistics about campus crime rates, successful career counseling efforts or facts about innovative STEM programs are also good talking points.

For more information on the KDG report and blog synopsis, click here.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on university web pages in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/03/22/university-web-page/

technology use among teachers

Technology Use Among Teachers Strong and Growing

By David Nagel 11/17/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/17/technology-use-among-teachers-strong-and-growing.aspx

The study, conducted by adaptive learning provider Front Row Education, found that 75 percent of teachers use technology with students on a daily basis and that a bit more than half have a 1-to-1 ratio of devices to students in their classrooms (up 10 points from last year’s survey). That increase in student devices is helping to drive an increase in the use of technology, with about 60 percent of teachers surveyed saying they expect to increase the use of technology in the 2016–2017 school year.

60 percent of teachers have access to Chromebooks, up 15 percent from last year; 64 percent have access to iPads, down 5 percent from last year. iPads tend to be the tool of choice in lower grades (75 percent in K–2), while Chromebooks dominate the middle school years (66 percent). Interestingly,

+++++++++++++++
more on technology use among teachers in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+teachers

facebook live

By October 10, 2016

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/4-ways-to-broadcast-on-facebook-live-that-fit-any-budget/

#1: Start With Your Smartphone Budget: Free!

If you go to the Facebook Live Map and browse the live feeds, you’ll often see people talking about nothing in particular, with unflattering close-up camera angles and scratchy audio. People often shift their phones from hand to hand when they tire of holding them, and brush the mic without realizing it.

#2: Invest in a Mobile Phone Setup Budget: $150-$300

iPhone Setup When choosing a mount for an iPhone, consider the iOgrapher ($60), shown below. Attach the 37mm wide angle lens ($40) if you want to get more people or surroundings in the video.
Android and Windows Phone Setup The Saramonic SmartMixer ($149) fits any phone (including the iPhone) and incorporates both audio and video stabilization in one piece of gear. The mics are stereo, and you can angle them however you want to capture multiple people talking.

#3: Broadcast From Your Desktop

Budget: Free-$600  Going live from your computer allows you to bring in guests to interview, add pre-recorded video, graphics, titles (so people know who the hosts are), and more.

You can use the built-in camera on your computer or a USB camera, like the Logitech C920 ($99).

OBS OBS (Open Broadcaster Software) is open-source software, which means it’s available for free.

OBS is a great option, but it doesn’t have all of the bells and whistles of paid software to make it intuitive or easy to use. You’ll need to do a bit of setup and testing before you go live.

Wirecast Wirecast ($495) has been around for years and has come a long way in the last few months as Facebook Live has exploded in popularity. The interface is a little more intuitive than OBS, but still requires some setup and experimentation.

#4: Build a Dedicated Studio Setup

Budget: $3,000-$30,000

++++++++++++++++++++
more on Facebook Live in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook+live

Alphabet Nest and Android

Alphabet is breaking up Nest, its standalone smart-home gadgets company, and moving Nest’s software group back into Google.

enerally speaking, Google has very limited interest in making hardware in the first place. The cost of building things is high, the margins are low, and Google’s real specialty is in web services like Gmail and search anyway.

Google started signaling that Android, the most popular operating system in the world, and Chrome OS, its more niche operating system for laptops, were going to get smashed together. The result, ideally, will be a version of Android that can extend its smartphone dominance to tablets and laptops…which is why Android 7.0, the most recent release, makes split-screen multitasking such a tentpole feature.

the real business opportunity for Google is to compel a broad range of companies to create gadgets and home appliances using its software. The hardware is secondary. In fact, building its own hardware can even work against Google: The more successful Google is at selling its own hardware, the less likely other hardware makers want to use its software, since they view Google as a competitor.

Putting all its efforts behind expanding and extending Android has made Google a top player in the smartphone market, even after its late start against Apple and the iPhone.

snapchat education

High Schools Experiment With Snapchat to Reach Teens

http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/high-school-notes/2016/03/14/high-schools-experiment-with-snapchat-to-reach-teens

My note: the US News and World Report is behind times on its reporting, unless this article has been held for a while by their editor: teenagers moved from Snapchat as quickly as they moved away from Facebook to Twitter and from Twitter to Snapchat. The generation, which is running US News and World Report is way too slow to notice the nomadic social media moves of the Millennials.

Here is the January 2016, exchange among faculty on the blend/online education listserv, which could’ve helped the author, Alexandra Pannoni line up with the times:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/11/social-network-highered/

The cited case from Nebraska, Katelyn Gilroy, a library media specialist, who is using Snapchat or school purposes, can undoubtedly have a niche in education, enticing students to learn about their library, reading, etc.

However, it is questionable to present the media specialist’s case from Nebraska as a blank statement; a case, which can be adopted nationwide. Ms. Pannoni fails to mention that since 15 years ago, when instant messaging was the “snapchat” of the times, U.S. students consider these applications their “virtual mall,” where they like to hang out, but are not keen to consider them for educational purposes. In the same fashion, U.S. students are somehow unique in considering Facebook, later Twitter, then Snapchat and now Kik, Yammer, Celly, or Elgg a domain reserved for their private, extracurricular activities.

More about use of social media in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=social+media+education&submit=Search

survey for mobiles

https://smaudience.surveymonkey.com/webinar-google-mobile-surveys.html

Join Mario Callegaro, Senior Survey Research Scientist at Google UK, and one of own survey research scientists, Sarah Cho, on February 24 at 10 am PT / 1 pm ET for our webinar, Market research surveys gone mobile: Optimizing for better results.

Mario Callegaro

Senior Survey Research Scientist

Quantitative Marketing Team, Google UK

 

Sarah Cho

Survey Research Scientist

SurveyMonkey

.My notes from the Webinar.

Surveys uncover the WHY. Big Data,

why mobile matters. tablet and smart phone penetration: around 60-80% in Europe. According to Pew In the US, 68% smartphone and 45% tablet

faster reaction but longer questionnaire completion time on smartphones = device effects

survey design device vs. survey take device – mismatch. When there is a mismatch, questions are asked.
5 strategies to handle mobile phone respondents: 1. do nothing
surveym0nkey: do all surveys have to be mobile optimized? no, so make sure you think about the context in which you are sending out

2. discourage the use of mobile phones for answering 3. optimize the web questionnaire for mobile browsers 4. mobile app

design considerations for multiple devices surveys. two “actors”: survey designer and survey platform

confounds when interpreting findings across devices: use homogeneous population (e.g students)

difference between mouse vs fingers as input devices

what about tablets: as long as flash is not used, tablet is very much the same as laptop/desktop. phablets (iPhone growth of the screen)

mobile survey design tips (Sarah)

multiple choice: ok to use, but keep wording short, format response vertically instead of horizontally.

open-ended q type: hard to type (but no word on voice recognition???)

logo

multimedia: images, clarity, video, avoid (bandwidth constrains), use Youtube, so every device can play it, versus Flash, Java Script etc

testing and length: as usual

URL: as short as possible. consider QR code

growth of survey taking on mobile devices

growth of survey taking on mobile devices

 

 

1 2 3 7