InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'online learning' Category

online course design

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 24th October 2014

From the LinkedIn discussion group Higher Education Teaching and Learning

STUCK IN THE 90S: ONLINE COURSE DESIGN IN TRADITIONAL HIGHER EDUCATION

http://higheredmanagement.net/2014/10/22/stuck-in-the-90s-online-course-design-in-traditional-higher-education/

Of course, not all aspects of online course design require a team of specialists, a longer development time, and more funding. Some things can be done quickly, cheaply and by individuals with focused skill sets.

But technology can, when built with a deep understanding of how students learn, meet both of these needs. We can build online courses that provide students with hundreds of opportunities to test their knowledge. Using scientifically-based learning analytics, we can provide each learner with immediate, context-specific feedback. We can build software that constantly responds to each student’s cognitive and educational differences and serves up activities that address these differences.

  • Michael Berta, Ed.D.Michael

    Michael Berta, Ed.D.

    Educator, technologist, researcher, and innovator in edtech, distance education, and faculty development

    “Placing the burden on lone educators with minuscule (or non-existent) funding and who are not hired for their strengths in instructional media development is neither logical, nor fair. But more to the point, it’s a lost opportunity to leverage high-quality course design to drive improvements in learning outcomes.”

    I could not agree more with this statement and the remainder of the article. I’ve long supported an instructional design partnership model where faculty occupy a leading role along with other professionals capable of making the interactions, activities, and rich-media meet the quality needs of an increasingly complex learning environment (and world).

  • Judith

    Judith Killion

    Editor at Individual Basis

    We need to start imagining new models for building, acquiring and sharing instructional media.

    This has always been an issue. My students love activities that provide them with immediate feedback. I spend extra hours building a wide variety of different activities into each Learning module. It takes time and effort and if I am going to address different learning styles that is an entirely different issue. To create effective interactive learning tools that will not waste my students time and will challenge their skill level consumes more time than planning for a face to face class with different activities. I would love to talk to someone-be able to explain what I want my students to learn, suggest a few interactive choices, and come back later to find age related learning activities that fit different learning styles.

  • Alex TolleyAlex

    Alex Tolley

    Owner, MyMeemz

    There is going to be a fight because this model is more like a business product that educators contribute to, rather than own. Perhaps this is the true industrialization of education, replacing the craft model of individual teaching with standardized, high quality product?

  • Maria LaverghettaMaria

    Maria Laverghetta

    Enrollment Advisor – Pearson Embanet

    I have forwarded this article on to members of the course development team within Pearson for their feedback. I am curious to see their impression of the article versus mine, considering I predominantly am a part of recruitment services for Pearson specifically. Within our academic partnerships platform, we do contend with faculty, should they employ our course development team, to this vein because the ownership usually rests with the instructor solely. Editing course content or abridging related material so that it could be received potentially as more either user-friendly or technologically savvy can be a source of major contention with faculty members. I do agree that this is an industrialization of education to an extent, but it also pushes the ownership of traditional education past the instructor, a predominantly sole proprietorship environment, to an completely different team effort. The natural technological growing pains coupled with role expansion and differentiation are also issues needing to be addressed as well.

  • Alex TolleyAlex

    Alex Tolley

    Owner, MyMeemz

    Suppose one was to take this seriously. What might such a course look like – for a subject like Biology? Could it be built on existing LMS platforms, or is a new platform required?

  • Judith

    Judith Killion

    Editor at Individual Basis

    I think that both individual ownership and team collaboration are important to the development of successful online learning. We (hopefully) use the concepts of group and team learning in our classroom environments. We should not be afraid to open ourselves up to some of the positive opportunities that could develop from participating in these practices. It does not mean giving up our ownership of content and presentation. I see it as a marketplace of choice where instructors can decide what kinds of activities, helps, prompts, extra materials, and resources they want to add to their class content. The choices could be categorized by learning styles or how they fit into learning paradigms. I think we must face the reality that some parts of education will have to be more industrialized than others just because of the delivery method. This does not have to be a negative issue if there are enough choices to help instructors develop the rigorous content they want to deliver without sacrificing their entire life to the project.

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, educational technology, hybrid learning, information technology, instructional technology, mobile learning, online learning, student-centered learning | No Comments »

Early Learners’ Tech Use

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 16th October 2014

‘Screen Time’ Alone Too Limited a Gauge of Early Learners’ Tech Use, Report Says

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2014/10/screen_time_early_learners_RAND.html

screen time as the sole measure of what’s OK for children is no longer adequate, the RAND researchers argue that screen-time limits shoudn’t go the way of the VCR:

Limits on screen time may remain important in restricting use that is passive, sedentary, or noneducational, and they may also prove useful in ensuring that children engage in a balanced combination of activities.

However, a more-comprehensive definition of developmentally appropriate technology use will empower ECE providers and families to make better decisions about the ways in which young children use technology–and help maximize the benefits young children receive from this use.

my note: information on Pinterest still goes the other direction. E.g.:
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/284923113897755173/
screen time

Posted in digital identity, digital naitives, instructional technology, learning, learning styles, online learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

50 Shades of Mobile

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 4th September 2014

50 Shades of Mobile

http://www.themobilenative.org/2012/09/50-shades-of-mobile.html

Smart phones (MLDs)
iPads
Blogs
BYOD/BYOT
Videos

Posted in Blog, Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, educational technology, hybrid learning, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, iPAD, media literacy, mobile apps, mobile apps, mobile devices, online learning, social media, technology literacy | No Comments »

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 1st September 2014

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/05/math-science-history-games-break-boundaries-between-subjects-interdisciplinary-learning/

possibilities for a formal Renaissance-Man-Liberal-Arts education remain limited to the elite. The average, or common, student is encouraged to choose majors and institutions that track into a specialized vocation.

MincraftEDU and SimCityEDU provide flexible options for integrating familiar games with traditional classroom curriculum.

The ability to apply knowledge across disciplines is important, but it is not enough. It is important to combine that knowledge with strong social and emotional skills that serve as the foundation for good citizenship in the 21st Century.

The MindShift Guide to Games and Learning

more on gaming in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

Posted in gamification, gaming, learning, learning styles, mobile learning, Multiple intelligences, online learning, open learning, Project Based Learning, student-centered learning | No Comments »

Why and How Teachers Are Using Twitter

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 12th July 2014

 Why and How Teachers Are Using Twitter

http://www.edudemic.com/teachers-are-using-twitter/

Why and How Teachers Are Using Twitter

Posted in distance learning, distributive learning, hybrid learning, information technology, instructional technology, learning, online learning, social media, teaching, Twitter | No Comments »

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 14th June 2014

5 Tips for eLearning Voice Recording

http://elearningindustry.com/5-tips-for-elearning-voice-recording

These are the top 5 frequent e-Learning voice recording situations that I’ve come across:

  1. A.C.R.O.N.Y.M.S.
    Is this pronounced A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S or ‘acronyms’? Is it read as letters or read as a word? A lot of scripts do have acronyms related to company or industry jargon. Define this in the script to avoid confusion and save re-records! You can use ALL CAPS but that may not be enough. Periods or dashes between letters (A-C-R-O-N-Y-M-S) generally indicate the word to be read as individual letters. But to be safe, put explanation notes in the margin or at the top of the script defining correct pronunciation, to reduce risk.
  2. Audio file – technical specifications
    If you hire a voice talent to record for you, usually you ask for either mp3 or wav audio files back from her. But are you also specifying the bit rate? 16 bit resolution is the gold standard. If you get 24 bit, your audio may sound garbled but only after it’s embedded into your program. Save time and trouble upfront by stating your audio tech specs!
  3. Attitude or Point Of View
    What kind of attitude do you want to hear in the voice recording? Think about the end listener. What will peak their interest and attentiveness more? By taking the small amount of time to define the “who is talking” and “to whom”, you can help the person recording to provide a POV (point of view) with the right attitude. Plus, it’s a great way to provide impact and underscore the project for the client. This is a gem – often unused! For example, is this a co-worker talking to her peers or (differently) is she showing a new person the ropes? Is this an SME (subject matter expert) sharing expert information? To whom – Top management or research engineers? If your project is required information, like an annual safety review or similar, it can often be very dry material. Taking a couple minutes to think about the role of who delivers such information can energize dry material. Some more general examples of attitude can be: Strong and Authoritative. Caring and Conversational. Casual like a co-worker. Blue collar vs white collar.
  4. Proximity
    Another gem of a different color! A voice recording can be done further or closer to the microphone. We call that ‘proximity’. This can change or impact the way a listener responds. Compare whispering vs talking at a cubicle vs presenting to a room of people. Changing ‘proximity’ can create poignant moments that listeners will notice. Let your clients know about this technique as well. Used sparingly = high impact!
  5. Script Writing flow – or Writing with listening in mind
    After all the information is written, review the script for a flow of words that, when read aloud, are easy to comprehend and will engage the listener. This may be hard to find time for, depending on your client’s budget – but it is one of those quality elements that can win you a client’s loyalty. When I see a line or two in a script that I think can be phrased to flow more conversationally, I might offer it as an alternate.

Posted in audio editing, e-learning, mobile learning, online learning, technology | No Comments »

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education: excellent infographic

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd June 2014

How Social Media Is Being Used In Education

http://www.edudemic.com/social-media-in-education/

Here is also an IMS blog entry about the use of Twitter in education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/05/twitter-resources-for-its-use-in-education/

how social media is being used in education

Posted in Digital literacy, information literacy, mobile apps, mobile devices, mobile learning, online learning, pedagogy, social media, teaching, technology literacy | No Comments »

The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th May 2014

The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/05/the-5-step-model-to-teach-students.html

1- Determine learning objectives
This is the initial phase where you need to identify the behaviours you want your students to exhibit and work on encapsulating these behaviours in an overarching higher order thinking schema.
2-Teach through questioning
The importance of integrating questions into instruction is uncontested. Thought-provoking questions help students explore learning from different perspectives. The art of posing well-formulated questions is regaled by a set of techniques, some of which are included in this wonderful poster: Questions A Critical Thinker Asks.
3-Practice before you assess
This is where hands-on learning activities are called for. To consolidate their understandings and therefore increase the retention rate of information taught, students need to utilize all components of active learning such as simulation, experimentations,rehearsing…etc

4- Review, refine, and improve
Students’ feedback that you can garner either formally or informally constitute the backbone of your teaching procedure. It provides you with insights into areas that students need help with and also informs your teaching objectives and methodology. There are a variety of tools you can use to collect feedback from your students, check out the  8 Practical tools to easily gather students feedback.
5- Provide feedback and assessment of learning
As you need students feedback to help you inform your teaching methodology, students too  need your feedback. They need to learn how they are learning and assess their overall achievement. One way to do this is to provide them with grading rubrics for self-assessment. Here are some other resources to help you provide better feedback to your students:

Posted in assessment, learning, online learning, teaching | No Comments »

MANAGING ONLINE COURSE WORKLOAD

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 8th May 2014

MANAGING ONLINE COURSE WORKLOAD

http://www.academicimpressions.com/PDF/pdf_serve.php?i=1804&q=24756q203944kR102

Posted in Digital literacy, distance learning, distributive learning, e-learning, hybrid learning, mobile learning, online learning, student-centered learning, technology literacy | No Comments »

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 5th May 2014

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups

http://home.fau.edu/musgrove/web/communication/PRACTICAL%20TIPS%20FOR%20TEACHING%20ONLINE%20GROUPS.pdf

44. Teaching in an online environment should be a team effort. You should be
able to call upon technology specialists, instructional designers, and many
others to help you develop and implement your course.

 

Posted in Desire2Learn (D2L), Discussion List, online learning, technology | No Comments »